Course Review: Assault Counter Tactics; Vehicle Counter Ambush Course, April 15, 2017; Titusville, Florida

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

This past Saturday I attended Paul Pawela’s Assault Counter Tactics, Vehicle Counter Ambush Course in Titusville, Florida at the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum. The course was set up to provide training and to honor United States Army Colonel (R) Danny McKnight, Battalion Commander 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment during the Battle of Mogadishu. The event was sponsored by Nate Love with Frontier Tactical in Brooksville, Florida and Spartan Training Gear.

I arrived at about forty-five minutes early using less than a half tank of gas on the 2.5 hour drive from the Tampa Bay area. When Paul and Linda arrived, I introduced myself and jumped right in to help them unload their equipment.

Before the course started I had the opportunity to walk around the Museum (I had been there once before, but it was after hours) and check out all of the displays including the gun range and their extensive display of patches and badges from law enforcement agencies all across the country. I was impressed by the display of artifacts dedicated to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and the murder of Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit. The American Police Hall of Fame & Museum is a beautiful facility and one you must see if traveling anywhere near Florida’s Space Coast.

IMG_6511
(Photo Credit: Trigger Control Dot Org)

A little after 0900hrs the course started with Paul giving us a safety briefing on the four universal safety rules and to let us know that we must all disarm and make sure that we do not have any firearms and other weapons on our person during our participation at the five stations he had set up for us. After the safety briefing and making sure everyone had filled out a waiver Paul introduced Colonel (R) Danny McKnight.

Colonel McKnight spoke a little about what his role would be in the training and he graciously offered to personalize a copy of his book, Streets of Mogadishu: Leadership at it’s best, political correctness at it’s worst!” Make sure you pick up a copy on his website at: http://dannymcknight.com/bookdvd.htm

The other presenters who spoke before training commenced were Manuel (Manny) Cabrera of Sidekicks Family Martial Arts Center, and E.J. Owens founder of Legally Concealed and author of “Counter Violence; your guide to surviving a deadly encounter.”

The training day consisted of the twenty-two participants being broken down into five small groups to participate in reality-based scenario training on the grounds of the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum.

My first station was a scenario where a responsibly armed citizen drove up on a machete wielding man bludgeoning someone to death. The citizen had to dismount his vehicle (4-Door Jeep) and access an AR platform rifle in the back of the vehicle, load it and engage the machete wielding killer. Students were graded on proper use of cover/concealment and while under stress if they could manipulate a rifle in order to stop the threat from killing more innocent civilians. Overall this was a great station and if you are not carrying a firearm in your person, you may have to access a long gun that is somewhere else in your vehicle to stop a spree killer. The use of Ultimate Training Munitions (UTM) made this station a true force on force scenario. By the way I played an unprepared victim having my hands in my pockets. 🙂

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Machete
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was with E.J. Owens, E.J. led our group through another scenario where we were loaded in the cab of a four-door Ford Super Duty and participants in certain seats were given Glock 17T‘s loaded with Simunition cartridges. E.J. explained that when in a vehicle you must be aware of the angles that you can shoot at considering the A-pillar and B-pillar may be in the way. We also talked about shooting through automotive glass and through door panels and how that may effect the trajectory of the projectile you are firing. We also talked about where you might want to be carrying your firearm so you can access it in case something like this happens to you. Remember, a handgun is commonly referred to as a side-arm because it should be at your side or more appropriately on your person and not in a glove compartment, center console box or for heaven’s sake not under the seat.

In the two scenarios in which I participated in, I was sitting in the driver’s seat. In scenario number one two armed men approached the vehicle on my side demanding the vehicle and money. I extinguished both of them with one shot each to their chest protectors and the scenario ended. In scenario number two I did not have a firearm, the person in the passenger seat did. While stopped an unarmed man came up to my window demanding money, but not posing a threat and as I was pushing the guy away from the vehicle the passenger made an attempt to shoot him. This was clearly a no-shoot situation; however, the decision the passenger made had deadly consequences for me, because he actually shot me with the Simunition cartridge. (In reality he shot my shirt; however, I felt no impact from the cartridge even though there was Simunition paint marking on my shirt) The lesson learned here is quite simple, don’t shoot your friend who is driving the vehicle. This was an excellent scenario, very realistic with the use of the Glock 17T’s and the Simunition cartridges.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 EJ station
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was set up with the participant walking in a parking lot to their vehicle and an actor approaches them asking for money. There were armed and unarmed confrontations, students were graded on if they could use “verbal judo” and keep the actor away from them and recognize the threat in time to draw their concealed firearm and deal with the situation. As with every encounter, you must watch the hands, they don’t lie and when someone you perceive to be a threat makes a furtive movement around their waist after you have given them commands “Get back, stay back” then you better be ready to use or threaten to use deadly force. (In Florida there are provisions in the statutes for the threatened use of deadly force) Again, overall a good scenario, the only thing I would have done a little different is added in some blank firing guns to make this a lot more realistic.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Bob
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was geared toward armed confrontations and handgun disarming techniques with Manny Cabrera. At this station we were introduced to Krav Maga handgun disarming techniques. Since I was there to learn I had an open mind and tried the Krav Maga technique; however, being that I was trained in the Lindell system of weapon retention and disarming I knew it would be very difficult for me to change those techniques since I have habituated them into a highly refined skill. The other part of this station had us in the driver’s seat of a sedan with the windows down. We were approached by an armed assailant and had to disarm him through the window and then given another technique to pin the gun against the dashboard near the A-pillar and then drive off. We also had a scenario where the armed assailant entered the vehicle in through a rear door and we had to disarm him in the car. Overall this was a good set of scenarios, as with the others they are problem solving and decision making then acting on our decisions.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Manny
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

Lastly we worked on team tactics and some situational awareness skills with Andy Tolbert of Strong Defenses. These scenarios focused on how we must pay attention when riding in a car to the things happening around us at a traffic light. (The guy who comes up to wash your windshield at the intersection. The aggressive panhandler, etc…) The scenarios we ran here were great, as usual, Andy did an awesome job. (I might be a little biased since I trained with her a couple times and certified her in two NRA disciplines as well)

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Andy
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

To summarize, this course was well thought out by Chief Instructor Paul Pawela and well executed by his team of Instructors. The scenarios were realistic to the things we see on a daily basis while watching the evening news.

Quoting the one and only Massad Ayoob, “Whether the fight is verbal or physical, the first law of human conflict is to be able to predict where the attack will come, and already have a counter in place for it.”

This course was well worth the $200.00 tuition and the proceeds benefited a real American hero, Colonel Danny McKnight. If you missed it, don’t feel bad, there will be others and I will host Paul in the Tampa Bay area for this course in the future. You can also find out Paul’s schedule by following his business Facebook page at: Assault Counter Tactics or find him on the world wide web at: http://www.assaultcountertactics.com/

 

Until next time …

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

NRA Basic Pistol Course Update

1l68vbOn March 9th, 2017 the NRA Education & Training department announced to its Training Counselors that it would be adding a new Instructor Led Training (ILT) course to their course catalog under the Basics of Pistol Shooting Course. This new curriculum will be available for all NRA Certified Pistol Instructors to offer to their students beginning on April 4th.

The NRA Education & Training department staff, including senior level directors and board members had been meeting with a team of Training Counselors over the past several months working on this new curriculum along with the policies and procedures to administer this new course.

The NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting, Instructor Led Training (ILT) course will be launched on April 4th. It marks a return to the traditional instructor/student relationship for this course and will give the Instructor the ability to offer a condensed version of the course, training on only one action type instead of both. (Semi-Automatic or Revolver). As with all NRA basic courses, both the “Blended” and the “ILT” version will include a course completion checklist. This checklist is an invaluable tool that will allow the instructor to document what they have taught their students, as well as a record of the student’s acknowledgement that they feel comfortable in understanding and performing each objective. The instructor will provide each student with a student package from the NRA Program Materials Center materials.nrahq.org that will consist of, the NRA Guide: Basics of Pistol Shooting Handbook and a course exam. The student packages will also be available starting on April 4th.

Once the course is complete, the instructor will submit an electronic course report through their instructor portal account and include the student’s written exam score, the shooting skill they achieved the action type they were trained on, and acknowledge that each student met all of the learning objectives as set forth by the National Rifle Association. After submitting the course report, the instructor will be able to print a course completion certificate for each student directly from their portal account and all of the information entered in the course report will automatically print on the certificate of completion.

The recommended targets to be used in the Basics of Pistol Shooting course have been improved as well. Instead of being four inch circles in solid red, white and blue, the targets will have a colored ring (Red, White and Blue) around four inch white circles allowing the student to focus on the front sight during the qualification instead of the target color.

Also worthy of note is that the Instructor will have the option to conduct the entire bench-rest course of fire with a SIRT pistol or a similar laser training device in the classroom ONLY if the range facility they are using does not allow bench-rest shooting.

The NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting course lesson plans for both the “Blended” and the “ILT” course will be updated with clarifications on exact minimum round counts, refinements of definitions, and of course policies and procedures. The new lesson plans will be available in the instructor portal on April 4th.

Speaking of the instructor portal, the NRA Education & Training department has been working on streamlining the site to make it easier for Instructors and Training Counselors to administer training and obtain updates from NRA headquarters. The new www.nrainstructors.org will also be launched on April 4th as well.

The NRA is also planning a media campaign associated with this release. So far, 30,000 people have completed Phase I online since it was launched in 2016 and with the increased media awareness, registrations for both courses will be sure to increase. The media campaign will include promotions in NRA media publications, newsletters, electronic and print magazines and also on television as well.

With this addition to the NRA’s course catalog, the Certified Pistol Instructor will be able to offer these four different courses to their students:

NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting “Blended” (Phase II)

NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Instructor Led Training (ILT)

NRA Pistol Marksmanship Simulator Training

NRA Gun Safety Seminar

It is important to note that the Basics of Pistol Shooting Phase I & II, better known as “Blended Learning” will remain as an option for those students who prefer the self-study eLearning modules as their introduction to firearms safety along with basic gun handling and shooting skills. Those who choose the self-study course must complete the entire course and score a 90% on their exam before they are able to meet with an NRA Certified Instructor and complete the hand-on practical exercises in Phase II.

Also starting on April 4th, NRA Certified Pistol Instructors and Training Counselors will be able to purchase a “Course Control Code” that they will be able to issue to their Students and Instructor candidates for Phase I at a significant discount from the current price on https://basicpistol.nra.org/ This will allow for a one-stop shopping experience for Students and Instructor candidates. Additionally all Instructor candidates will still be required to pass the Basics of Pistol Shooting Phase I as a prerequisite for attending the NRA Instructor Pistol Shooting course with an NRA Training Counselor.

Instructors and Training Counselors should make sure that their email address is up to date in their instructor portal account at www.nrainstructors.org as the NRA will be sending out a Trainer’s Update on March 22nd, that will detail all the changes with both course(s). They will also be placing alerts in the instructor portal for all 125,000+ Certified Instructors and Training Counselors.

Please help spread the correct information on these new additions to your fellow instructors, and let’s all work together in offering the highest quality firearms training to both our Students and Instructor candidates.

Finally, if you are an Instructor or Student and have questions about the new program please feel free to contact me by asking questions here in the comments section or by joining my 5,600+ Facebook fans at: www.facebook.com/triggercontrol

Stay safe!

“No Firearms/Weapons Allowed” signs and the comotion they create and emotions they stir on Social Media…

Carrabba's

Signs like these, we’ve all seen them.

Recently a Facebook page named “Son’s of Liberty Tees” shared this photo on their Facebook page. As of now they have 134 Likes and 147 Shares.

Personal story of a recent visit to a Carrabba’s in Jacksonville, Florida last Friday evening with my cousin and two friends who are husband and wife. We saw no sign(s) like this outside because there isn’t one and I engaged the proprietor in conversation about firearms and firearms training. The proprietor asked me some information about his Glock 19 that he used for his concealed carry course here in Florida and hearing that he was a Florida Concealed Weapons or Firearms Licensee I offered him to attend my Defensive Pistol Course in Ponte Vedra on Sunday June 14th. We had a very engaging conversation about guns, so much that I was worried about him not taking care of his other patrons. We exchanged contact information and had a great conversation about the “John Cole” that was removed from their menu because of the problem with Blue Bell Ice Cream.

The moral to the story is simple … This sign was placed by a proprietor who is obviously ignorant to the fact that criminals don’t read signs and lawful concealed carry license/permit holders are some of the most law abiding citizens in the country. Just so you know, not all Carrabba’s proprietors post signs like these.

By the way, these signs do not carry the weight of law in Florida and many other states, the very worst they can do is ask you to leave ONLY IF they see your fiream(s). Then you MUST leave or it becomes armed trespass a which is a whole different ballgame.

In summary, when people jump on the “band wagon” blasting companies that post these signs when most of the time is it NOT the company, just a local proprietor. So, who gives a crap, if the sign is posted or not, if you are legally allowed to own and possess a firearm and legally allowed to carry it concealed, ignore the sign and carry everywhere you are legally allowed to by the laws of your state.

Please consider following my blog here and also joining in on the conversation on my Facebook page at: www.facebook.com/triggercontrol

Find out about my upcoming courses at: www.facebook.com/triggercontrol/events

Stay Safe, Train Hard and always #CarryYourDamnGun

– Gordon

Do you have specific goals when at the range? Think S.M.A.R.T.

Yesterday evening Tom Givens posted this to the graduates of his Rangemaster Instructor courses and I thought it was way too good not to share. For those of you who follow the Trigger Control Dot Org Facebook page, you know that we share a lot of content to help make you a better defensive shooter along with many other things focused on the responsible armed citizen.

When I am at the range, I am there with a plan in mind to work on a specific skill set that is important to me. Sure sometimes I am there to “shake out” a gun that I might be using for training or a new concealed carry gun that I bought, but let’s face it, these days with the cost and availability of ammunition, range memberships, gas to get there etc… we all need a plan with some goals to work toward in improving our defensive shooting skill sets.

I give the “floor” to Mr. Givens.

What are S.M.A.R.T. Goals?

A critical step in increasing your defensive shooting skill is to be able to set up S.M.A.R.T. training goals. Think of it as driving your vehicle from your home to some other destination. You could drive around aimlessly and hope you eventually arrive at the address you seek. A better solution would be to get directions, plot them on a map, and follow those directions directly to your destination. That is our goal in S.M.A.R.T. training.

I’ve been teaching people professionally for over 35 years, for 18 years I owned a range where people often came to practice, and I teach almost every weekend somewhere in the US. On my range, I frequently saw people come and practice with no plan, no goal, and little or no organization. When they left they were not one bit better than when they arrived, and they could have accomplished every bit as much with dry practice at home. In our classes, no matter what part of the country we are in I see the same errors by shooters who have had a fair bit of prior training. The problem is, after the training their practice is unorganized, haphazard, and without real goals. Since they practiced so inefficiently they come to class shooting no better than when they came to the last class. We basically start over with these folks every time we get them in class. For your practice regimen to be of any real value you have to set goals and attain them. You can’t just say your goal is to be a better shot or to be “really good”. That is so vague as to be meaningless. We need a standard to achieve and road map to get there.

For a goal to be effective and useful to you, it should be S.M.A.R.T…. S (specific), M (measurable), A (attainable), R (realistic), and T (timely). Broadly general goals, generally speaking, will not be achieved. So, let’s look at each of these criteria and see how they apply to the defensive shooter.

Specific– each range trip or dry practice session should be planned around working on and improving one or two specific skills. The skill should be identified in advance so that you can have the correct supplies, targets, and any other equipment you need to work on those specific skill sets. Trying to work on everything at once leads to improving nothing significantly. It is far better to concentrate your attention on one or two skills in each session. In advance of your range trip or dry practice session identify the skill set you want to work on and then identify the drills that would help polish those particular skills. For instance, if you want to work on accuracy, a bulls-eye course of fire may be in order, or perhaps one of the small dot drills.

Measurable– a time and accuracy standard gives you a metric for seeing if you are actually getting better or not. Never just blow rounds down range. Every drill fired and practice string should be critiqued and or scored and targets taped or replaced so that you can see exactly where hits are going. Never rely on your subjective idea of how fast you’re working, you will just about always be wrong. You can have a training partner with a stopwatch, or if you practice alone you can use an electronic timer to verify your progress. Many smartphones now have timer apps available, so there’s really no excuse for not using a timing device in your range trips. To accurately measure your progress you can use standardized drills, exercises, and courses of fire. By scoring your targets and noting your time it’s pretty easy to track progress or the lack of it. There are a lot of standardized drills that emphasize discrete skills with well-known time/ accuracy requirements. The FAST drill devised by Todd Green is just one example. You either get your hits into the 3 x 5 card and the 8-inch circle or you don’t, and you either make the time specified or you don’t. It’s a great idea to use a small notebook as a log and note the date and time of practice, the individual drills worked on, and your scores/times. Tracking your progress in this manner gives you an accurate idea of how you are progressing.

Attainable– be realistic when setting your goals to avoid frustration and burnout. If you’re just starting out as a defensive shooter, a 1.2-second draw from concealment to a hit at 7 yards is probably beyond your reach. Find your current baseline shooting scored drills, record your score or time and set a reasonable goal for improvement. For instance, if a slide lock reloads currently takes you four seconds, make your goal cutting your time to three seconds. Once you achieve that goal, make your next goal cutting the time to 2 1/2 seconds. Each time you have a major improvement, it is going to be harder to make it to the next level, so work in increments that you can manage. Trying to go from that four second reload to a two second reload in one jump is a lot to ask. If you shot the current FBI pistol qualification course at 75% today, make your next goal shooting 85%, rather than 100%. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

Realistic– when setting goals, take into account your physical attributes, your training resources (time, ammunition, and money), your equipment limitations, and the context for which you are training. For instance, it is counterproductive to set goals built around what Grand Master USPSA shooters do with match gear worn openly if you are wearing a compact pistol concealed under clothing in an IWB holster. If you are older or have physical limitations take those into account realistically in your training plan.

Timely– set a real-time goal for your desired improvement. This helps you stay on track and put in the work. If you want to improve one specific skill such as the slide lock reload mentioned above, you might set a goal of shaving the time from four seconds to three seconds in three months of combined range work and dry practice. If your goal is to reach a certain score on a broad course of fire that covers a lot of different skills, you might set a time limit of say, six months. As mentioned before, use a logbook to record your efforts and your achievements as you work toward your goal.

Using the S.M.A.R.T. approach you can make the most of your training resources and I assure you, you will progress faster and get a lot more out of your limited training time.

Tom

 

Stay Safe and Train not just Hard, train S.M.A.R.T.!!!