“The Gospel of the Gauge” – Patterning your Shotgun for Professional/Duty and or Home or Self-Defense use.

One of my mentors, Tom Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services refers to Shotgun Training as “The Gospel of the Gauge” especially when it is done on a Sunday. (Don’t lie, you laughed) Tom also says that “Patterning your shotgun is critical, but an often overlooked aspect of being prepared to use that gun in self-defense.”

I have patterned a few shotguns before and understand that many people do not because they are living in some type of an alternate reality believing that a shotgun doesn’t need to be aimed and that somehow their payload will magically find their intended target. The hard reality is you must practice sound fundamentals and have both a steady aim and good trigger control in order to hit your target, even with a shotgun.

Before I get started, I’d like to ask all of the Gun Pretenders, YouTube, and Instagram Instructors and of course those famous Keyboard Operators out there, please stop recommending birdshot for professional/duty and or home or self-defense. Birdshot offers less than adequate penetration and besides, birdshot is for shooting what … the correct answer would be, you guessed it, birds.

OK, let’s talk about how to pattern your shotgun.

In order to establish a control group, I recommend placing three (3) shots on a target with a variety of payloads, each from the exact same distance, 15yds or 45ft. The POA or Point of Aim I chose with my Beretta 1301 Tactical was the center of the “A” Zone on an I.P.S.C. (International Practical Shooting Confederation) target. (Yes, I patterned the gun with some birdshot and I used a distance of 10yds or 30ft for those payloads)

Sure you could use five shots and most often in zeroing my rifle I will use a five shot group because I want to make sure that I minimize the outliers or as Pat McNamara calls them, “Junebugs.” However, I feel that three shot groups are sufficient to get an accurate feel of the payload and what it will do when launched from your shoulder-fired shotgun.

The reason I specifically mention shoulder-fired shotgun is that there are a couple new kids on the block, the Remington TAC-14, and the Mossberg 590A1 Shockwave. These shotguns have been available for over a year now and maybe close to two; however, they are basically hand cannons and are difficult to shoot with much accuracy using full-power payloads even for the most experienced of shooters. One man, “Brobee223” on YouTube has perfected the art and was very successful using his Mossberg 590A1 Shockwave to bag a couple deer late last year. I have linked his video below, give it a look. Fair warning, it is rather lengthy.

Back on track with patterning my Beretta 1301 Tactical. The first load I chose to shoot was by far the best and it really comes as no surprise. The Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 00BK, 8-Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad (LE13300) is the choice of many an experienced shotgunner. As you can see in the photo below, all twenty-four (24) pellets from my three shot group landed within a 3″ group with the three (3) larger holes being the wads.

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Below are photos of my other targets, using different loads, showing their patterns.

Federal 2 3/4″ 000BK, 8 Pellet, Maximum. (F127000)

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Olin Corporation 2 3/4″ 00BK, 9 Pellet Military Grade. (Brown Box)

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Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 1BK, 15 Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad. (LE132 1B) This was the second best pattern; however, I find that the 1BK is not as consistent as the 8 Pellet 00BK patterned in the first photo.

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Federal 2 3/4″ 4BK, 27 Pellet, Maximum. (F127 4B) Just to big of a spread for me at this range and not something I would recommend for professional/duty or home or self-defense use.

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As I mentioned above, I wanted to put some birdshot on target and here are the results. Birdshot Federal #4 Shot “Heavy Field Load” – 2 3/4″ – 1 1/8oz – 10yds (Take note, the larger holes were made by the wad, not the shot) This sure appears to be a tight pattern, it’s the lack of penetration that makes birdshot suboptimal in its effectiveness for professional/duty or home or self-defense use.

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Winchester Super Target #8 Shot 2 3/4″ 1oz – 10yds (Once again, the larger holes were made by the wad, not the shot) Same result, fairly tight pattern; however, penetration with this payload would also be an issue.

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So, once you have established a control group and your desired starting distance (Mine was 15yds) and you have selected the payload that you feel works best in your shotgun, it’s time to find out what the maximum effective range of your shotgun is with that particular load. In order to determine that, you will want to run your shotgun out to a distance and stop when you find the point at which you can keep all of your pellets from your chosen payload inside an 8″ to no more than 12″ pattern. I’d also recommend not only shooting cardboard or paper targets alone, make sure to shoot some steel as well. I happen to use 12″ AR500 discs that are 3/8″ thick, they work well with 00BK at this range.

From this test, it’s easy to see that my 1301T likes the Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 00BK 8-Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad (LE13300) best at 15 yards. From previous experience with this payload, I can move back as far as 30yds and still keep the pattern inside an 8″ to 12″ group and that is precisely the reason I choose this particular load for my shotgun.

When I can find some time in between the courses that I am teaching and the ones I am attending as a student this spring and summer I will pattern my Vang Comp Systems Remington 870P to find out exactly what it likes best. Candidly, I suspect that there will be some similarities; however, one never knows until we put in the work.

If you need assistance in patterning your shotgun for professional/duty or home or self-defense use please consult a reputable Instructor/Coach who is familiar with the nuances of patterning a shotgun and can give you proper advice on the appropriate payload for your intended use as well.

Winding up I would be remiss if I didn’t give you an opportunity to train with Mr. Givens as he preaches “The Gospel of the Gauge” later this year in Lakeland, Florida. If you are an Instructor or aspire to be one I’d highly recommend that you train with Tom and Lynn Givens. For more information on the Rangemaster Shotgun Instructor Development course, please see below.

Rangemaster Defensive Shotgun Instructor Development Course
Chief Instructor: Tom Givens
November 16-18, 2018
Firearms Training Club of America, Inc
Lakeland, Florida (Private Range)
Tuition: $595.00

Register Here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/defensive-shotgun-instructor-course-3-day-tickets-39454107297

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Prepare yourself for the legal aftermath! Comparing legal plans for situations involving the use of deadly force or the threatened use of force.

While teaching courses all across the country I am often asked by my students about the different plans available for protection in the aftermath of a self-defense incident where the use of force including the use of deadly force has taken place.

Protecting yourself against the aftermath is a huge business these days and it all started in 2008 with Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network, they are the oldest and most respected organization in this market.

This information below was gathered from the websites of these providers and from my personal knowledge as a member of two of the companies, and it is verified current as of 10/16/2017.

Self Defense Plan Comparisons

There are many intangibles that need to be factored into your decision, and your decision should NOT be based on cost or blind allegiance to one organization.

The Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network has an Advisory Board consisting of industry giants Massad Ayoob of Massad Ayoob Group, John Farnam of Defense Training International, Tom Givens of Rangemaster Firearms Training Services, Attorney’s Emanuel Kapelsohn and Jim Fleming and Dennis Tueller best known for the “Tueller Principle” and the article he wrote in SWAT Magazine in 1983 named, “How close is too close?” You cannot buy that kind of expert witness team who will be on the ground helping your defense team immediately after your call, none of the other providers have these folks available on a moments notice.

CCW Safe bail bond coverage to $100,000.00 is huge, since most bonds can be well in excess of that amount, and their no limit to coverage for Attorney’s fees for both Criminal and Civil Defense is only matched by US/Texas Law Shield.

As you see from my spreadsheet above, most of the plans have liability limits and remember that certain things like paying for discovery documents may or may not be covered, in the State of Florida vs. Zimmerman case, discovery costs were in excess of $300,000.00, do you have that in savings or investments that you can access?

Again, buyer beware and know exactly what you are buying with these agreements. NRA Carry Guard is a reimbursement program, that means you come up with all the money upfront, they are the only reimbursement program in the industry.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you are a sworn Law Enforcement Officer and want coverage on and off duty, you need to look at CCW Safe or US/Texas Law Shield, they are the only providers who have plans that cover sworn Law Enforcement Officers.

In fact, it should be noted that USCCA has told sworn Law Enforcement Officers that their department will cover them when they are sued as a result of an on-duty incident, this is a patently false statement.

The moral of the story is simple. Do some in-depth research on each plan, then and only then can you make an informed decision to protect yourself in the aftermath of a significant emotional event like having to use deadly force to save your life or the life of your loved ones.

So, if you are not a multi-millionaire and can fund your own defense, you might want to compare some of the legal protection plans, be it an insurance backed plan, a legal services plan or a membership backed plan.

Find out more by clicking on the links below.

Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network

CCW Safe

Conifer Insurance CCW Advantage

NRA Carry Guard

Second Call Defense

USCCA

US/Texas Law Shield

In full disclosure, I will not recommend one program over another, as I do not know your financial position. I have said it several times, you need to do your own due diligence. I am a member of the Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network and I am also a member of CCW Safe, after doing my own research years ago I found these two programs offer exactly what I want and more importantly, what I need.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Don’t be “That Guy.”

All day yesterday from 9:00am to a little after 5:00pm I participated in a Tactical Combat Casualty Course. I was asked to participate by the chief instructor to evaluate and offer some actionable feedback on the program of instruction.

It has been said many times, that it’s better to be, “the guy on the side” rather than, “the sage on the stage.” When attending a course as a student (Especially when you have some knowledge of the program of instruction) you must remember that you are the learner and not the master. I ended up keeping my head on a swivel due to “That Guy.”

Yesterday, “That Guy” was a neophyte who just jumped into the gun culture recently and showed up late to class, brought no note taking material and was literally more concerned with taking photos and videos for his Facebook page rather than receiving training and getting immersed in the program of instruction.

“That Guy” also had the audacity to invite his girlfriend to the course in order to take photos and videos of him running two of the reality based training scenarios set up for us in the afternoon. She (That Guy’s Girlfriend) wan’t dressed in the appropriate range attire and was again, a hindrance to training, and she could have created a liability for the instructors and other students. This is exactly why I never allow spectators in any of my courses. This is NOT a criticism of the instructor(s) in this course, I am willing to bet that neither of them knew that he invited her, and that’s normal behavior from a neophyte to do these kinds of things, so as an instructor, you must always be prepared.

Oh by the way, here is a measure of “That Guy’s” competence with a firearm. In the opening range exercise he took ten (10) shots at his target from five (5) yards away and missed 50% of his shots low and left. For a right handed shooter that shows a lack of trigger control,; however, he immediately blamed this on his sights being off and he left the firing line to go retrieve another handgun to use. He did no better with the second handgun. Oh, and not only did “That Guy” NOT ask permission to leave the firing line, he held up the entire course, the instructors and all of the students who were toeing the line and ready to go.

Now, as a professional firearms instructor, I know that it is normal for a neophyte to make excuses and blame their equipment for their deficiencies in basic defensive shooting fundamentals; however, it is the professional who takes notes of their errors and works diligently and deliberately to improve their skills. There is an old saying, “It’s never usually the arrow, always the Indian,” and from five (5) yards away from your target a sight deviation drill will prove that if you press the trigger correctly you will get a hit darn close to your point of aim. I do it in every class to demonstrate how sight alignment works.

My good friend, Major (R) Navarro says, “You are not what you say you are, you are what you do or don’t do.” He’s got that right, this guy is a neophyte.

Here is another important observation concerning “That Guy’s” muzzle direction. It was downright scary and I was shooting two lanes to his left, not a good position with his gun handling skills. Just so you know, he was corrected multiple times by the chief instructor, and each time he made a joke of it.

During the “Hot Wash” or review after each scenario, “That Guy” was very vocal on what he liked and didn’t like, adding in his spin on things. Unfortunately for him, each time he opened his mouth he proved that he was chalk full of unconscious incompetence. Just a more professional way of saying, “you don’t know, what you don’t know. Click on this link to for an brief explanation of the Stages of Learning.

To my fellow students and instructors, “That Guy” can not only be a hindrance to the delivery of the program of instruction, he can be a safety hazard. This means that you must be prepared when you encounter “him” and know exactly how to effectively deal with “That Guy.”.

One last comment, “That Guy” was first in his vehicle and race out of the range to leave, he didn’t stay and help the instructor(s) break down three bays that were set-up or take the time to help with the classroom cleanup. It was obvious what “That Guy” came for, the free training and to run his mouth, not his gun.

 

Until next time …

Live life abundantly!

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

Course Review: GLOCK Operator Course May 9th-10th, 2017 – Smyrna, Georgia

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(Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

On May 9th and 10th I attended the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course held at GLOCK Training – Glock Sport Shooting Foundation Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia.

Eligibility requirements for all open enrollment GLOCK Operator courses are as follows: Active or Reserve Law Enforcement, Active or Reserve Military, Licensed Armed Security Officers, current GSSF Members and current NRA Certified Firearms Instructors. These eligibility requirements can be found here, with additional course information, to include the course outline and expected round count can be found in this PDF.

As I mentioned above, this was GLOCK’s initial open enrollment offering, the first course was a closed course for Law Enforcement Officers only. The students were from many different walks of life. There were four members of the media invited to attend the course by GLOCK’s Media Department including some really big names in gun writing and one other writer who showed up and paid the full course tuition of $300.00. There were five regular Joe’s, all of whom paid the same $300.00 tuition as well. The regular Joe’s were as follows: Two (2) sworn Law Enforcement Officer’s, one (1) United States Army Reserve Captain and GSSF member from North Georgia, a Country Club Manager and GSSF member from North Carolina and of course, yours truly. Additionally there were also three (3) full-time GLOCK employees in attendance as well.

The GLOCK Pistols in attendance consisted mostly of 9mm models, 17’s, 19’s & 34’s, and one GLOCK 40, 10mm long-slide. Personally, I have never seen a student bring a 10mm to a course like this; however, the brave young man who did should be commended, he did very well considering he had a gun with tremendous impulse during the recoil cycle.

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(GLOCK 40, 10mm – Photo Courtesy of Andre’ M. Dall’au)

Our Instructor for the two-day course was Joseph “Willie” Parent, III; Director of Training and GSSF for GLOCK, Inc., Willie is a seventeen (17) year veteran of the United States Marine Corps, and he let you know it with his rigid military bearing, serious demeanor and of course the vernacular he used on the range.

Willie used the term “event driven” many times in a short period of time to describe the course along with explaining that this course was a collaboration of several GLOCK Staff Instructors. He went on to say that they developed this course to help people who own GLOCK platform pistols operate them more efficiently and of course, effectively.

It is worthy to note that it was mentioned more than once that “GLOCK Training doesn’t sell excitement.” From taking this course I can assure you that is a true statement. Nothing about the presentation of this curriculum was exciting. (More on this later)

The round count for this course was advertised at 1,000 and GLOCK company policy is that each student bring only factory ammunition, no hand-loads are allowed in any GLOCK Training course. As someone who has attended a lot of high-volume round count courses, I have learned to give a twenty to twenty-five percent (20%-25%) buffer +/- on the advertised round count, and that estimate has been pretty darned accurate for years. I find that more often than not I have shot less than advertised number. My exact round count for this course was 375 rounds. TD1 round count was 135, TD2 was 240 including the 22 round GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards Test.

Now, I have never been in a course where the round count is 62.5% less than advertised; however, I have seen these things happen to others, and the reason is typically a lack of course content, unfortunately that was not the case here. There was plenty of course content that we didn’t even get to experience, e.g., low-light/no-light techniques and alternate shooting positions. Sadly, our course was shorted, that is the bottom line and you will understand how as you read further.

(Important Note: As a mentor I don’t see it my place to publicly shame someone on social media or on my blog that is read by literally tens of thousands of people, but our job is to never forget the first rule in teaching something; deliver all of the advertised curriculum to your paid students, no matter if your course is “event driven” or not, and do so in a way that minimizes you and your accomplishments and maximizes the curriculum and of course participant involvement. This will allow you to hit the adult learning theorem of hear, see and do in each block of instruction. The student who paid the full tuition will be grateful if you just remember that one simple thing.)

TD1 started in the classroom with a safety briefing that was a combination of Colonel Jeff Cooper’s four universal rules of gun safety and the NRA’s three rules of gun safety. (I really wish Instructors would pick one or the other and not both, and never make them your own by changing the words, it doesn’t add anything to them, in fact it takes away from them) At this time we also received an overview of the GLOCK pistols and their functionality.

The National Sales Manager and Assistant National Sales Manager brought the GLOCK summer releases down from “The Mothership” for us to see. These included the GLOCK 17L Gen 3 and GLOCK 24 Gen 3, both with their 6.02″ barrels, the GLOCK FDE frames and of course the GLOCK 17C & 19C Gen 4 guns. You may not be able to see them in the photos below; however, GLOCK is now offering guns with forward cocking serrations near the muzzle on their guns, that is something new this summer.

Once the classroom presentation was complete, we headed to the indoor range just a few steps away and through a set of double doors. Once inside we made sure our guns were clear and started with dry-fire presentations from the holster (Open Carry) at fifteen (15) yards while in an “interview position.” This position is similar to the position that a Law Enforcement Officer might use when speaking to someone just outside of arms length. Our Instructor taught what I call the “press out” presentation or the upside-down “L” and not the index presentation.

Once we were done with dry-fire presentations, we were then taught how to properly load a GLOCK pistol. This exercise was done by Instructor demonstration only, there was no student involvement in this exercise which surprised me because that goes against the adult learning theorem of hear, see and do. Besides, we were all instructed by the course outline to bring ten (10) dummy rounds each, this would have been a great opportunity to use them.

We then started on the course of fire standing on the fifteen (15) yard line shooting ten rounds slow-fire. The Instructors command of “Shooter Ready, Target” was our queue to present our pistol and fire. The target used was an NRA B-8 target. (See Below) We repeated this exercise three times alternating relays and pasting all misses that hit outside of the nine ring.

I had recently installed a new set of Ameriglo I-Dot sights (GL-301) on my GLOCK 19C Gen 3, and I needed to get used to the proper sight picture at fifteen (15) yards. In my first go around I had only three of ten hits inside the nine ring; however, after I made a slight adjustment in sight picture my group was spot on. (Pardon the pun) After we completed this drill, we took a lunch break for an hour.

AAA NRA B-8 Target
(The NRA B-8 Target)

If you attend this course at GLOCK Training/GSSF Headquarters in Smyrna, there are several small local restaurants close by; however, I suggest that you bring a cooler if you are driving and eat your lunch there in the classroom, that way you are not rushed going somewhere to eat and then making it back on time afterwards.

We reconvened in the range after lunch we started shooting pairs at fifteen (15) yards, again starting in the interview position and upon command. I found this very weird as there was really no reason to be “banging pairs” from fifteen yards away, this does nothing for marksmanship fundamentals or allows an diagnostics to take place; however, after shooting three iterations of pairs we then started working on slide-lock, empty-gun or emergency reloads depending on the terminology that you use.

Willie showed us four of the six ways Instructors teach their students to send the slide into battery after a reload and emphasized that the power-stroke was the way we should be doing it with the GLOCK platform pistol. (The power-stroke has the shooter cupping the support hand over the rear of slide and pulling it back using the thumb and fingers on the cocking serrations on the rear of the slide so the recoil spring assembly or RSA for short is fully compressed before you release it. Provided you have a good RSA, this action creates maximum inertia in launching the slide forward into battery)

Next we performed the one shot, slide-lock reload, and one shot drill working on perfect technique. This is a very good drill and one I use on a regular basis to improve my reload speeds.

Next we started shooting silhouette targets while preforming what Willie called, “immediate and remedial action” drills. These terms are nothing more than military jargon for clearing common stoppages and malfunctions, e.g., failure to fire, failure to eject, failure to extract etc…

Next we worked on failure to stop, or the Mozambique drill from the seven (7) yard line and we ran though this three times per relay. The Mozambique drill is two shots to the chest and one to the head performed from the holster or a ready position, we performed it from the holster. Once we finished this drill, TD1 was in the books.

It is also worthy to note that all drills were performed from either a low-ready or from open carry on TD1, there was no option to work from concealment, even for an experienced student.

TD2 started with a good breakfast at the Holiday Inn Express Atlanta Galleria area and upon checkout I was given a one-day credit on my bill because our room was not serviced for us while we were training the day prior. That was nice of the hotel management to offer and do that for me, after all I am an IHG member.

TD2 of the GLOCK Operator Course started in the classroom with a review of the safety rules from TD1 and then we headed into the range and started with a drill that is designed to help the student with trigger control. Candidly, this drill should have been the first drill after dry-fire presentations on TD1; however, it wasn’t me that wrote the course of fire and I was there to learn, it just seemed awful strange doing a drill that is used to teach the shooter about trigger control when we had already shot 135 rounds on TD1.

We then proceeded to shoot this drill from three, five and seven yards on an NRA B-8 target. During the first iteration we were instructed to pin the trigger to the rear and then let it reset after our sights were back on target. Firearms training industry titan John Farnam calls this, “catching the link.” In the second iteration we would go through resetting the trigger under the impulse of recoil, and in the third iteration we were to speed reset the trigger while firing pairs. I found this drill to be of little value as I do not nor would I ever teach pining the trigger to the rear and catching the link as you ride the reset forward.

Catching the link can have disastrous results if not done properly and with a loss of fine motor skills that will occur under stress this might just cause you to freeze when resetting the trigger, I have seen it too many times with Law Enforcement Officers being taught the fundamentals of trigger control improperly and because they pin the trigger to the rear they lose time on their qualifications, not to mention what might happen if they are in a gunfight with a hardened criminal who does not see handcuffs in his or her future.

We then performed this same drill at ten (10), twelve and a half (12.5) and fifteen (15) yards, only this time we were shooting a silhouette target center chest. Again, there is no value in doing this at distance, there are much better drills to help the student understand proper trigger control and cadence. With the experienced shooters we had in this course this drill could have been easily done in one or two iterations from three or five yards, yet we wasted time doing this out to fifteen (15) yards. Again, this drill is a TD1 drill in any course I have ever been to, but not the GLOCK Operator Course.

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The flames you see are the burning gases exiting the ports in the barrel of my GLOCK 19C Gen 3 as I shoot a drill at the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course in Smyrna, Georgia on May 9th & 10th, 2017. (Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

After a short break we came back to find the NRA B-8 targets back up again and the next drill was the ball and dummy drill. Again, this is a drill that should have been done on TD1, not TD2.

In this drill we gave a fellow student a couple magazines and shot this drill at the twenty-five (25) yard line. This is way too far away from the target for this drill. Each iteration was from the holster, presenting the pistol and firing one shot. If we were on a dummy round and we caused the sights to deviate, we were supposed to tell our coach (Fellow Student) what we did wrong. The Instructor told us that saying “I anticipated” was not acceptable, he’s right about that, not everything is an anticipation or flinch. As shooters, we were to describe exactly what we did to cause the sights deviate off of our intended point of aim.

We then went on to shooting multiple targets with pairs to the high center chest area of a silhouette target from the holster. This drill was done from the seven (7) yard line and we were to change the target that we started with during each iteration. In this drill you must make sure to not “out-drive your headlights” as my mentor Tom Givens says. In case you are wondering, your headlights are your eyes, and to get good hits on the target or threat you are transitioning to you must move your head first and then bring the gun to your eyes and engage the second target or threat. See the example in the photos below.

Engaging multiple targets from the holster. (Photos Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

The next drill we worked on was a box drill. This is where you shoot two rounds to the torso and one round to the head on multiple targets. This drill is basically a failure to stop or Mozambique drill using two targets and taking the two head shots after you engage the second target or threat with a pair to the chest and then transition back to the first target and taking a head shot on that target as well.

After a break we started shooting on the move. First with moving forward from the fifteen (15) yard line all the way to the one (1) yard line while engaging a silhouette target high center chest. When the Instructor demonstrated this drill he was visibly upset with himself when he missed a single shot and even said so in front of the class. As a student I found this to be unprofessional and as an Instructor I was embarrassed for him. Unfortunately this was not an isolated incident, Willie had made this mistake on multiple occasions; however, this time it was pronounced and instead of him using his misses as a teachable moment to explain to the students why he missed the shot, he was down on himself and said out loud that he was worried about the writers making light of this miss in their articles and blogs.

Candidly at this point I had heard about enough and had to chime in, “Let’s focus on the positive here, you shot sixteen or seventeen rounds and missed one, I’d say that is a good hit to miss ratio.” After I said that, several students approached me on lunch break and thanked me for having the courage to say that, because this was beginning to be a common theme and unfortunately that is basically what we were subjected to for two days.

Once each student had run through moving forward on a threat three times we took a lunch break for an hour.

After lunch we worked on moving to the rear from three to seven yards again shooting a silhouette target high center chest. I didn’t mention it before, but the key to any movement drill, no matter the direction you are moving is to press the trigger when you have an acceptable sight picture or sight movie as Gabe White refers to it.

After a short break we were then introduced to shooting on the move left and right at the seven yard line. This technique was new to many of the shooters and some struggled with the footwork associated. Similar to moving rearward we ran through this dry-fire once and live-fire once.

Next we worked on strong hand and support hand only shooting from the ten yard line and then we went dry for nearly two hours working on one handed manipulation drills using our strong hand and weak hand only. Two students showed their techniques to draw the gun from their holsters using the support hand only. These are techniques that I had seen before; however, I tried several different ones until I settled in on the one I have been using for years.

We then worked on more one handed manipulations including clearing malfunctions and reloading the pistol with strong hand and support hand only. The safety protocol was very high with these drills, and thus we only preformed the drills dry-fire with dummy rounds.

After a short break we were introduced to the GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards. This is an evaluation, not a qualification of your skills under the pressure of a shot timer. Due to all the wasted time in the course each student only got one try at the pistol standards test, even though the scoring sheet had room for three separate tests as they refer to them at GLOCK Training. Considering all of the penalties I had my score was a very disappointing Level 1; however, when I returned home, I was able to run the same exact course of fire three times in a row cold, scoring a very respectable Level 3, each time.

Please do not ask me to share the GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards with you, it’s not going to happen. One has to protect the integrity of the course so new students don’t try to practice the evaluation standards in preparation of the course.

This will not be a surprise to the instructor as I left many of these comments on my written course review before leaving the building; however, as both a student and fellow instructor I am not sure Willie is the right instructor to deliver this curriculum and I cannot recommend this course to anyone at this time.

As a mentor, I would jump at the opportunity to work with Willie in polishing his presentations and this course of fire so it makes sense, and flows better so the students can see all of it.

Sadly, I could have saved nearly $750.00 in tuition, hotel charges, gas, food the 625 rounds I never fired, not to mention sixteen hours worth of windshield time, had I known this was going to be the result.

As a good friend told me, “Gordon, someone had to be the guinea pig.” If GLOCK Training offered me a seat in the course again I would take it, and maybe I might get a chance to see the entire course of fire and run all the drills; however, after publishing this course review, and even offering to mentor Willie, I don’t see that ever happening, then again surprises do happen.

Oh, nearly a month has passed since the course and I did receive this nice GLOCK Operator PVC Patch in the mail, I will put it with all the other patches I collect and remember what might have been.

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Just remember, as a student you must be willing to pick up the brass on the range, and my good friend Paul caught me doing what I do best with a walnut picker.

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(Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

#GLOCK #GLOCKTraining #GSSF #GlockOperatorCourse

Until next time …

Live life abundantly!

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

Beware of “The Gun Counter Instructor”

Yesterday evening I was in my local gun shop (LGS) just looking around, and a few feet away from where I was standing a young man in his 30’s was asking a salesperson for some advice on what ammunition he should use in his home defense shotgun. As you might imagine, I was trying hard to hide the fact that he had my full-undivided attention.

Enter “The Gun Counter Instructor” with is classic answer. “All you need is some #7.5 bird shot.” Then he gestured past where I was standing and said, “It’s right over there past the guy in the tan shirt.”

As the young man walked my way, I stopped him and said, “I couldn’t help but overhear that you are looking for some ammunition for a home defense shotgun.” He answered in the affirmative and I told him, “Bird shot is for killing birds, not home defense against a home invasion robbery.” I then asked him what kind of shotgun he has and he politely said, “Remington 870 Marine Magnum.” (One of my favorite shotguns)

I then handed him a box of Federal FliteControl® Wad 2 3/4″ 9 pellet 00 buckshot (Not the exact load I prefer, but it will work) and told him this was what he is looking for to load in his home defense shotgun and to try it out at 10 and 15 yards to see what the pattern looks like at those two distances. If it is smaller than 12″ to 14″ then he should be good to go as he probably won’t have to make a shot of more than 15 yards inside his home. He then confirmed that the largest room in his house is only 35 feet wide, so not quite 12 yards. We continued our conversation on the way to the checkout line and I handed him a business card inviting him to my next Defensive Shotgun Course and noticed he was buying five (5) boxes of 00BK. I left him by recommending he try to find the 8 pellet 00BK through one of the major online ammunition retailers and handed him an extra box that I had in my car.

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The moral to the story is, as an Instructor or a responsibly armed citizen don’t overtly make the “Gun Counter Instructor” look bad, and try to be consultative in nature when giving advice in a gun shop. If you are an Instructor, make sure to have some business cards with you as well.

It is my sincere wish that this using bird shot for home defense theory would go away, but it won’t until we educate all of the “Gun Counter Instructors” to stop giving out poor advice to unsuspecting customers, I’d settle for my local gun shop employees as a start.

Until next time, stay safe & train hard!

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