Course Review: Pat McNamara, TMACS, Inc. Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail; December 16th & 17th, 2017 – Swansea, South Carolina (Host: Panteao Productions)

Earlier this year I finished reading Pat McNamara’s book, T.A.P.S. – Tactical Application of Practical Shooting. Immediately after that, I started  reading, “Sentinel – Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail.” Once I finished that book I knew that I wanted to attend a course with Pat sometime in the future, better yet host him for a course here in Florida. (We’ve got that scheduled, T.A.P.S. Pistol & Carbine Combo course on March 3rd and 4th, 2018 here in Lakeland)

Checking the TMACS, Inc training schedule, I found a Sentinel course listed in South Carolina at Panteao Productions and signed up immediately. So, two weeks ago I set my GPS to the SandLapper Rifle Range & Gun Club and arrived in the mid-afternoon the day prior to the course. Upon my arrival, I was greeted with a friendly Hello, and given a gift bag for attending the course, I thought this was a nice gesture from the Panteao Productions folks, if I lived in the Columbia area, I would definitely become a member of their gun club. My reasoning to stop at the facility first was it was on the way and I could gauge how long it would take me to get there the next morning from my hotel.

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Next, I was off to my hotel just outside Fort Jackson to get checked in and then like magic, my GPS mysteriously found its way to Palmetto State Armory, Sportsman’s Warehouse, and Academy Sports. It must be nice to have all three places within a few miles of one another where you live, and if you can’t find something to buy in these three places, you’re not an outdoors person or a gun person.

On Saturday morning I woke up to 28° weather, yes 28° weather. A little cold for this Florida boy, but it was all mind over matter, I didn’t mind, so it didn’t matter. I grabbed some fruit, chicken and a few bottles of water at the local Walmart, filled my gas tank, and made the twenty-minute drive down to Swansea arriving a little before 8:00am.

When I got on the property I was once again greeted by the Panteao staff and I signed a standard participation waiver and one for Panteao Productions itself because this course was being taped for a new DVD that they will release soon. You can find more information about that by clicking on the Panteao Productions hyperlinks I have embedded in this posting.

 

(Photo courtesy of Panteao Productions)

When I arrived at the range I was greeted by Pat with a firm handshake and a thank you for coming. I took the opportunity to thank him for setting up a course with me in Florida and then I was off to make sure I had my gear squared away. As each student arrived, Pat made a point to greet them, thank them for coming and he also asked where everyone came from as well. We had students from “Free America” and some from “UnFree America.” I believe one person flew in from California and one from Chicago, one or two from Virginia and the rest were all southerners from states like Alabama, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and yours truly from Florida.

Once it warmed up a little, Pat started with a short bio and then explained his philosophy on Outcome Based Training versus Performance Based Training.

Outcome-Based Training: Execution with consideration of the consequences, will I succeed, or will I fail? Outcome-Based Training is how many, how much, how fast.

Performance Based Training: How well can I perform a task. Performance is measured by doing what we can with what we have. It also requires the student to be introspective and to perform an honest self-assessment of where your skills are, not where you wish they were. The probability of achieving the outcome you desire will increase once you let go of the need to have it.

The Sentinel course is a foundational skills course with pistol and carbine at the forefront. There are also four additional blocks of instruction on Vehicle Preparedness/Urban Survival Skills, Combat Strength Training, Your House/Your Fortress, and Fighting.

Pat then went over his interpretation of the four safety rules, and then we started with getting some dope with our rifle optics. (Pro Tip: Show up to Gun School with your rifle properly zeroed.)

After each of us had a zero we then confirmed our zero with our iron sights. Moving forward we performed a simple “call your shot” drill from the standing position and then we shot five rounds resting our barrels on a fixed object, turning the rifle 90° and lastly using a forced parallax with our optic.

I took a photo of Pat’s target and posted it below so you can see his “storyboard.” He uses this storyboard to collect empirical data from his training sessions and takes a photo of it so he can refer to it in the future, this is similar to a system that I use; however, Pat takes it to a whole new level. As you can see this target has all of his zeroing information.

  1. Date
  2. Location
  3. Distance
  4. Temperature
  5. Wind Speed/Direction
  6. Rifle or Weapon System
  7. Ammunition
  8. Optic

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Next, we shot a “BRM Payoff” this is a 200-point scored course of fire done on four NRA B-8 bulls-eye centers from standing sitting, kneeling and prone. I have an excellent video of Pat transitioning through these positions that I will post shortly to my Facebook and Instagram accounts, links to those are at the bottom.

My BRM Payoff scores were 181 and 185, incremental improvements are good if you are focused on performance-based training and I was happy with these scores; however, even though they showed incremental improvement, there is room for a whole lot more.

This brought us to the first mini-block of instruction on vehicle preparedness. Most of us attending the course were surprised to learn what Pat has for his everyday driver, I would have never guessed it. Again, without giving away the entire POI or the contents of his book, let’s say Pat keeps a “Trunk Gun” or “Truck Gun” in whatever he is driving with an “I’m coming to get you” bag and another bag that he called his “Batman Bag.” The second bag being somewhat of a “Go Bag” with a few hours supply of survival essentials, a little food, water and some other things that you would need in case you got stranded or you were going to help a loved one who was stranded.

Next Pat talked about “dryfiring your vehicle” making sure you can debus in a hurry if you need to and that you should think of ways to escape, remember that mobility = survivability. Dryfiring your vehicle is particularly important when you rent a car or use one that you typically don’t drive much.

Once we finished lunch we started with some basic drills with the pistol.

Remember what the basics of pistol shooting are, sight alignment and controlling the trigger properly. All of us including Pat started at the seven-yard line from a ready position shooting single shots using the hole of our first shot as an aiming point for the rest. We then shot controlled pairs and ended with strong hand only.

It’s important to note that Pat is one of those trainers who could be training military units at Fort Bragg, or a SWAT Team one day and responsibly armed citizens the next, he is a rare breed who understands the differences in training these diverse groups of people and what their training needs are, unfortunately, many who make the transition from military to civilian life do not and they hang out a shingle professing their skills and they fail miserably.

We then had a block of instruction on Combat Strength Training.

The program breaks down tasks into four categories:

  1. Strength: How Much
  2. Power: Rate of Force Production; How Much, How Fast
  3. Speed & Quickness: Speed = Fast in One Direction/Quickness = Fast in Multiple Directions
  4. Hypertrophy: Muscular Development

My takeaway was that Combat Strength Training is not about building rock hard abs or a huge chest and biceps, it is about self-preservation and creating some longevity. It is also about making sure you are “fit to fight.”

TD1 wrapped up with an overview of what we accomplished and a short question and answer session.

We started TD2, at the same time, and with the same BRM Payoff Drill we did on TD1, my score was 188. Once again an incremental improvement and I was pleased with that because you are either getting better or you’re getting worse, you never stay the same.

We then cleared our rifles and shot a “National Match Mod” pistol 75-point course of fire twice for a score. This course of fire used a standard IPSC target using the following scoring method, minus 1pt for C zone hits, minus 2pts for D zone hits and -5 for misses. Make note of that because the next few drills had the same scoring method.

I found the National Match Mod to be an extremely challenging course of fire especially since it was shot at 50 and 25 yards. My 53-year old eyes are not as sharp as they used to be and so my first run was not very good, I only managed a 64. Then I spied what Pat had done to his target, and now I know why he always keeps a sharpie in his pocket. Pat had outlined the A zone of his target, in doing so it made a huge difference for me, I scored a 71 on the second go around. Little things like that give yourself an advantage and if it is within the rules, why not use it?

Our next course of fire was a version of his “Running and Gunning” drill. This was also timed and scored on an IPSC target as well. A good way to understand “Running and Gunning” is to watch the man himself explain and demonstrate it in the link I have provided here. Running and Gunning

We then shot “The Hellion” this one requires you to be a thinker and not just a shooter. I haven’t seen it on any of his videos, and because it is something that is difficult to explain in the written word, I’ll just do a video of it in a couple weeks and post it to my page and edit this blog posting with a link.

Lastly, we shot the four-position rifle timed course of fire at the same IPSC target used for the National Match Mod, Running and Gunning and the Hellion. We also used the same scoring system, total time plus penalties.

The reason we shot the same target was simple, first so we didn’t waste our resources and second to record empirical data, remember that from my comments on TD1? The photo below is of Pat’s target and scores after shooting these four courses of fire twice.

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TD2 also had the two remaining blocks of instruction in the Sentinel course, “Your Home/Your Fortress” and “Fighting.” These were very good presentations with a lot of discussion on defending your home and a lot of interaction in the fighting presentation with Pat showing us some basic boxing moves and then pairing us up with partners and us working on skills together. I found all four blocks of instruction worthwhile and very informative on subjects that we all need to know in being that agent in charge of our own protection detail.

We ended the day with Pat setting up some steel targets and shooting some drills that he is famous for on YouTube, like the Grinder, Steven Gilcreast’s “Blaze X” and also Grid of Fire, and a new drill he set up during lunch called “The Scanner.” This Scanner drill has a lot going on as you can see from the photo below. I can’t give the entire drill away, that would ruin the surprise when you run it the first time, but needless to say, I am going to steal this one. Of course, I will give the appropriate reference as to where I got it.

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We also had one steel target set up to time our presentation to first shot from standing and facing the target, then after turning 180° in both directions and lastly, while making a lateral move to the left.

We finished TD2 the same as TD1, with an overview of what we accomplished and a short question and answer session.

For this course, I used my every day carry gun and equipment and ran all drills from concealment. My Sig Sauer P320 X-Carry ran flawlessly with Federal American Eagle 115gr TSJ Syntech ammunition. I also used my Henry’s Holsters AIWB set up with a Sig Sauer brand magazine pouch.

In summary, the Sentinel course helped me to identify some areas in which my skills need some improvement and that’s what it’s all about. Seriously, having those performance-based training objectives helps me to be introspective and realistic about my own skills, it also allows me to set goals in order to make improvements in those skills.

Sentinel was my last course of the year, and honestly, I wish it had been my first. Pat McNamara is an excellent trainer and he constantly offered tips to all of us so we could improve our performance. I tend to gravitate toward trainers like Pat, and this is a course that I recommend without reservation.

You can find the TMAC’s Inc training schedule by clicking on the link below and if you are in Florida, consider joining us for the T.A.P.S. Pistol/Carbine Combo course on March 3rd and 4th at Firearms Training Club of America in Lakeland.

https://squareup.com/store/tmacs-inc

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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“On My Soapbox” – Open Carry while at Gun School.

Something new to Trigger Control Dot Org is an “On My Soapbox” blog. Hey, whenever I feel that I have something to say of importance about the firearms training industry in general and or some of the Gun Pretenders/Keyboard Operators who are in the industry I’ll press something, so stay tuned…

Open Carry while at Gun School:

As many of you know I go to Gun School a lot, and mostly as a student, not an instructor candidate. Candidly, I have all of the Instructor ratings that I need or want, but if one interests me in the future, I might take the course; however, it must fit with my long-term training goals and it cannot be an “In name only Instructor course.”

Edited to Add: One of the readers reminded me that many people have the attention span of a gnat and that they can only read and comprehend 140 characters at a time before losing interest. (Sorry Twitterville, it was his comment, not mine.) Regardless, he suggested that I drop some sort of hint that this is not about the competitive shooting sports and I said that I would make a slight emendation to the post. Here goes:

“This blog posting is not directed toward the Competitive Shooting Sports.”

If given a choice, I will always run a course as a student with my handgun in a concealment holster. Sometimes that is not an option based upon the policies of the instructor, the range or the academy that I am attending, so we make adjustments for those policies and get in the training.

One of my mentors, Tom Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services has all of his students and instructor candidates work exclusively from concealment unless they are a sworn law enforcement officer or possibly a licensed armed security guard and normally carry their handgun in a security holster. I follow this same methodology and have for a long time because it is the responsible way to train the armed citizen.

Let’s face it, a significant majority of Americans carry their handguns concealed. How do I know this you ask? Just travel to one or a couple of the forty-five (45) states that allow some form of open carry, sit down with your latte and do some “people watching” at the food court in the local shopping mall, or go to a Walmart for a cultural experience (There’s always a lot of good people watching at Walmart) and look around at the waistbands of all the people that you see. I’m betting that you won’t see many handguns being openly carried. In fact, in the last several years I have traveled the country extensively (Eighteen different States) attending and also teaching courses, and I can count on one hand how many handguns I have seen attached to the waistband of people in those states.

FYI: I was just in three open carry states weekend before last and saw absolutely NOBODY open carrying except the people in Gun School while on the range.

So, what is the point for a responsibly armed citizen to pay all the money to attend Gun School and then run their handgun from open carry when they never carry that way? Again, let’s be real, and if your argument is I live in an open carry state, I have pretty much rendered that argument invalid. There are very few folks who practice open carry walking among us, most people carry concealed and that is just a stone-cold fact proven by my research that I continue to do each time I travel to an open carry state.

Seriously, if you go to Gun School and don’t run your handgun from concealment you are only cheating yourself out of all the repetitions that you would get from concealment. These are repetitions in the fundamentals that go a long way in building a level of automaticity into your motor cortex. (Psst, that means inside your brain because there is no such thing as muscle memory. I still shake my head each time I hear a Gun Pretender say these words or a Keyboard Operator write the words, muscle memory.)

OK, now to Mr. or Ms. Big-Time Firearms Instructor/Keyboard Operator I hit a nerve underneath your paper-thin skin didn’t I? Yeah, I meant to do just that, you can believe it. You say that running from concealment is not “Tacticool” enough for you and it doesn’t make for a good photo to add to your Facebook or Instagram account, right? You must be the type of Instructor/Keyboard Operator who trains students for photo opportunities and you offer little to no real hands-on training. Sadly I have seen it too many times at Gun School with the Instructor taking photos and uploading to his Facebook page not paying attention to his students. Oh, by the way, you Instructors/Keyboard Operators who don’t carry a gun all the time, John Farnam one of the top trainers in the whole shootin’ match from Defense Training International refers to you as “Gun Pretenders” and so do I, it kinda fits, now doesn’t it? (I just love that description, Gun Pretenders.)

It is your responsibility Mr. or Ms. Big-Time Firearms Instructor/Keyboard Operator to make your students do the hard stuff while in training so it will be easier for them to become adaptive to the situation when the fight is on, and believe me they will need to adapt very quickly or their loved ones might just be planning a funeral.

I cannot be any more clear than this, open carry on the range at Gun School is just a bunch of “Tacticool” asshattery and those who perpetuate it are typically the ones that have a bunch of paid followers on Facebook, Instagram, and various other social media outlets or better yet, an Internet Radio Show. The crap that some of these people teach has unfortunately been codified in the training community for years by those who probably shouldn’t be instructors in the first place. Yeah, I just said that and I can feel your anger, I am very easy to find if you want to talk about the butt-hurt that statement has caused you.

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Oh boy, I bet this wins me some friends among the Keyboard Operators in the community, not! This just in, I don’t care.

By the way, I will continue to call B.S. on the asshattery I see on social media and at Gun School each and every time I see it, and that you can bank on.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: SIG SAUER Academy P320 Armorer, M400 Armorer & Low Light Pistol Instructor Course(s), conducted August 14, 15, 17 & 18, 2017

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On Sunday August 13th I flew up to New Hampshire to attend three courses at SIG SAUER Academy in Epping.

All three of my flights on Southwest Airlines, the two going and the non-stop coming home from New Hampshire went off without a hitch. I got upgraded to a Subaru Outback and logistically everything went very well. Once again I stayed at the Hampton Inn & Suites in Exeter. The hotel is very nice, I took advantage of the pool and the Jacuzzi this time and the complimentary buffet style breakfast buffet each morning is very good. The staff, to include the General Manager were all very professional and attentive to a few special requests that I made before and upon arrival. I will stay here each and every time that I visit SIG SAUER Academy.

Dinner at The Holy Grail twice and Telly’s once along with a pizza from New England Pizza kept me full. If you are in the greater Epping/Exeter Metropolitan area, you must experience The Holy Grail. It is a restaurant and pub inside an old church not far from the Academy. Telly’s specializes in pizza and other American fare, and New England Pizza in Exeter has a white pizza that is pretty darn good, especially when you put bacon and some other toppings on it. The Hanaford Supermarket was my other “go to” while I was there, along with the Hammersmith Sandwich Company for lunch while in class.

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Upon my arrival at the SIG SAUER Academy and Pro Shop late Sunday morning I noticed that the P320 X-Carry was on sale and I “attempted” to buy one with my student discount, one of the sales guys told me they had three of them in stock and I was all excited; however, after he came back from the storage room I was crushed because they were out of stock. At least I was able to put a deposit on one and will have it shipped to Florida when they are available. Still no P320 X-VTAC as of yet, Lipsey’s is shipping them out to their dealers, but not the Pro Shop. Had one of those been in stock I would have bought it instead, so I am 0-2 in gun purchases while attending courses at the Academy. On the bright side, I was able to buy a lot of accessories with no state sales tax and at the student discount price, score!

Important Note: I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention how professional and courteous the Academy Staff and Pro Shop employees are, those folks are always eager to help.

Let’s get to the course reviews …

TD1 for me started Monday morning I started in Classroom #1 in the Indoor Pistol Range Facility with Chris “Cav” Cavallaro for the P320 Armorer Course. “Cav” is the Subject Matter Expert on campus for the Armorer courses, and that means that he is in charge of the Program of Instruction for the Armorer courses. The P320 is a very simple weapon system to work on for both the operator and the certified armorer. Candidly, while attending the course there was no running from the elephant in the room, we talked about the voluntary upgrade announced by Sig Sauer on August 8th, 2017 and our Instructor was open and honest about all the things that the company is doing to remedy the situation. The voluntary upgrade will include a small amount of CNC work on the frame (That is the metal part inside the grip module) and they will be adding a disconnector and also swapping the current trigger to one that is lighter in overall weight and with a balance point that is near the pivot pin. My questions were answered about this issue and I used a P320 in the Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course on Thursday & Friday with no issues whatsoever. Parts for certified armorers are readily available by calling in to customer service and ordering them direct over the phone. I like that versus sending in an order form and waiting for months to get parts shipped to you. (Not mentioning any manufacturers in particular)

Overall, Monday’s course was excellent, and oh by the way, it was attended by several factory people and a couple Academy Instructors that interjected their insider knowledge of the gun and what is going on inside the factory to get ready for the influx of guns coming in for the voluntary upgrade. We were told to not leave with questions unasked and all of us got in our share. By the way, successfully passing the course (There is a test) gives the graduate a three year certification.

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TD2 on Tuesday was all about the M400. You would know this as the AR15 platform rifle. My first exposure to this type of rifle came 35 years ago this month when I joined “The Green Machine.” Many of the things taught came right back like I was in my Unit Armorers course while I was in the Army. We didn’t break the gun all the way down back in the day, but I knew how to and “Cav” showed us some techniques that really helped when disassembling and more importantly reassembling the rifle.

I enjoyed all the repetitions we got in working on the rifle, similar to the P320 course we were not left wanting more and all of our questions were answered. Same as the P320 armorers course, successfully passing this course (There is also a test) gives the graduate a three year certification. One important note, this course is hopefully switching to a two-day format with a one-day re-certification in the not too distant future.

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Photo: My instructor for both Monday and Tuesday’s courses, Chris “Cav” Cavallaro summoning the power of Thor!

Additionally on Monday and Tuesday I had the pleasure of meeting and training with Ofer and Amir from Be’er-Sherva, Israel. These two guys are living the motto, “Live Free Or Die” each and every day of their lives. Think about that, and let it sink in. They are at a constant state of war with all the terrorism in their tiny country, amazing when you spend some time in thought about it.

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On Wednesday morning I got to spend some time with Steve Gilcreast, my Instructor from the Master Pistol Instructor Course I attended in June. Steve put me on the shot timer through his 100 round warm-up exercise, and I must admit that I didn’t do as well as I expect out of myself, and I had to hit the gong in Area 51, but I had a great time. Steve is a thinker and a doer who can translate his points across to students very well, anytime spent with him one-on-one is time well spent because of his knowledge, skills and his attitude. Steve is one of the top firearms instructors that I have ever trained with, period.

Back to the gong issue, in case you don’t know, if you don’t have a round chambered and you press the trigger on your gun and your gun goes click when it was supposed to go bang, (Dead Man’s Gun) you and your partner must run to one of the gongs on campus and you must smash the gong ten (10) times with authority using a hammer and then run back to your training area. (Your training partner goes along with you for moral support) It could also be that your magazine was not seated correctly, or a few other reasons. Yes, I had my moment with the gong while the students in the Master Rifle Instructor Course observed. Oh, and the hammer was missing so I had to make due with a BFR. I posted this photo for accountability in the photo album that I created on my business Facebook page at Trigger Control Dot Org, and I also posted one on my Instagram page @TriggerContolDotOrg – this one below is for accountability here.

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On Wednesday afternoon I got to see the factory from the inside, it was nice of one of the engineers to invite me in for a peek. Nothing to see here, no cameras allowed in the factory.

Lastly on Wednesday afternoon/evening I was able to go to Stratham Hill Park and find the very rock where Robert Todd Lincoln stood and read the Declaration of Independence to the citizens of New Hampshire on July 4th, 1860, just before his father Abraham Lincoln became the 16th President of the United States. Pretty cool stuff to stand on that rock, no kidding , it gave me goose bumps.

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After I stopped at the Lincoln Rock, I climbed the rest of the way up the Lincoln Trail (It’s pretty darn steep) to the top of the hill and found the Forest Fire Service Tower. I had to climb to the top all seventy-seven steps and seven flights to get a look at the surrounding area, and it was quite a sight. I highly recommend you go to Stratham Hill Park when visiting SIG SAUER Academy to experience these things, I can assure you that it is an experience I won’t soon forget. You can find out more information on Stratham Hill Park by clicking on this link to their Facebook page. Stratham Hill Park on Facebook

TD3 for me started in Classroom #9 in the Indoor Pistol Range Facility on campus with New Hampshire native Todd Moriarity and Nick Brazeau from Montreal, Canada in the Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course. We had six students/instructor candidates and that made for a really great course.

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Photo: For this course I ran my Surefire P2ZX Fury Combat Light (500 lumens) with a Surefire V85A holster system. I also brought my Surefire E2D LED Defender Ultra (500/5 lumens) as well. Both worked well and a few of my new best friends wanted to try my bezel down holster. Once I left the course I purchased a Surefire Y300 Ultra High Dual Output LED Flashlight as Todd had one and it looked promising for a back-up flashlight.

By the way, 500 lumens is plenty enough for anyone. These new flashlights with 1,000 lumens, yeah, they get way too hot running courses of fire like this and also they end up giving you a lot of back-splash if you are to close to cover and have poor technique, What happens is you will end up momentarily blinding yourself with the light bouncing back in your eyes. (So yes, there is such a thing as too many lumens)

After a short classroom session on Thursday morning going over some of the different flashlight options out there and of course the safety rules, we all hit the Indoor Pistol Range with our frangible ammunition and got to work. Like all SIG SAUER Academy Instructors, Todd is a master at teaching to the adult learning theorems. Before teaching each technique Todd would explain, and demonstrate the technique and then we would imitate it dry-fire and then practice it live-fire. This goes to the core of the SIG SAUER Academy training methodology of E.D.I.P. or Explain, Demonstrate, Imitate, Practice. (I’ll add in Test for E.D.I.P.T. and call it good)

By the way, I really can’t share the course of fire with you, it’s not something that they give out; however, I take really good notes and have it down on paper, but that is the exception, not a one of my fellow Instructors were taking notes on the range during the exercises, I just don’t have that good of memory to not take notes.

On Thursday, Todd taught us a new technique that was developed by Academy Instructor Jim Meyers. It is referred to as the “Jimmy Meyers Technique.” This technique is similar to the Rogers-Surefire; however, it is different in the fact that you turn the wrist of your support hand 90° so the back of your hand is up, and then you place the thumb of your support hand in contact with the grip of the handgun under the thumb of your master hand. It is an interesting technique, one that I certainly need to practice some more in order to become a whole lot better at.

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Photo: Todd and Nick going to put out a little fire inside the range on Thursday afternoon caused by the powder from the frangible ammunition we were using while shooting steel. It was only a little smoke, nothing major.

The Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course also requires the student/instructor candidate to preform a teach-back to the other students and cadre. On Thursday just before we broke for the day, we were assigned ours and my partner and I were assigned to T.E.A.M. teach the Modified FBI and the Neck Index technique.

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Photo: The Indoor Pistol Range at SIG SAUER Academy in low-light, that is not my camera flash, the lens is picking up light from in back of the range, once the shades were dropped it was pitch black inside that range, a perfect training environment for this course.

TD4 for me started on Friday morning again in the classroom with a review of the the previous days POI, and then were in the Indoor Rifle Range. My partner and I were selected to go first with our presentations. We prepared well and hit E.D.I.P. by explaining the technique and the history behind it, then we talked each other through the demonstration phase of the technique and then we had the other students/instructors candidates imitate and practice the technique. (Personal Note: I love doing teach-backs)

After each presentation we were given actionable feedback on what we did good, what we needed to work on and what we did really well. During the review, we were told that we did a great job by our peers and the cad re. They made a couple comments about how we worked as a T.E.A.M. and that is exactly what T.E.A.M. teaching is all about. (Positive-Improvement-Positive or the “sandwich method” of evaluation is alive and well at SIG SAUER Academy)

Additionally Todd and Nick set up a drill for us to practice all the things that we learned on Thursday in a low-light/no-light environment. We had to start by moving to cover and then find and engage our threat with two to five live rounds. (The SSA-1 Brett Target gets shot a lot at SIG SAUER Academy) During this drill, we were had to move to a new piece of cover and perform a tactical reload when necessary, and then try a different technique, we got to do this twice going one direction and then moving backwards through the course in the other direction. I found this to be very beneficial because it allowed me to try just about all of the techniques from some unorthodox positions, e.g., kneeling, supine and laying on my side, and of course standing.

This brought us to lunch time. Once we had our bellies full of Hammersmith Sandwich Company sandwiches we got suited up for some training in a shoot-house. There are several single family homes on campus that the Academy uses for this purpose, they also have a series of Conex style containers set up for this type of training as well. The house we were in was nicknamed “Red Feathers.” Seriously, it should have been named “Bat Feathers” because there was a bat in the house that we had to eradicate during this evolution.

Each one of us got to clear the house as an individual and then as part of a T.E.A.M., Todd said this was not to grade us on our tactics, but to make sure we were using sound flashlight discipline, both he and Nick gave us excellent feedback on our flashlight use and gave us tips to make us better with our tactics, I found this to be an excellent evolution.

Funny Story: When I was picked to be the “bad guy” students John and Victor, both sworn law enforcement officers entered the house searching for me and Victor called out, “Gordon, are you in here? We got a warrant for you, come on out boy.” I had to do everything I could to keep from laughing. My new best friend Victor said he did it hoping that I would give my position away, that failed, but these two sworn LEO’s cleared this house like a boss using sound flashlight discipline and T.E.A.M. tactics.

One thing I enjoyed about Todd and Nick’s teaching style was this, after each evolution on the range or in the shoot-house we did a short review. Todd asked us what we liked and disliked, making us think about the techniques that we used and how we liked them in that particular situation. We got plenty of repetitions and both Todd and Nick gave us personal coaching to make sure we were preforming the techniques properly and with sounds tactics, with a student-to-instructor ratio of 3:1, that is easy to do.

At the end of the course may of us suggested adding a third day and incorporating the long gun into the POI. That could be in the plans, Todd is responsible for the POI for this course and he said that he has thought about that as a possibility.

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Photo: Sig Sauer Frangible Ammunition. The Course of fire was true to the number at about 500, rounds, we used this is the indoor pistol range; however, on the second day of the course we were able to use FMJ ammunition. SIG SAUER Academy has plenty of ammunition, if you show up they will give you student pricing on the ammunition. We all arrived with a good working knowledge of the techniques, what we did here is refined the techniques and preformed a teach-back as all Instructor level courses should require. Now, it is up to us as Instructors to transfer this knowledge to others. As with the other courses, upon successful completion of this course course, graduates are given a three year certification.

Overall, the Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course conducted at SIG SAUER Academy was excellent, I really enjoyed it and learned a lot of subtle nuances that make the techniques work well in a live fire situation. It tests your gear and your TTP’s under stress and that’s what you must do in training. I would highly recommend this course to an agency instructor or anyone who teaches these techniques to the responsibly armed citizen.

To find out more about taking an Armorer Certification course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Armorer Certification Courses

To find out more about taking an Instructor Development course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Instructor Development Courses

To find out more about taking a Shooting Development course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Shooting Development Courses

To find out more about taking a Competitive Shooting Development course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Competitive Shooting Development Courses

To find out more about taking a course in a certain specialty at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Specialty Training Courses

To find out more about taking a course from a Guest Instructor, e.g., Mike Pannone or one of the many nationally and internationally known Instructors they bring in to the Academy each year, click on: Guest Instructor Courses

Important Note: Your tuition includes free loan of firearms (In most courses, not all), holsters, safety glasses and hearing protection at the Epping, NH location.

Now, if you guessed that I am planning another trip back to SIG SAUER Academy, you would be correct, stay tuned!

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!