The Trigger Control Dot Org 2017 Year in Review!

Twenty Seventeen was nothing short of a whirlwind. The numbers really don’t tell the entire story, but you are gonna get ’em anyway.

I taught thirty-eight NRA Student and Instructor courses, four USCCA Instructor courses and five USCCA Student courses, eight closed enrollment courses of my own curriculum for Law Enforcement Officers, and twelve courses of my own curriculum for various groups of Responsibly Armed Citizens.

That is a total of sixty-seven courses, down six from last years seventy-three. I had some help, thanks to all my friends who gave their time to assist me with some of the courses I taught both here in Florida and elsewhere. I would be remiss if I didn’t thank my hosts as well. Without them, none of this would be possible especially the out of state courses.

My student/instructor candidate count is still being tabulated. Unfortunately, I have to count my signed waivers to get an accurate number due to a computer crash earlier this year. The number will be comfortably above eight hundred, down from last years count of nine hundred thirty-six.

Here is the really fun part, last year I was able to attend nineteen training courses as a student or instructor candidate, and I even took a hit of pepper spray for a training video as well. This just in, I think my friend Mike enjoyed seeing me in pain.

Below is a complete listing of the courses I attended along with the locations. Those with hyperlinks in the listing have course reviews posted in this blog, if you click on the link you will be directed to each of them individually.

April 1-2 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Combative Pistol Course; OK Corral Gun Club in Okeechobee, Florida.

April 15 – Assault Counter Tactics – Vehicle Counter Ambush Course; American Police Hall of Fame in Titusville, Florida.

May 9-10 – GLOCK Operator Course; GLOCK/GSSF Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia.

May 19-20-21 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Advanced Combative Pistol Three Day Format; Oconee County Sheriff’s Office in Watkinsville, Georgia.

June 13-14-15 – General Dynamics Simunitions® Scenario Instructor and Safety Certification Course; Titusville Police Department in Titusville, Florida.

June 26-27 – SIG SAUER Academy Master Pistol Instructor Course; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

July 22 – Tactical Combat Casualty Couse (T.C.C.C.) On Point Safety and Defense; Wyoming Antelope Club in Clearwater, Florida.

August 14- 15, 17-18 – SIG SAUER Academy P320 Armorer, M400®/M16/M4/AR15 Armorer, Low Light Pistol Instructor Course; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

August 26-27 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Advanced Firearms Instructor Development Course; FPF Training, Stone Quarry Range in Culpeper, Virginia.

September 9-10 – Handgun Combatives Vehicle Combatives Course; Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office in Coffeyville, Kansas.

October 7-8 – Ken Hackathorn Advanced Pistol Course Aztec Training Services; Burro Canyon Shooting Park in Azuza, California.

October 23 – SIG SAUER Academy Bullets and Vehicles; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

November 11-12 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Instructor Reunion Conference; BDC Gun Room in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

November 17-18-19 – Defense Training International John and Vicki Farnam Advanced Defensive Handgun and Instructor Course; On Guard Defense in New Plymouth, Ohio.

December 4-5-6 – NRA Practical Pistol Coach School; NRA Headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia.

December 16-17 – Pat McNamara, TMACS, Inc. Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail; Panteao Productions and Sandlapper Rifle Range and Gun Club in Swansea, South Carolina.

Altogether, I traveled in and out of fourteen different airports, not including airports where I changed planes. Added nearly ten thousand miles to my vehicle for business purposes and rented fifteen vehicles from Budget, Dollar, and Enterprise. (Never again from the last two, I’ll stick with Budget Fastbreak) Had to rent a car in order to make the last leg home from Atlanta after attending Dave Spaulding’s Vehicle Combatives course in Kansas because Hurricane Irene closed all of the airports in Florida, that trip became known as “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.”

Additionally, I earned a lot of hotel points last year with both IHG and Hilton staying eighty-five nights in hotel rooms from Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Hilton Garden Inn, and Hampton Inn & Suites.

In early October I signed a consulting contract with a television network and I am negotiating one with a production studio as I type this blog post. Like it or not, traveling to Southern California will once again be part of the agenda in twenty eighteen.

Last year I also developed two new courses that moving forward will be part of my course catalog. One is an all-new one-day Handgun Essentials course and the other is also a one-day course that will be shot almost exclusively on steel, the name of this course is still in the works, but I kind of like “Steel Skill Drills Challenge.” This course will challenge your skills greatly and will also be somewhat of a stress inoculator with each and every drill using a shot timer, and yes, there will be a lot of movement as well.

It was a down year for book reading, I only read ten books last year and I am finishing my eleventh. The list is as follows:

T.A.P.S. Tactical Application of Practical Shooting – Patrick McNamara
Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail – Patrick McNamara
Mission America – Straight Talk About Military Transition – LTC (Retired) Scott Mann
Handgun Combatives – Dave Spaulding
Forensic Analysis of the April 11, 1986 FBI Firefight – W. French Anderson
Motor Learning and Performance: Instructors’ Guide – Richard A. Schmidt
The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills – Daniel  Coyle
With Winning In Mind – Lenny Bassham
The Farnam Method of Defensive Handgunning – John S. Farnam
Teaching Women To Shoot; A Law Enforcement Instructor’s Guide – Vicki Farnam
Guns & Warriors DTI Quips Volume I – John S. Farnam

I saved this one for last because a friend and mentor signed it and sent it to me as a gift:

Straight Talk on Armed Defense – What the Experts Want You to Know, Edited by Massad Ayoob with Dr. William Aprill, Dr. Alexis Artwohl, Massad Ayoob, Detective Spencer Blue, Ron Borsch, Craig “Southnarc” Douglas, Jim Fleming, Esq., Tom Givens, Marty Hayes, JD, John Hearne, Chief Harvey Hedden, Dr. Anthony Simone.

I’ll wind this up with some of the best news I received in a long time came last week from Go Daddy, they finally unlocked my domain name and instead of pointing at my Facebook page it will be back to a real website. What an ordeal after over a year of problems with a web design company who took control of my website and basically held me hostage. Look for the all-new website to launch later this month!

For now, I’ll leave you with the words of Pat McNamara…

Getchusum!!!

Ready-Ready-Break!!!

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: Pat McNamara, TMACS, Inc. Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail; December 16th & 17th, 2017 – Swansea, South Carolina (Host: Panteao Productions)

Earlier this year I finished reading Pat McNamara’s book, T.A.P.S. – Tactical Application of Practical Shooting. Immediately after that, I started  reading, “Sentinel – Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail.” Once I finished that book I knew that I wanted to attend a course with Pat sometime in the future, better yet host him for a course here in Florida. (We’ve got that scheduled, T.A.P.S. Pistol & Carbine Combo course on March 3rd and 4th, 2018 here in Lakeland)

Checking the TMACS, Inc training schedule, I found a Sentinel course listed in South Carolina at Panteao Productions and signed up immediately. So, two weeks ago I set my GPS to the SandLapper Rifle Range & Gun Club and arrived in the mid-afternoon the day prior to the course. Upon my arrival, I was greeted with a friendly Hello, and given a gift bag for attending the course, I thought this was a nice gesture from the Panteao Productions folks, if I lived in the Columbia area, I would definitely become a member of their gun club. My reasoning to stop at the facility first was it was on the way and I could gauge how long it would take me to get there the next morning from my hotel.

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Next, I was off to my hotel just outside Fort Jackson to get checked in and then like magic, my GPS mysteriously found its way to Palmetto State Armory, Sportsman’s Warehouse, and Academy Sports. It must be nice to have all three places within a few miles of one another where you live, and if you can’t find something to buy in these three places, you’re not an outdoors person or a gun person.

On Saturday morning I woke up to 28° weather, yes 28° weather. A little cold for this Florida boy, but it was all mind over matter, I didn’t mind, so it didn’t matter. I grabbed some fruit, chicken and a few bottles of water at the local Walmart, filled my gas tank, and made the twenty-minute drive down to Swansea arriving a little before 8:00am.

When I got on the property I was once again greeted by the Panteao staff and I signed a standard participation waiver and one for Panteao Productions itself because this course was being taped for a new DVD that they will release soon. You can find more information about that by clicking on the Panteao Productions hyperlinks I have embedded in this posting.

 

(Photo courtesy of Panteao Productions)

When I arrived at the range I was greeted by Pat with a firm handshake and a thank you for coming. I took the opportunity to thank him for setting up a course with me in Florida and then I was off to make sure I had my gear squared away. As each student arrived, Pat made a point to greet them, thank them for coming and he also asked where everyone came from as well. We had students from “Free America” and some from “UnFree America.” I believe one person flew in from California and one from Chicago, one or two from Virginia and the rest were all southerners from states like Alabama, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and yours truly from Florida.

Once it warmed up a little, Pat started with a short bio and then explained his philosophy on Outcome Based Training versus Performance Based Training.

Outcome-Based Training: Execution with consideration of the consequences, will I succeed, or will I fail? Outcome-Based Training is how many, how much, how fast.

Performance Based Training: How well can I perform a task. Performance is measured by doing what we can with what we have. It also requires the student to be introspective and to perform an honest self-assessment of where your skills are, not where you wish they were. The probability of achieving the outcome you desire will increase once you let go of the need to have it.

The Sentinel course is a foundational skills course with pistol and carbine at the forefront. There are also four additional blocks of instruction on Vehicle Preparedness/Urban Survival Skills, Combat Strength Training, Your House/Your Fortress, and Fighting.

Pat then went over his interpretation of the four safety rules, and then we started with getting some dope with our rifle optics. (Pro Tip: Show up to Gun School with your rifle properly zeroed.)

After each of us had a zero we then confirmed our zero with our iron sights. Moving forward we performed a simple “call your shot” drill from the standing position and then we shot five rounds resting our barrels on a fixed object, turning the rifle 90° and lastly using a forced parallax with our optic.

I took a photo of Pat’s target and posted it below so you can see his “storyboard.” He uses this storyboard to collect empirical data from his training sessions and takes a photo of it so he can refer to it in the future, this is similar to a system that I use; however, Pat takes it to a whole new level. As you can see this target has all of his zeroing information.

  1. Date
  2. Location
  3. Distance
  4. Temperature
  5. Wind Speed/Direction
  6. Rifle or Weapon System
  7. Ammunition
  8. Optic

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Next, we shot a “BRM Payoff” this is a 200-point scored course of fire done on four NRA B-8 bulls-eye centers from standing sitting, kneeling and prone. I have an excellent video of Pat transitioning through these positions that I will post shortly to my Facebook and Instagram accounts, links to those are at the bottom.

My BRM Payoff scores were 181 and 185, incremental improvements are good if you are focused on performance-based training and I was happy with these scores; however, even though they showed incremental improvement, there is room for a whole lot more.

This brought us to the first mini-block of instruction on vehicle preparedness. Most of us attending the course were surprised to learn what Pat has for his everyday driver, I would have never guessed it. Again, without giving away the entire POI or the contents of his book, let’s say Pat keeps a “Trunk Gun” or “Truck Gun” in whatever he is driving with an “I’m coming to get you” bag and another bag that he called his “Batman Bag.” The second bag being somewhat of a “Go Bag” with a few hours supply of survival essentials, a little food, water and some other things that you would need in case you got stranded or you were going to help a loved one who was stranded.

Next Pat talked about “dryfiring your vehicle” making sure you can debus in a hurry if you need to and that you should think of ways to escape, remember that mobility = survivability. Dryfiring your vehicle is particularly important when you rent a car or use one that you typically don’t drive much.

Once we finished lunch we started with some basic drills with the pistol.

Remember what the basics of pistol shooting are, sight alignment and controlling the trigger properly. All of us including Pat started at the seven-yard line from a ready position shooting single shots using the hole of our first shot as an aiming point for the rest. We then shot controlled pairs and ended with strong hand only.

It’s important to note that Pat is one of those trainers who could be training military units at Fort Bragg, or a SWAT Team one day and responsibly armed citizens the next, he is a rare breed who understands the differences in training these diverse groups of people and what their training needs are, unfortunately, many who make the transition from military to civilian life do not and they hang out a shingle professing their skills and they fail miserably.

We then had a block of instruction on Combat Strength Training.

The program breaks down tasks into four categories:

  1. Strength: How Much
  2. Power: Rate of Force Production; How Much, How Fast
  3. Speed & Quickness: Speed = Fast in One Direction/Quickness = Fast in Multiple Directions
  4. Hypertrophy: Muscular Development

My takeaway was that Combat Strength Training is not about building rock hard abs or a huge chest and biceps, it is about self-preservation and creating some longevity. It is also about making sure you are “fit to fight.”

TD1 wrapped up with an overview of what we accomplished and a short question and answer session.

We started TD2, at the same time, and with the same BRM Payoff Drill we did on TD1, my score was 188. Once again an incremental improvement and I was pleased with that because you are either getting better or you’re getting worse, you never stay the same.

We then cleared our rifles and shot a “National Match Mod” pistol 75-point course of fire twice for a score. This course of fire used a standard IPSC target using the following scoring method, minus 1pt for C zone hits, minus 2pts for D zone hits and -5 for misses. Make note of that because the next few drills had the same scoring method.

I found the National Match Mod to be an extremely challenging course of fire especially since it was shot at 50 and 25 yards. My 53-year old eyes are not as sharp as they used to be and so my first run was not very good, I only managed a 64. Then I spied what Pat had done to his target, and now I know why he always keeps a sharpie in his pocket. Pat had outlined the A zone of his target, in doing so it made a huge difference for me, I scored a 71 on the second go around. Little things like that give yourself an advantage and if it is within the rules, why not use it?

Our next course of fire was a version of his “Running and Gunning” drill. This was also timed and scored on an IPSC target as well. A good way to understand “Running and Gunning” is to watch the man himself explain and demonstrate it in the link I have provided here. Running and Gunning

We then shot “The Hellion” this one requires you to be a thinker and not just a shooter. I haven’t seen it on any of his videos, and because it is something that is difficult to explain in the written word, I’ll just do a video of it in a couple weeks and post it to my page and edit this blog posting with a link.

Lastly, we shot the four-position rifle timed course of fire at the same IPSC target used for the National Match Mod, Running and Gunning and the Hellion. We also used the same scoring system, total time plus penalties.

The reason we shot the same target was simple, first so we didn’t waste our resources and second to record empirical data, remember that from my comments on TD1? The photo below is of Pat’s target and scores after shooting these four courses of fire twice.

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TD2 also had the two remaining blocks of instruction in the Sentinel course, “Your Home/Your Fortress” and “Fighting.” These were very good presentations with a lot of discussion on defending your home and a lot of interaction in the fighting presentation with Pat showing us some basic boxing moves and then pairing us up with partners and us working on skills together. I found all four blocks of instruction worthwhile and very informative on subjects that we all need to know in being that agent in charge of our own protection detail.

We ended the day with Pat setting up some steel targets and shooting some drills that he is famous for on YouTube, like the Grinder, Steven Gilcreast’s “Blaze X” and also Grid of Fire, and a new drill he set up during lunch called “The Scanner.” This Scanner drill has a lot going on as you can see from the photo below. I can’t give the entire drill away, that would ruin the surprise when you run it the first time, but needless to say, I am going to steal this one. Of course, I will give the appropriate reference as to where I got it.

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We also had one steel target set up to time our presentation to first shot from standing and facing the target, then after turning 180° in both directions and lastly, while making a lateral move to the left.

We finished TD2 the same as TD1, with an overview of what we accomplished and a short question and answer session.

For this course, I used my every day carry gun and equipment and ran all drills from concealment. My Sig Sauer P320 X-Carry ran flawlessly with Federal American Eagle 115gr TSJ Syntech ammunition. I also used my Henry’s Holsters AIWB set up with a Sig Sauer brand magazine pouch.

In summary, the Sentinel course helped me to identify some areas in which my skills need some improvement and that’s what it’s all about. Seriously, having those performance-based training objectives helps me to be introspective and realistic about my own skills, it also allows me to set goals in order to make improvements in those skills.

Sentinel was my last course of the year, and honestly, I wish it had been my first. Pat McNamara is an excellent trainer and he constantly offered tips to all of us so we could improve our performance. I tend to gravitate toward trainers like Pat, and this is a course that I recommend without reservation.

You can find the TMAC’s Inc training schedule by clicking on the link below and if you are in Florida, consider joining us for the T.A.P.S. Pistol/Carbine Combo course on March 3rd and 4th at Firearms Training Club of America in Lakeland.

https://squareup.com/store/tmacs-inc

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Join the discussion on Trigger Control Dot Org by following me on Facebook at

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Course Review: Defense Training International Advanced Defensive Handgun & Instructor Courses; November 17th – 19th, 2017 – New Plymouth, Ohio

“The time to prepare for your next shooting is now.” – John Farnam

Recently I attended the Defense Training International (John & Vicki Farnam) Advanced Defensive Handgun and the DTI Instructor Course in New Plymouth, Ohio.

Many of you probably know that John Farnam and Ken Hackathorn were two of the very first Instructors to take their Program of Instruction (POI) on the road and train Law Enforcement Officers, Active Duty Servicemembers and Responsibly Armed Citizens back in the 1970’s and if you didn’t, you do now. John and his wife Vicki, who have been training together as husband and wife for the past thirty-one (31) years are “Industry Giants” and if you have not trained with them yet, you really need to make that happen.

In case you didn’t know, John is also a long time advisory board member of Marty and Gila Hayes’ Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network along with other industry giants like Massad Ayoob, Jim Fleming, Tom Givens, Emanuel Kapelsohn, and Dennis Tueller. (In full disclosure I am a member of the network as well)

Let’s get to the course information. Friday morning, bright and early my friend Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC and I met the Farnam’s for breakfast and then we took the thirty-minute drive to the range so we could get started promptly at 9:00am. The weekend schedule was as follows, DTI Advanced Defensive Handgun Course on Friday and the DTI Instructor Course on Saturday and Sunday.

We started all three days in the classroom and on Friday John began discussing the art and science of defensive shooting and his “Four D’s of Fighting.”

  1. Divide his focus.
  2. Disrupt his plan.
  3. Disable his body.
  4. Destroy his will to fight.

During the classroom lecture, John talked a lot about the immediate aftermath of a self-defense shooting. His background as a law enforcement officer and a top industry trainer for somewhere north of forty (40) years gives him the credibility of a subject matter expert in this area. Folks, we’re talking about how to handle the 9-1-1 call, and how to answer questions from responding officers at the scene without talking yourself into a pair of handcuffs. (Never once was the words, “I was in fear for my life” spoken, I say this just to prove how infantile that expression has become)

While inside the classroom we also worked on some handgun retention and disarming techniques. John believes that it is more likely that you might have to disarm someone rather than shoot them, especially when you are within arms reach of your assailant. This is an area of Defensive Tactics that I wish more responsibly armed citizens would spend some time in training and not in the Dojo. In the law enforcement community, there are plenty of hours spent training these skills.

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(Photo: John demonstrating handgun disarms with Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC)

Once on the range, we were introduced to the Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Targets. These targets are absolutely diabolical, and shooting at them around simulated friendlies and or cover is not easy at all especially from distance. John and Vicki’s POI is all about moving off the line of force so you won’t be standing with your feet in cement while you present your handgun, and they get you moving after each four-round burst. Move and re-engage the threat/target from your new position and move while reloading as well. There is absolutely no need to stay stationary in a gunfight, that is unless you want to get shot.

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(Photo: Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Target)

The Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Targets have 8″ square paddles on them and in order to get them to rotate you must get your hits precisely in the right place and at precisely the right time so you can keep the inertia going. This can be both mentally and physically challenging as you’ve got to make every shot count, a missed shot breaks the inertia you’ve built up and next thing you know you have missed several times in a row because you get frustrated. All of us pitched our share shots during the course, it’s how we followed up those misses that counts.

During our range exercises, John emphasized his checklist that includes scanning and movement, reloading, creating distance from the threat, finding cover, checking yourself for injuries, accounting for everyone who might be hurt and finally calling 9-1-1. We practiced these things on the range after each drill and John would ask us key questions to prepare our “tape loop” for the immediate aftermath when law enforcement arrives on the scene.

It is worthwhile to note that John and Vicki run a hot range and will not allow a student or instructor candidate to ever holster an empty gun. An empty gun in a holster is useless and furthermore, it is dangerous because it adds to the administrative handling of the gun and most “accidents” happen during the administrative handling of guns. (Holstering) John’s range instructions are purposely vague, you have to be a thinker in his course and apply the instructions given into a plan to solve the problem.

The Farnam’s are also big on demonstrations as well. They believe as I do, a firearms instructor/teacher must be able to step up cold on demand and demonstrate drills to standard for their students. One has to be able to explain, demonstrate, and coach their students through drills, they must also give the “why” in training, most instructors can’t because they only regurgitate what they heard some instructor say or worse, what they read on the internet. If you heard it from John, he probably coined the phrase or developed the POI being taught.

During the Instructor course, John quoted these words many times as a way to emphasize the need to teach to the adult learning theorem, “What I hear, I forget; What I see, I remember; What I do, I understand.” He also made us keenly aware that feelings may be hurt during the course, it’s normal and part of the learning process. (My friend Steve mentioned that many sacred cows were slaughtered over the weekend)

On TD2 of the Instructor course, we got an excellent presentation from Vicki on teaching women. Her POI is based on her book, “Teaching Women to Shoot.” John and Vicki’s books can be purchased through the DTI Bookshelf at http://defense-training.com/

Additionally, the DTI Instructor course comes with a comprehensive Instructor Manual; however, you can find the POI well outlined in John’s book, “The Farnam Method of Defensive Handgunning.” I would highly suggest that you buy this book (And read it) before attending any DTI Handgun course, especially the Advanced Defensive Handgun course or the DTI Instructor course, you will thank me for that advice and you will be well prepared if you act on it.

Make sure that you prepare for some presentations as well, you will need to give them in front of your classmates cold on demand and with no preparation time. John and Vicki put pressure on their Instructors to perform. Thus you are assigned a subject and you must give a five-minute presentation and answer questions from the students and of course be prepared for Mabel to show up. (That’s Vicki’s alter ego)

AAA DTI Presentation

(Photo: My closing presentation last Sunday during the DTI Instructors Course)

In summary, I mentioned earlier that these two courses pushed me both mentally and physically and the qualification is not particularly easy. I was able to pass in seven (7) shots and some thirteen (13) seconds and change after a little warm-up and time to work out some frustration. My friend Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC stepped up and passed in six shots, cold on demand. That is pretty darn good shooting on those targets. The classroom presentations including developing a plan to deal with the immediate aftermath and the handgun retention/disarming techniques are a key piece of John’s POI and I am glad he had time to fit them into our course.

I strongly recommend that you attend a DTI course when John and Vicki are in your area, and if you are shooting 9mm, make sure to bring 147gr FMJ or some +P, they spin those diabolical Ravelin Group Rotators® quite well.

You can find the Defense Training International course schedule located in the hyperlink below.

http://defense-training.com/schedule/

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(Photo: DTI Staff Instructors and Students – Advanced Defensive Handgun Course/DTI Instructor Course; November 17th – 19th, 2017)

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: SIG SAUER Academy Bullets and Vehicles; October 23rd, 2017, Epping, New Hampshire.

After spending a couple absolutely beautiful fall days in Green Bay, Wisconsin teaching my Handgun Essentials course, it was back to SIG SAUER Academy for my third trip this year. (I previously attended the Master Pistol Instructor course in June and the P320 and M400/M-16/M4/AR-15 Rifle armorer’s course along with the Low-Light Pistol Instructor course in August)

Upon my arrival at Manchester airport, I was immediately embraced by all the fall colors that New Hampshire has to offer, and for someone who has not seen a change of seasons in seventeen years, this was certainly a welcome sight.

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(Some of the fall colors found on property at SIG SAUER Academy)

Our training day started promptly at 0830hrs in classroom #6 with ten students with various backgrounds in firearms training. Both of our Instructors, Dylan Kenneson and Chris “Cav” Cavallaro were excellent and spent a lot of time coaching us all throughout the day and as with all SIG SAUER Academy courses, the lead instructor explained and demonstrated all the drills before having students run them dry-fire and live-fire.

Once we got our “chow plan” figured out and completed all of the Academy paperwork, we got into introductions and then on to the range. Before we started any range exercises our Primary Instructor Dylan Kenneson outlined our Emergency Procedures, this was also reiterated after lunch.

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(Our Course Emergency Plan)

Once on the range, our first exercise was a modified version of David Blinder’s Dot Torture drill that was made famous by the late Todd Louis Green of Pistol-Training.

After being dot tortured (Pardon the pun) we got into some dry-fire exercises from seated positions on the range. We practiced all of the exercises dry-fire with a strict emphasis on safety and then moved on to live-fire once both Dylan and Chris were confident that we had the proper technique down.

Once we got in the first vehicle it was all about getting solid hits on the SSA-BM1 “Brett Target” named after Brett Martin, a former SIG SAUER Academy employee. Each student got the opportunity to be in the driver and passenger seat, engaging targets from two different distances. You couldn’t just point and shoot in this drill, you needed to take well-aimed precise shots especially from the passenger side of the truck as the target was about fifteen yards away.

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(SIG SAUER Academy Instructors Dylan Kenneson and Chris “Cav” Cavallaro watching closely over our live-fire exercises. Coolest license plate ever … “-SIG-” New Hampshire, “Live Free or Die”)

After a short break, a vehicle was delivered on a flatbed truck with major front-end damage, yet it had all its glass still intact to give us the chance to see how certain projectiles fared through windshields and of course side the window glass. In the course description, we were asked to bring some duty/carry ammunition and this proved educational as to what projectiles do when traveling through windshields.

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(On this target you may be able to see some of the markings as to what brand and the specific load that was used. We shot from the driver’s seat and the target was placed at a distance of five (5) yards away with the majority of shots taken with the muzzle positioned back from the glass. Our point of aim was to be the square box underneath the eight-inch center chest area circle. Look closely at the hole at the very top of the target, that shot was taken with the muzzle directly on the windshield using the Hornady Critical Duty 135gr +P load. The high deflection was due to the design of that particular projectile with its “Flex-Tip” design. The second shot with that load from back about six inches away from the windshield hit the target just to the right of the zipper, in the neck/collar-bone area)

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Important Note: When presented with a threat like this, your best option might be to mash the accelerator and run them over. If they have a weapon such as a handgun you would more than likely be justified in doing so as long as you can articulate and authenticate the presence of a threat of death or great bodily harm.

The course also included a block of instruction on escaping a vehicle in an emergency using many different tools to help with extraction. This block of instruction also included some innovative solutions to gaining access to a vehicle from outside as well. Personally, I carry a Benchmade Houdini Pro in the console of my vehicle and I also purchased a ResqMe in the SIG SAUER Academy Proshop to carry on my keyring as a backup. (See photo below)

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(In the photo above Victor from Sierra Element is engaging a threat through the rear window with Instructor Chris “Cav” Cavallaro coaching during the SIG SAUER Academy Bullets and Vehicles course October 23rd, 2017 in Epping, New Hampshire)

After lunch, it was on to some debussing drills and using cover to engage threats outside the vehicle. Our scenarios led by both Instructors and were all done with the utmost concern for the safety of the students and of course to ensure that learning was taking place while offering feedback on our techniques and more importantly keeping us focused on our performance.

(Just a couple guys out for a drive on a nice fall day in New Hampshire and then we start taking gunfire)

Teachable Moment: Getting out of the driver’s side seat and over the console of this Jeep Grand Cherokee proved difficult for a big dude like me. In this scenario, I was to engage our threats and provide cover for Victor to exit the vehicle. Once he was in position, he did the same for me as I exited the vehicle. This drill was very educational in the fact that if you’ve got to de-buss you need to do it quickly from any position inside the vehicle even if it is climbing out over the console. I also found that my Comp-Tac holster needs a little tightening down on the retention screws so it will hold my SIG SAUER P320 X-Carry a little more securely.

Lastly, several of us were given the opportunity to shoot through the Saturn in specific locations with several different calibers from .22LR to .45ACP in pistols and then a variety of long guns including a suppressed SIG SAUER MCX, M400 (AR-15), a Century Arms AK-47, a 7.62×51 sniper rifle, a 12 gauge Mossberg pump gun loaded with birdshot, buckshot, and rifled slugs. Then lastly, there was the behemoth below that Cav is point shooting without a scope, the .338 Lapua.

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In summary, the Bullets and Vehicles course does an excellent job in establishing some foundational skills for fighting in and around vehicles. Once again, SIG SAUER Academy does not disappoint and their Instructor Cadre, both Dylan Kenneson and Chris “Cav” Cavallaro proved themselves as two of the top trainers in this industry with their excellent instruction and positive coaching every step of the way. I also owe a big thank you as well to SIG SAUER Academy Training Coordinator Kathleen Randolph for getting me a seat in the course when it was already sold out. I wish that my schedule would have allowed me to stay for a few more courses before returning home to teach this past weekend.

Another benefit this trip gave me was the ability to reconnect with my friend Victor from Sierra Element. We took a little side trip to Kittery Trading Post in Kittery, Maine and had a couple good dinners together at places like The Holy Grail Restaurant and Pub. I can see Victor and I attending many more courses together in the future, he is a high-quality individual whom I will not hesitate to recommend as a trainer. If you live in Southern California, you can find a list of his courses by clicking here.

Lastly, this will probably come as no surprise; however, I am already looking forward to returning in 2018 in order to work some more on my skills and learn a lot more things that I can bring back to my students.

SIG SAUER Academy is a world-class training facility with world-class people that everyone should experience at least once in their lifetime. So, what are you waiting for?

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Join in the discussion with my over 5,800+ fans on Facebook at

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Course Review: Training with a Legend! Ken Hackathorn Advanced Pistol Course; October 7th & 8th, 2017 – Los Angeles, California (Host: Aztec Training Services)

Back in late April, I spent some time with industry giant Ken Hackathorn at the NRA Annual Meetings in Atlanta and during our conversation I asked him if I could get in a course he was teaching in Couer d’Alene, Idaho in June. Ken said, “no way, the course was way oversold by the hosts” and we both said, “See you at Burro Canyon.”

Fast forward to last weekend. In between visiting family that I don’t get to see very often and meeting with some television executives about providing technical advice to them on firearms and empty hand skills for their network actors and actresses, I attended Ken’s Advanced Pistol course at Burro Canyon Shooting Park high up in the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument.

On Saturday morning I woke up early because my body clock was still on Eastern Daylight Time, three hours ahead of the local time and because I might have been just a little excited to train with a man so well respected in the firearms training industry that everyone should do their best to get in one of his last courses before he retires full-time. So, shortly after sunrise, I found myself driving up to the range so I could be ready to learn from a man who has been on my list to train with for years.

Burro Canyon Shooting Park has nineteen bays ranging from forty-five yards to just under one-hundred ten yards in length.

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(The photo above is courtesy of the Burro Canyon Shooting Park website.)

At 0900hrs we started with Ken greeting all twenty of us and holding a short classroom session on the range before we got down to business running our handguns.

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(The photo above is of Ken giving a short classroom presentation at the back of the range on TD1.)

During the classroom presentation, Ken spoke with us about how he has been a “Student of Weaponcraft” all of his adult life. He said that current training is in decline right now due to oversaturation, and I agree. Unfortunately, a significant percentage of the firearms training community have no business instructing anything at all, they either have untested POI (Program of Instruction) or they cannot explain why they teach what they teach and how it applies to the responsibly armed citizen. Sadly, many of them cannot figure out the adult learning theorem either. These same folks are the ones that get into arguments to raise their social media status and are desperate to sell tickets to Gun School.

Ken started instructing after meeting United States Marine Corps Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper at a course he was teaching in Colorado a few years before the Colonel started the American Pistol Institute, you would recognize that institution now as Gunsite Academy. The story of how Ken got in that course was excellent and you will need to attend a course with Ken in order to get that story from the man himself.

By happenstance, United States Army LTC Robert K. Brown publisher of Soldier of Fortune magazine was also attending that same course in Colorado back in the early 1970’s and a short time after the course Colonel Brown offered Ken the opportunity to become a regular contributor to the magazine, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Just so you know, Ken is very serious about retirement. Yeah, many people have heard him say that he is retiring over the past several years; however, this year he conducted four courses and next year it will be only two and only one is open enrollment. So, fair warning to you, I suggest that if you want to train with Ken you had better find a way to get in that one open enrollment course. (There are hints all over this blog postings with links to the course registration) Ken told us that he has goals in life to see some things like Yosemite, and the Cody Museum and one can’t blame him, for Ken has been training members of the United States Special Operations community, sworn Law Enforcement Officers and of course responsibly armed citizens for over forty-three years, he’s due a break.

Once we were on the range Ken started us with a drill shooting five shots at the “A” zone of an IDPA target from the ready position of our choice. Ever the evaluator and coach, Ken doesn’t miss anything on the range and he is constantly coaching his students. He is well prepared and has a course of fire planned out in his head, I never once saw him refer to any notes, this kind of experience is what you pay for when you attend a course with an industry giant like Ken Hackathorn who was one of the founding members of both I.P.S.C. and I.D.P.A.

Over the two-day course I never once heard him “undress” a student for not doing things his way as you see with some of the “traveling road show instructors” these days. Ken showed us techniques that he has perfected over his career as a sworn Law Enforcement Officer and as an industry expert; however, while we were shooting his drills he left it up to us to us to figure out what techniques we were comfortable with.

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(The photo above is typical of the weekend, Ken on his way to give some personal coaching to one of the students on TD1.)

We were constantly evaluated by the timer and by our target. Ken’s scoring system is based on time measurements, and you must add time for misses outside the designated target area for the drill. There are two things don’t lie in the shooting world, the timer and your target.

Speaking of that, Ken told us a few stories about how some top level shooters and even some regular Joe’s would boast in his courses how they can run certain drills and score times that are absolutely over the top ridiculous. Ken said that he used to tell them, “Well, today I am from Missouri, and you’ve got to show me.” More often than not these folks would make excuses and or embarrass themselves by not being able to perform as they said they could just minutes before.

Many of the drills we shot over this two-day course are drills that you have heard of, e.g., the Bill Drill, the El Presidente’ and countless others. What made this educational was the fact that we shot just about all the drills individually on the timer in front of everyone else, talk about pressure to perform, that was some kind of pressure. We then evaluated our targets, pasting our bad memories and adding up our scores using Ken’s scoring method.

Ken’s 20-second pass/fail par time.

A = 11 seconds and under
B = 11.1 seconds to 14 seconds
C = 14.1 seconds to 17 seconds
D = 17.1 seconds to 19.9 seconds
20 seconds and above identifies the shooter as someone who needs a little more personal coaching.

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(The photo above is of Ken demonstrating his slide-lock or empty-gun reload technique on TD1.)

My scores over the weekend were consistently in the B/C range, as with everything when you apply yourself and focus on what’s important now at Gun School, you can do well. Once again, attending a course of this caliber helped me identify some things that I can work on to increase my skill level and also gave me a lot of things that I can pass on to the students that I train as well.

During the two-day course, Ken taught to the adult learning theorem of explaining, demonstrating, and then coaching students through his drills each and every time, and as I have said many times before, this style of teaching works really well for me as both a trainer and of course as a student.

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(The photo above is of Ken using his own personal Wilson Combat Lightweight Commander to demonstrate his “Strong Hand Only” shooting technique.)

My gun of choice for the course was my SIG SAUER P320 X-Carry, using a Comp-Tac OWB holster. I ordered one thousand rounds of Remington UMC 115gr FMJ ammunition from LAX Ammo and had it delivered directly to my hotel. The ammunition and the gun ran flawlessly; however, I did have a small hiccup with my X-Carry when some sand and dirt got in it from putting it on the ground to run the weak hand only shooting drills. The “Lightening Cut” in the top of the slide is certainly cool looking, but if you get any dirt inside the action, bank on it creating stoppages in the cycle of operation.

Additionally, I ran all the drills in the two-day course from concealment as did one or two other students who were from counties where the Sheriff will issue a California License to Carry.

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(The photo above is courtesy of Aztec Training Services.)

Speaking of Aztec Training Services, Chen and Andrew did a great job as hosts. You may know that when Alias Training & Security Services “closed it’s doors” Aztec was formed almost overnight and they either represent or host some of the biggest names in the firearms training industry, e.g., Ken Hackathorn, Larry Vickers, Jeff Gonzales, Buck Doyle, Daryl Holland and Matt Graham. Quite frankly, I wouldn’t have been in this course without being able to speak with Ken at the NRA Annual Meetings, but Aztec Training Services played a significant role by always being there to answer questions for an out of town traveler like me. Check out their website and course schedule in the various links I have placed in this posting.

In summary, this course is all about building your skills as a combative shooter. If you apply yourself and take good notes you will take away a lot of information that you can use in your personal range training sessions when you get back home. Again I encourage you to get in Ken’s open enrollment course next year if you want to train with him before he fully retires from teaching.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Join in the discussion with my over 5,800+ fans on Facebook at

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Photo Disclosure: Featured photo courtesy of Aztec Training Services.

Fourth Quarter 2017; Trigger Control Dot Org Training Schedule!

Hello Everyone! Because many of the courses that I teach are closed enrollment they are never announced anywhere. Regardless, many people have been asking for a listing of courses available for the responsibly armed citizen instructor and student and the ones I am attending as a student as well. This is a complete list of my upcoming training schedule for the months of October-November-December 2017. I foresee no changes to this schedule at the present time, plane tickets have been purchased, and both hotel and rental car reservations have been made as well.

October 4th (Wednesday) – Defensive Tactics Handgun Retention/Disarming Techniques (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): Orlando, Florida.

October 7th & 8th (Saturday/Sunday)Ken Hackathorn (Aztec Training Services) Two-Day Advanced Pistol Course: Burro Canyon Shooting Park; Azusa, California.

October 10th thru 13th (Tuesday thru Friday) – 9th Annual High Liability Instructor Training Seminar: Tallahassee Community College; Havana, Florida.

October 14th (Saturday) – NRA Instructor Basics of Personal Protection In the Home Course: Clearwater, Florida.

October 15th (Sunday) – NRA Refuse to be a Victim Instructor Development Workshop: Clearwater, Florida.

October 16th & 17th (Monday/Tuesday) – Simunitions Reality-Based Scenario Training for Law Enforcement (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): South Florida.

October 21st (Saturday) – Handgun Essentials & Defensive Tactics for the Responsibly Armed Citizen Course: Nicolet Rifle Club; Suamico, Wisconsin.

October 23rd & 24th (Monday/Tuesday)SIG SAUER Academy; Epping, New Hampshire.

October 27th, 28th & 29th (Friday thru Sunday) – NRA Personal Protection Outside the Home Student and Instructor Courses: Clearwater & Lakeland, Florida.

October 30th & 31st (Monday/Tuesday) – Vehicle Dynamics Course Days 3 & 4 (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): North Central Florida.

November 4th & 5th (Saturday/Sunday) – NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting – Instructor Led Training and NRA Instructor Pistol Shooting Course: Clearwater, Florida.

November 7th & 8th (Tuesday/Wednesday) – Two-Day Vehicle Dynamics Course (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): Tampa Bay Area, Florida.

November 11th & 12th (Saturday/Sunday)Rangemaster – Instructor Reunion Conference: BDC Gun Room; Shawnee, Oklahoma.

November 14th thru 20th (Tuesday thru Monday) – Closed Enrollment Course(s): Kentucky & Ohio.

December 1st & 2nd (Friday/Saturday) – USCCA Instructor Development Workshop: Clearwater, Florida.

December 4th thru 6th (Monday thru Wednesday) – NRA Practical Pistol Coach School: National Rifle Association Headquarters; Fairfax, Virginia.

December 9th & 10th (Saturday/Sunday) – NRA Rifle & Shotgun Instructor Course(s): Lakeland, Florida.

December 16th & 17th (Saturday/Sunday) – Pat McNamara TMACS, INC T.A.P.S. Sentinal Course: Panteao Productions Studios Facility; Swansea, South Carolina.

December 18th thru January 4th – Holiday vacation, no courses scheduled.

Please message me via www.facebook.com/triggercontrol for more information if you are interested in attending any of the open enrollment courses offered.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Join in the discussion with my over 5,700+ fans on Facebook at

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“On My Soapbox” – Open Carry while at Gun School.

Something new to Trigger Control Dot Org is an “On My Soapbox” blog. Hey, whenever I feel that I have something to say of importance about the firearms training industry in general and or some of the Gun Pretenders/Keyboard Operators who are in the industry I’ll press something, so stay tuned…

Open Carry while at Gun School:

As many of you know I go to Gun School a lot, and mostly as a student, not an instructor candidate. Candidly, I have all of the Instructor ratings that I need or want, but if one interests me in the future, I might take the course; however, it must fit with my long-term training goals and it cannot be an “In name only Instructor course.”

Edited to Add: One of the readers reminded me that many people have the attention span of a gnat and that they can only read and comprehend 140 characters at a time before losing interest. (Sorry Twitterville, it was his comment, not mine.) Regardless, he suggested that I drop some sort of hint that this is not about the competitive shooting sports and I said that I would make a slight emendation to the post. Here goes:

“This blog posting is not directed toward the Competitive Shooting Sports.”

If given a choice, I will always run a course as a student with my handgun in a concealment holster. Sometimes that is not an option based upon the policies of the instructor, the range or the academy that I am attending, so we make adjustments for those policies and get in the training.

One of my mentors, Tom Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services has all of his students and instructor candidates work exclusively from concealment unless they are a sworn law enforcement officer or possibly a licensed armed security guard and normally carry their handgun in a security holster. I follow this same methodology and have for a long time because it is the responsible way to train the armed citizen.

Let’s face it, a significant majority of Americans carry their handguns concealed. How do I know this you ask? Just travel to one or a couple of the forty-five (45) states that allow some form of open carry, sit down with your latte and do some “people watching” at the food court in the local shopping mall, or go to a Walmart for a cultural experience (There’s always a lot of good people watching at Walmart) and look around at the waistbands of all the people that you see. I’m betting that you won’t see many handguns being openly carried. In fact, in the last several years I have traveled the country extensively (Eighteen different States) attending and also teaching courses, and I can count on one hand how many handguns I have seen attached to the waistband of people in those states.

FYI: I was just in three open carry states weekend before last and saw absolutely NOBODY open carrying except the people in Gun School while on the range.

So, what is the point for a responsibly armed citizen to pay all the money to attend Gun School and then run their handgun from open carry when they never carry that way? Again, let’s be real, and if your argument is I live in an open carry state, I have pretty much rendered that argument invalid. There are very few folks who practice open carry walking among us, most people carry concealed and that is just a stone-cold fact proven by my research that I continue to do each time I travel to an open carry state.

Seriously, if you go to Gun School and don’t run your handgun from concealment you are only cheating yourself out of all the repetitions that you would get from concealment. These are repetitions in the fundamentals that go a long way in building a level of automaticity into your motor cortex. (Psst, that means inside your brain because there is no such thing as muscle memory. I still shake my head each time I hear a Gun Pretender say these words or a Keyboard Operator write the words, muscle memory.)

OK, now to Mr. or Ms. Big-Time Firearms Instructor/Keyboard Operator I hit a nerve underneath your paper-thin skin didn’t I? Yeah, I meant to do just that, you can believe it. You say that running from concealment is not “Tacticool” enough for you and it doesn’t make for a good photo to add to your Facebook or Instagram account, right? You must be the type of Instructor/Keyboard Operator who trains students for photo opportunities and you offer little to no real hands-on training. Sadly I have seen it too many times at Gun School with the Instructor taking photos and uploading to his Facebook page not paying attention to his students. Oh, by the way, you Instructors/Keyboard Operators who don’t carry a gun all the time, John Farnam one of the top trainers in the whole shootin’ match from Defense Training International refers to you as “Gun Pretenders” and so do I, it kinda fits, now doesn’t it? (I just love that description, Gun Pretenders.)

It is your responsibility Mr. or Ms. Big-Time Firearms Instructor/Keyboard Operator to make your students do the hard stuff while in training so it will be easier for them to become adaptive to the situation when the fight is on, and believe me they will need to adapt very quickly or their loved ones might just be planning a funeral.

I cannot be any more clear than this, open carry on the range at Gun School is just a bunch of “Tacticool” asshattery and those who perpetuate it are typically the ones that have a bunch of paid followers on Facebook, Instagram, and various other social media outlets or better yet, an Internet Radio Show. The crap that some of these people teach has unfortunately been codified in the training community for years by those who probably shouldn’t be instructors in the first place. Yeah, I just said that and I can feel your anger, I am very easy to find if you want to talk about the butt-hurt that statement has caused you.

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Oh boy, I bet this wins me some friends among the Keyboard Operators in the community, not! This just in, I don’t care.

By the way, I will continue to call B.S. on the asshattery I see on social media and at Gun School each and every time I see it, and that you can bank on.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Join in the discussion with my over 5,700+ fans on Facebook at

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Follow my blog here on WordPress at

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