“On My Soapbox” – Open Carry while at Gun School.

Something new to Trigger Control Dot Org is an “On My Soapbox” blog. Hey, whenever I feel that I have something to say of importance about the firearms training industry in general and or some of the Gun Pretenders/Keyboard Operators who are in the industry I’ll press something, so stay tuned…

Open Carry while at Gun School:

As many of you know I go to Gun School a lot, and mostly as a student, not an instructor candidate. Candidly, I have all of the Instructor ratings that I need or want, but if one interests me in the future, I might take the course; however, it must fit with my long-term training goals and it cannot be an “In name only Instructor course.”

Edited to Add: One of the readers reminded me that many people have the attention span of a gnat and that they can only read and comprehend 140 characters at a time before losing interest. (Sorry Twitterville, it was his comment, not mine.) Regardless, he suggested that I drop some sort of hint that this is not about the competitive shooting sports and I said that I would make a slight emendation to the post. Here goes:

“This blog posting is not directed toward the Competitive Shooting Sports.”

If given a choice, I will always run a course as a student with my handgun in a concealment holster. Sometimes that is not an option based upon the policies of the instructor, the range or the academy that I am attending, so we make adjustments for those policies and get in the training.

One of my mentors, Tom Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services has all of his students and instructor candidates work exclusively from concealment unless they are a sworn law enforcement officer or possibly a licensed armed security guard and normally carry their handgun in a security holster. I follow this same methodology and have for a long time because it is the responsible way to train the armed citizen.

Let’s face it, a significant majority of Americans carry their handguns concealed. How do I know this you ask? Just travel to one or a couple of the forty-five (45) states that allow some form of open carry, sit down with your latte and do some “people watching” at the food court in the local shopping mall, or go to a Walmart for a cultural experience (There’s always a lot of good people watching at Walmart) and look around at the waistbands of all the people that you see. I’m betting that you won’t see many handguns being openly carried. In fact, in the last several years I have traveled the country extensively (Eighteen different States) attending and also teaching courses, and I can count on one hand how many handguns I have seen attached to the waistband of people in those states.

FYI: I was just in three open carry states weekend before last and saw absolutely NOBODY open carrying except the people in Gun School while on the range.

So, what is the point for a responsibly armed citizen to pay all the money to attend Gun School and then run their handgun from open carry when they never carry that way? Again, let’s be real, and if your argument is I live in an open carry state, I have pretty much rendered that argument invalid. There are very few folks who practice open carry walking among us, most people carry concealed and that is just a stone-cold fact proven by my research that I continue to do each time I travel to an open carry state.

Seriously, if you go to Gun School and don’t run your handgun from concealment you are only cheating yourself out of all the repetitions that you would get from concealment. These are repetitions in the fundamentals that go a long way in building a level of automaticity into your motor cortex. (Psst, that means inside your brain because there is no such thing as muscle memory. I still shake my head each time I hear a Gun Pretender say these words or a Keyboard Operator write the words, muscle memory.)

OK, now to Mr. or Ms. Big-Time Firearms Instructor/Keyboard Operator I hit a nerve underneath your paper-thin skin didn’t I? Yeah, I meant to do just that, you can believe it. You say that running from concealment is not “Tacticool” enough for you and it doesn’t make for a good photo to add to your Facebook or Instagram account, right? You must be the type of Instructor/Keyboard Operator who trains students for photo opportunities and you offer little to no real hands-on training. Sadly I have seen it too many times at Gun School with the Instructor taking photos and uploading to his Facebook page not paying attention to his students. Oh, by the way, you Instructors/Keyboard Operators who don’t carry a gun all the time, John Farnam one of the top trainers in the whole shootin’ match from Defense Training International refers to you as “Gun Pretenders” and so do I, it kinda fits, now doesn’t it? (I just love that description, Gun Pretenders.)

It is your responsibility Mr. or Ms. Big-Time Firearms Instructor/Keyboard Operator to make your students do the hard stuff while in training so it will be easier for them to become adaptive to the situation when the fight is on, and believe me they will need to adapt very quickly or their loved ones might just be planning a funeral.

I cannot be any more clear than this, open carry on the range at Gun School is just a bunch of “Tacticool” asshattery and those who perpetuate it are typically the ones that have a bunch of paid followers on Facebook, Instagram, and various other social media outlets or better yet, an Internet Radio Show. The crap that some of these people teach has unfortunately been codified in the training community for years by those who probably shouldn’t be instructors in the first place. Yeah, I just said that and I can feel your anger, I am very easy to find if you want to talk about the butt-hurt that statement has caused you.

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Oh boy, I bet this wins me some friends among the Keyboard Operators in the community, not! This just in, I don’t care.

By the way, I will continue to call B.S. on the asshattery I see on social media and at Gun School each and every time I see it, and that you can bank on.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: SIG SAUER Academy P320 Armorer, M400 Armorer & Low Light Pistol Instructor Course(s), conducted August 14, 15, 17 & 18, 2017

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On Sunday August 13th I flew up to New Hampshire to attend three courses at SIG SAUER Academy in Epping.

All three of my flights on Southwest Airlines, the two going and the non-stop coming home from New Hampshire went off without a hitch. I got upgraded to a Subaru Outback and logistically everything went very well. Once again I stayed at the Hampton Inn & Suites in Exeter. The hotel is very nice, I took advantage of the pool and the Jacuzzi this time and the complimentary buffet style breakfast buffet each morning is very good. The staff, to include the General Manager were all very professional and attentive to a few special requests that I made before and upon arrival. I will stay here each and every time that I visit SIG SAUER Academy.

Dinner at The Holy Grail twice and Telly’s once along with a pizza from New England Pizza kept me full. If you are in the greater Epping/Exeter Metropolitan area, you must experience The Holy Grail. It is a restaurant and pub inside an old church not far from the Academy. Telly’s specializes in pizza and other American fare, and New England Pizza in Exeter has a white pizza that is pretty darn good, especially when you put bacon and some other toppings on it. The Hanaford Supermarket was my other “go to” while I was there, along with the Hammersmith Sandwich Company for lunch while in class.

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Upon my arrival at the SIG SAUER Academy and Pro Shop late Sunday morning I noticed that the P320 X-Carry was on sale and I “attempted” to buy one with my student discount, one of the sales guys told me they had three of them in stock and I was all excited; however, after he came back from the storage room I was crushed because they were out of stock. At least I was able to put a deposit on one and will have it shipped to Florida when they are available. Still no P320 X-VTAC as of yet, Lipsey’s is shipping them out to their dealers, but not the Pro Shop. Had one of those been in stock I would have bought it instead, so I am 0-2 in gun purchases while attending courses at the Academy. On the bright side, I was able to buy a lot of accessories with no state sales tax and at the student discount price, score!

Important Note: I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention how professional and courteous the Academy Staff and Pro Shop employees are, those folks are always eager to help.

Let’s get to the course reviews …

TD1 for me started Monday morning I started in Classroom #1 in the Indoor Pistol Range Facility with Chris “Cav” Cavallaro for the P320 Armorer Course. “Cav” is the Subject Matter Expert on campus for the Armorer courses, and that means that he is in charge of the Program of Instruction for the Armorer courses. The P320 is a very simple weapon system to work on for both the operator and the certified armorer. Candidly, while attending the course there was no running from the elephant in the room, we talked about the voluntary upgrade announced by Sig Sauer on August 8th, 2017 and our Instructor was open and honest about all the things that the company is doing to remedy the situation. The voluntary upgrade will include a small amount of CNC work on the frame (That is the metal part inside the grip module) and they will be adding a disconnector and also swapping the current trigger to one that is lighter in overall weight and with a balance point that is near the pivot pin. My questions were answered about this issue and I used a P320 in the Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course on Thursday & Friday with no issues whatsoever. Parts for certified armorers are readily available by calling in to customer service and ordering them direct over the phone. I like that versus sending in an order form and waiting for months to get parts shipped to you. (Not mentioning any manufacturers in particular)

Overall, Monday’s course was excellent, and oh by the way, it was attended by several factory people and a couple Academy Instructors that interjected their insider knowledge of the gun and what is going on inside the factory to get ready for the influx of guns coming in for the voluntary upgrade. We were told to not leave with questions unasked and all of us got in our share. By the way, successfully passing the course (There is a test) gives the graduate a three year certification.

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TD2 on Tuesday was all about the M400. You would know this as the AR15 platform rifle. My first exposure to this type of rifle came 35 years ago this month when I joined “The Green Machine.” Many of the things taught came right back like I was in my Unit Armorers course while I was in the Army. We didn’t break the gun all the way down back in the day, but I knew how to and “Cav” showed us some techniques that really helped when disassembling and more importantly reassembling the rifle.

I enjoyed all the repetitions we got in working on the rifle, similar to the P320 course we were not left wanting more and all of our questions were answered. Same as the P320 armorers course, successfully passing this course (There is also a test) gives the graduate a three year certification. One important note, this course is hopefully switching to a two-day format with a one-day re-certification in the not too distant future.

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Photo: My instructor for both Monday and Tuesday’s courses, Chris “Cav” Cavallaro summoning the power of Thor!

Additionally on Monday and Tuesday I had the pleasure of meeting and training with Ofer and Amir from Be’er-Sherva, Israel. These two guys are living the motto, “Live Free Or Die” each and every day of their lives. Think about that, and let it sink in. They are at a constant state of war with all the terrorism in their tiny country, amazing when you spend some time in thought about it.

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On Wednesday morning I got to spend some time with Steve Gilcreast, my Instructor from the Master Pistol Instructor Course I attended in June. Steve put me on the shot timer through his 100 round warm-up exercise, and I must admit that I didn’t do as well as I expect out of myself, and I had to hit the gong in Area 51, but I had a great time. Steve is a thinker and a doer who can translate his points across to students very well, anytime spent with him one-on-one is time well spent because of his knowledge, skills and his attitude. Steve is one of the top firearms instructors that I have ever trained with, period.

Back to the gong issue, in case you don’t know, if you don’t have a round chambered and you press the trigger on your gun and your gun goes click when it was supposed to go bang, (Dead Man’s Gun) you and your partner must run to one of the gongs on campus and you must smash the gong ten (10) times with authority using a hammer and then run back to your training area. (Your training partner goes along with you for moral support) It could also be that your magazine was not seated correctly, or a few other reasons. Yes, I had my moment with the gong while the students in the Master Rifle Instructor Course observed. Oh, and the hammer was missing so I had to make due with a BFR. I posted this photo for accountability in the photo album that I created on my business Facebook page at Trigger Control Dot Org, and I also posted one on my Instagram page @TriggerContolDotOrg – this one below is for accountability here.

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On Wednesday afternoon I got to see the factory from the inside, it was nice of one of the engineers to invite me in for a peek. Nothing to see here, no cameras allowed in the factory.

Lastly on Wednesday afternoon/evening I was able to go to Stratham Hill Park and find the very rock where Robert Todd Lincoln stood and read the Declaration of Independence to the citizens of New Hampshire on July 4th, 1860, just before his father Abraham Lincoln became the 16th President of the United States. Pretty cool stuff to stand on that rock, no kidding , it gave me goose bumps.

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After I stopped at the Lincoln Rock, I climbed the rest of the way up the Lincoln Trail (It’s pretty darn steep) to the top of the hill and found the Forest Fire Service Tower. I had to climb to the top all seventy-seven steps and seven flights to get a look at the surrounding area, and it was quite a sight. I highly recommend you go to Stratham Hill Park when visiting SIG SAUER Academy to experience these things, I can assure you that it is an experience I won’t soon forget. You can find out more information on Stratham Hill Park by clicking on this link to their Facebook page. Stratham Hill Park on Facebook

TD3 for me started in Classroom #9 in the Indoor Pistol Range Facility on campus with New Hampshire native Todd Moriarity and Nick Brazeau from Montreal, Canada in the Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course. We had six students/instructor candidates and that made for a really great course.

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Photo: For this course I ran my Surefire P2ZX Fury Combat Light (500 lumens) with a Surefire V85A holster system. I also brought my Surefire E2D LED Defender Ultra (500/5 lumens) as well. Both worked well and a few of my new best friends wanted to try my bezel down holster. Once I left the course I purchased a Surefire Y300 Ultra High Dual Output LED Flashlight as Todd had one and it looked promising for a back-up flashlight.

By the way, 500 lumens is plenty enough for anyone. These new flashlights with 1,000 lumens, yeah, they get way too hot running courses of fire like this and also they end up giving you a lot of back-splash if you are to close to cover and have poor technique, What happens is you will end up momentarily blinding yourself with the light bouncing back in your eyes. (So yes, there is such a thing as too many lumens)

After a short classroom session on Thursday morning going over some of the different flashlight options out there and of course the safety rules, we all hit the Indoor Pistol Range with our frangible ammunition and got to work. Like all SIG SAUER Academy Instructors, Todd is a master at teaching to the adult learning theorems. Before teaching each technique Todd would explain, and demonstrate the technique and then we would imitate it dry-fire and then practice it live-fire. This goes to the core of the SIG SAUER Academy training methodology of E.D.I.P. or Explain, Demonstrate, Imitate, Practice. (I’ll add in Test for E.D.I.P.T. and call it good)

By the way, I really can’t share the course of fire with you, it’s not something that they give out; however, I take really good notes and have it down on paper, but that is the exception, not a one of my fellow Instructors were taking notes on the range during the exercises, I just don’t have that good of memory to not take notes.

On Thursday, Todd taught us a new technique that was developed by Academy Instructor Jim Meyers. It is referred to as the “Jimmy Meyers Technique.” This technique is similar to the Rogers-Surefire; however, it is different in the fact that you turn the wrist of your support hand 90° so the back of your hand is up, and then you place the thumb of your support hand in contact with the grip of the handgun under the thumb of your master hand. It is an interesting technique, one that I certainly need to practice some more in order to become a whole lot better at.

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Photo: Todd and Nick going to put out a little fire inside the range on Thursday afternoon caused by the powder from the frangible ammunition we were using while shooting steel. It was only a little smoke, nothing major.

The Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course also requires the student/instructor candidate to preform a teach-back to the other students and cadre. On Thursday just before we broke for the day, we were assigned ours and my partner and I were assigned to T.E.A.M. teach the Modified FBI and the Neck Index technique.

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Photo: The Indoor Pistol Range at SIG SAUER Academy in low-light, that is not my camera flash, the lens is picking up light from in back of the range, once the shades were dropped it was pitch black inside that range, a perfect training environment for this course.

TD4 for me started on Friday morning again in the classroom with a review of the the previous days POI, and then were in the Indoor Rifle Range. My partner and I were selected to go first with our presentations. We prepared well and hit E.D.I.P. by explaining the technique and the history behind it, then we talked each other through the demonstration phase of the technique and then we had the other students/instructors candidates imitate and practice the technique. (Personal Note: I love doing teach-backs)

After each presentation we were given actionable feedback on what we did good, what we needed to work on and what we did really well. During the review, we were told that we did a great job by our peers and the cad re. They made a couple comments about how we worked as a T.E.A.M. and that is exactly what T.E.A.M. teaching is all about. (Positive-Improvement-Positive or the “sandwich method” of evaluation is alive and well at SIG SAUER Academy)

Additionally Todd and Nick set up a drill for us to practice all the things that we learned on Thursday in a low-light/no-light environment. We had to start by moving to cover and then find and engage our threat with two to five live rounds. (The SSA-1 Brett Target gets shot a lot at SIG SAUER Academy) During this drill, we were had to move to a new piece of cover and perform a tactical reload when necessary, and then try a different technique, we got to do this twice going one direction and then moving backwards through the course in the other direction. I found this to be very beneficial because it allowed me to try just about all of the techniques from some unorthodox positions, e.g., kneeling, supine and laying on my side, and of course standing.

This brought us to lunch time. Once we had our bellies full of Hammersmith Sandwich Company sandwiches we got suited up for some training in a shoot-house. There are several single family homes on campus that the Academy uses for this purpose, they also have a series of Conex style containers set up for this type of training as well. The house we were in was nicknamed “Red Feathers.” Seriously, it should have been named “Bat Feathers” because there was a bat in the house that we had to eradicate during this evolution.

Each one of us got to clear the house as an individual and then as part of a T.E.A.M., Todd said this was not to grade us on our tactics, but to make sure we were using sound flashlight discipline, both he and Nick gave us excellent feedback on our flashlight use and gave us tips to make us better with our tactics, I found this to be an excellent evolution.

Funny Story: When I was picked to be the “bad guy” students John and Victor, both sworn law enforcement officers entered the house searching for me and Victor called out, “Gordon, are you in here? We got a warrant for you, come on out boy.” I had to do everything I could to keep from laughing. My new best friend Victor said he did it hoping that I would give my position away, that failed, but these two sworn LEO’s cleared this house like a boss using sound flashlight discipline and T.E.A.M. tactics.

One thing I enjoyed about Todd and Nick’s teaching style was this, after each evolution on the range or in the shoot-house we did a short review. Todd asked us what we liked and disliked, making us think about the techniques that we used and how we liked them in that particular situation. We got plenty of repetitions and both Todd and Nick gave us personal coaching to make sure we were preforming the techniques properly and with sounds tactics, with a student-to-instructor ratio of 3:1, that is easy to do.

At the end of the course may of us suggested adding a third day and incorporating the long gun into the POI. That could be in the plans, Todd is responsible for the POI for this course and he said that he has thought about that as a possibility.

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Photo: Sig Sauer Frangible Ammunition. The Course of fire was true to the number at about 500, rounds, we used this is the indoor pistol range; however, on the second day of the course we were able to use FMJ ammunition. SIG SAUER Academy has plenty of ammunition, if you show up they will give you student pricing on the ammunition. We all arrived with a good working knowledge of the techniques, what we did here is refined the techniques and preformed a teach-back as all Instructor level courses should require. Now, it is up to us as Instructors to transfer this knowledge to others. As with the other courses, upon successful completion of this course course, graduates are given a three year certification.

Overall, the Low-Light Pistol Instructor Course conducted at SIG SAUER Academy was excellent, I really enjoyed it and learned a lot of subtle nuances that make the techniques work well in a live fire situation. It tests your gear and your TTP’s under stress and that’s what you must do in training. I would highly recommend this course to an agency instructor or anyone who teaches these techniques to the responsibly armed citizen.

To find out more about taking an Armorer Certification course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Armorer Certification Courses

To find out more about taking an Instructor Development course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Instructor Development Courses

To find out more about taking a Shooting Development course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Shooting Development Courses

To find out more about taking a Competitive Shooting Development course at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Competitive Shooting Development Courses

To find out more about taking a course in a certain specialty at SIG Sauer Academy click on: Specialty Training Courses

To find out more about taking a course from a Guest Instructor, e.g., Mike Pannone or one of the many nationally and internationally known Instructors they bring in to the Academy each year, click on: Guest Instructor Courses

Important Note: Your tuition includes free loan of firearms (In most courses, not all), holsters, safety glasses and hearing protection at the Epping, NH location.

Now, if you guessed that I am planning another trip back to SIG SAUER Academy, you would be correct, stay tuned!

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Don’t be “That Guy.”

All day yesterday from 9:00am to a little after 5:00pm I participated in a Tactical Combat Casualty Course. I was asked to participate by the chief instructor to evaluate and offer some actionable feedback on the program of instruction.

It has been said many times, that it’s better to be, “the guy on the side” rather than, “the sage on the stage.” When attending a course as a student (Especially when you have some knowledge of the program of instruction) you must remember that you are the learner and not the master. I ended up keeping my head on a swivel due to “That Guy.”

Yesterday, “That Guy” was a neophyte who just jumped into the gun culture recently and showed up late to class, brought no note taking material and was literally more concerned with taking photos and videos for his Facebook page rather than receiving training and getting immersed in the program of instruction.

“That Guy” also had the audacity to invite his girlfriend to the course in order to take photos and videos of him running two of the reality based training scenarios set up for us in the afternoon. She (That Guy’s Girlfriend) wan’t dressed in the appropriate range attire and was again, a hindrance to training, and she could have created a liability for the instructors and other students. This is exactly why I never allow spectators in any of my courses. This is NOT a criticism of the instructor(s) in this course, I am willing to bet that neither of them knew that he invited her, and that’s normal behavior from a neophyte to do these kinds of things, so as an instructor, you must always be prepared.

Oh by the way, here is a measure of “That Guy’s” competence with a firearm. In the opening range exercise he took ten (10) shots at his target from five (5) yards away and missed 50% of his shots low and left. For a right handed shooter that shows a lack of trigger control,; however, he immediately blamed this on his sights being off and he left the firing line to go retrieve another handgun to use. He did no better with the second handgun. Oh, and not only did “That Guy” NOT ask permission to leave the firing line, he held up the entire course, the instructors and all of the students who were toeing the line and ready to go.

Now, as a professional firearms instructor, I know that it is normal for a neophyte to make excuses and blame their equipment for their deficiencies in basic defensive shooting fundamentals; however, it is the professional who takes notes of their errors and works diligently and deliberately to improve their skills. There is an old saying, “It’s never usually the arrow, always the Indian,” and from five (5) yards away from your target a sight deviation drill will prove that if you press the trigger correctly you will get a hit darn close to your point of aim. I do it in every class to demonstrate how sight alignment works.

My good friend, Major (R) Navarro says, “You are not what you say you are, you are what you do or don’t do.” He’s got that right, this guy is a neophyte.

Here is another important observation concerning “That Guy’s” muzzle direction. It was downright scary and I was shooting two lanes to his left, not a good position with his gun handling skills. Just so you know, he was corrected multiple times by the chief instructor, and each time he made a joke of it.

During the “Hot Wash” or review after each scenario, “That Guy” was very vocal on what he liked and didn’t like, adding in his spin on things. Unfortunately for him, each time he opened his mouth he proved that he was chalk full of unconscious incompetence. Just a more professional way of saying, “you don’t know, what you don’t know. Click on this link to for an brief explanation of the Stages of Learning.

To my fellow students and instructors, “That Guy” can not only be a hindrance to the delivery of the program of instruction, he can be a safety hazard. This means that you must be prepared when you encounter “him” and know exactly how to effectively deal with “That Guy.”.

One last comment, “That Guy” was first in his vehicle and race out of the range to leave, he didn’t stay and help the instructor(s) break down three bays that were set-up or take the time to help with the classroom cleanup. It was obvious what “That Guy” came for, the free training and to run his mouth, not his gun.

 

Until next time …

Live life abundantly!

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

Course Review: GLOCK Operator Course May 9th-10th, 2017 – Smyrna, Georgia

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(Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

On May 9th and 10th I attended the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course held at GLOCK Training – Glock Sport Shooting Foundation Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia.

Eligibility requirements for all open enrollment GLOCK Operator courses are as follows: Active or Reserve Law Enforcement, Active or Reserve Military, Licensed Armed Security Officers, current GSSF Members and current NRA Certified Firearms Instructors. These eligibility requirements can be found here, with additional course information, to include the course outline and expected round count can be found in this PDF.

As I mentioned above, this was GLOCK’s initial open enrollment offering, the first course was a closed course for Law Enforcement Officers only. The students were from many different walks of life. There were four members of the media invited to attend the course by GLOCK’s Media Department including some really big names in gun writing and one other writer who showed up and paid the full course tuition of $300.00. There were five regular Joe’s, all of whom paid the same $300.00 tuition as well. The regular Joe’s were as follows: Two (2) sworn Law Enforcement Officer’s, one (1) United States Army Reserve Captain and GSSF member from North Georgia, a Country Club Manager and GSSF member from North Carolina and of course, yours truly. Additionally there were also three (3) full-time GLOCK employees in attendance as well.

The GLOCK Pistols in attendance consisted mostly of 9mm models, 17’s, 19’s & 34’s, and one GLOCK 40, 10mm long-slide. Personally, I have never seen a student bring a 10mm to a course like this; however, the brave young man who did should be commended, he did very well considering he had a gun with tremendous impulse during the recoil cycle.

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(GLOCK 40, 10mm – Photo Courtesy of Andre’ M. Dall’au)

Our Instructor for the two-day course was Joseph “Willie” Parent, III; Director of Training and GSSF for GLOCK, Inc., Willie is a seventeen (17) year veteran of the United States Marine Corps, and he let you know it with his rigid military bearing, serious demeanor and of course the vernacular he used on the range.

Willie used the term “event driven” many times in a short period of time to describe the course along with explaining that this course was a collaboration of several GLOCK Staff Instructors. He went on to say that they developed this course to help people who own GLOCK platform pistols operate them more efficiently and of course, effectively.

It is worthy to note that it was mentioned more than once that “GLOCK Training doesn’t sell excitement.” From taking this course I can assure you that is a true statement. Nothing about the presentation of this curriculum was exciting. (More on this later)

The round count for this course was advertised at 1,000 and GLOCK company policy is that each student bring only factory ammunition, no hand-loads are allowed in any GLOCK Training course. As someone who has attended a lot of high-volume round count courses, I have learned to give a twenty to twenty-five percent (20%-25%) buffer +/- on the advertised round count, and that estimate has been pretty darned accurate for years. I find that more often than not I have shot less than advertised number. My exact round count for this course was 375 rounds. TD1 round count was 135, TD2 was 240 including the 22 round GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards Test.

Now, I have never been in a course where the round count is 62.5% less than advertised; however, I have seen these things happen to others, and the reason is typically a lack of course content, unfortunately that was not the case here. There was plenty of course content that we didn’t even get to experience, e.g., low-light/no-light techniques and alternate shooting positions. Sadly, our course was shorted, that is the bottom line and you will understand how as you read further.

(Important Note: As a mentor I don’t see it my place to publicly shame someone on social media or on my blog that is read by literally tens of thousands of people, but our job is to never forget the first rule in teaching something; deliver all of the advertised curriculum to your paid students, no matter if your course is “event driven” or not, and do so in a way that minimizes you and your accomplishments and maximizes the curriculum and of course participant involvement. This will allow you to hit the adult learning theorem of hear, see and do in each block of instruction. The student who paid the full tuition will be grateful if you just remember that one simple thing.)

TD1 started in the classroom with a safety briefing that was a combination of Colonel Jeff Cooper’s four universal rules of gun safety and the NRA’s three rules of gun safety. (I really wish Instructors would pick one or the other and not both, and never make them your own by changing the words, it doesn’t add anything to them, in fact it takes away from them) At this time we also received an overview of the GLOCK pistols and their functionality.

The National Sales Manager and Assistant National Sales Manager brought the GLOCK summer releases down from “The Mothership” for us to see. These included the GLOCK 17L Gen 3 and GLOCK 24 Gen 3, both with their 6.02″ barrels, the GLOCK FDE frames and of course the GLOCK 17C & 19C Gen 4 guns. You may not be able to see them in the photos below; however, GLOCK is now offering guns with forward cocking serrations near the muzzle on their guns, that is something new this summer.

Once the classroom presentation was complete, we headed to the indoor range just a few steps away and through a set of double doors. Once inside we made sure our guns were clear and started with dry-fire presentations from the holster (Open Carry) at fifteen (15) yards while in an “interview position.” This position is similar to the position that a Law Enforcement Officer might use when speaking to someone just outside of arms length. Our Instructor taught what I call the “press out” presentation or the upside-down “L” and not the index presentation.

Once we were done with dry-fire presentations, we were then taught how to properly load a GLOCK pistol. This exercise was done by Instructor demonstration only, there was no student involvement in this exercise which surprised me because that goes against the adult learning theorem of hear, see and do. Besides, we were all instructed by the course outline to bring ten (10) dummy rounds each, this would have been a great opportunity to use them.

We then started on the course of fire standing on the fifteen (15) yard line shooting ten rounds slow-fire. The Instructors command of “Shooter Ready, Target” was our queue to present our pistol and fire. The target used was an NRA B-8 target. (See Below) We repeated this exercise three times alternating relays and pasting all misses that hit outside of the nine ring.

I had recently installed a new set of Ameriglo I-Dot sights (GL-301) on my GLOCK 19C Gen 3, and I needed to get used to the proper sight picture at fifteen (15) yards. In my first go around I had only three of ten hits inside the nine ring; however, after I made a slight adjustment in sight picture my group was spot on. (Pardon the pun) After we completed this drill, we took a lunch break for an hour.

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(The NRA B-8 Target)

If you attend this course at GLOCK Training/GSSF Headquarters in Smyrna, there are several small local restaurants close by; however, I suggest that you bring a cooler if you are driving and eat your lunch there in the classroom, that way you are not rushed going somewhere to eat and then making it back on time afterwards.

We reconvened in the range after lunch we started shooting pairs at fifteen (15) yards, again starting in the interview position and upon command. I found this very weird as there was really no reason to be “banging pairs” from fifteen yards away, this does nothing for marksmanship fundamentals or allows an diagnostics to take place; however, after shooting three iterations of pairs we then started working on slide-lock, empty-gun or emergency reloads depending on the terminology that you use.

Willie showed us four of the six ways Instructors teach their students to send the slide into battery after a reload and emphasized that the power-stroke was the way we should be doing it with the GLOCK platform pistol. (The power-stroke has the shooter cupping the support hand over the rear of slide and pulling it back using the thumb and fingers on the cocking serrations on the rear of the slide so the recoil spring assembly or RSA for short is fully compressed before you release it. Provided you have a good RSA, this action creates maximum inertia in launching the slide forward into battery)

Next we performed the one shot, slide-lock reload, and one shot drill working on perfect technique. This is a very good drill and one I use on a regular basis to improve my reload speeds.

Next we started shooting silhouette targets while preforming what Willie called, “immediate and remedial action” drills. These terms are nothing more than military jargon for clearing common stoppages and malfunctions, e.g., failure to fire, failure to eject, failure to extract etc…

Next we worked on failure to stop, or the Mozambique drill from the seven (7) yard line and we ran though this three times per relay. The Mozambique drill is two shots to the chest and one to the head performed from the holster or a ready position, we performed it from the holster. Once we finished this drill, TD1 was in the books.

It is also worthy to note that all drills were performed from either a low-ready or from open carry on TD1, there was no option to work from concealment, even for an experienced student.

TD2 started with a good breakfast at the Holiday Inn Express Atlanta Galleria area and upon checkout I was given a one-day credit on my bill because our room was not serviced for us while we were training the day prior. That was nice of the hotel management to offer and do that for me, after all I am an IHG member.

TD2 of the GLOCK Operator Course started in the classroom with a review of the safety rules from TD1 and then we headed into the range and started with a drill that is designed to help the student with trigger control. Candidly, this drill should have been the first drill after dry-fire presentations on TD1; however, it wasn’t me that wrote the course of fire and I was there to learn, it just seemed awful strange doing a drill that is used to teach the shooter about trigger control when we had already shot 135 rounds on TD1.

We then proceeded to shoot this drill from three, five and seven yards on an NRA B-8 target. During the first iteration we were instructed to pin the trigger to the rear and then let it reset after our sights were back on target. Firearms training industry titan John Farnam calls this, “catching the link.” In the second iteration we would go through resetting the trigger under the impulse of recoil, and in the third iteration we were to speed reset the trigger while firing pairs. I found this drill to be of little value as I do not nor would I ever teach pining the trigger to the rear and catching the link as you ride the reset forward.

Catching the link can have disastrous results if not done properly and with a loss of fine motor skills that will occur under stress this might just cause you to freeze when resetting the trigger, I have seen it too many times with Law Enforcement Officers being taught the fundamentals of trigger control improperly and because they pin the trigger to the rear they lose time on their qualifications, not to mention what might happen if they are in a gunfight with a hardened criminal who does not see handcuffs in his or her future.

We then performed this same drill at ten (10), twelve and a half (12.5) and fifteen (15) yards, only this time we were shooting a silhouette target center chest. Again, there is no value in doing this at distance, there are much better drills to help the student understand proper trigger control and cadence. With the experienced shooters we had in this course this drill could have been easily done in one or two iterations from three or five yards, yet we wasted time doing this out to fifteen (15) yards. Again, this drill is a TD1 drill in any course I have ever been to, but not the GLOCK Operator Course.

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The flames you see are the burning gases exiting the ports in the barrel of my GLOCK 19C Gen 3 as I shoot a drill at the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course in Smyrna, Georgia on May 9th & 10th, 2017. (Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

After a short break we came back to find the NRA B-8 targets back up again and the next drill was the ball and dummy drill. Again, this is a drill that should have been done on TD1, not TD2.

In this drill we gave a fellow student a couple magazines and shot this drill at the twenty-five (25) yard line. This is way too far away from the target for this drill. Each iteration was from the holster, presenting the pistol and firing one shot. If we were on a dummy round and we caused the sights to deviate, we were supposed to tell our coach (Fellow Student) what we did wrong. The Instructor told us that saying “I anticipated” was not acceptable, he’s right about that, not everything is an anticipation or flinch. As shooters, we were to describe exactly what we did to cause the sights deviate off of our intended point of aim.

We then went on to shooting multiple targets with pairs to the high center chest area of a silhouette target from the holster. This drill was done from the seven (7) yard line and we were to change the target that we started with during each iteration. In this drill you must make sure to not “out-drive your headlights” as my mentor Tom Givens says. In case you are wondering, your headlights are your eyes, and to get good hits on the target or threat you are transitioning to you must move your head first and then bring the gun to your eyes and engage the second target or threat. See the example in the photos below.

Engaging multiple targets from the holster. (Photos Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

The next drill we worked on was a box drill. This is where you shoot two rounds to the torso and one round to the head on multiple targets. This drill is basically a failure to stop or Mozambique drill using two targets and taking the two head shots after you engage the second target or threat with a pair to the chest and then transition back to the first target and taking a head shot on that target as well.

After a break we started shooting on the move. First with moving forward from the fifteen (15) yard line all the way to the one (1) yard line while engaging a silhouette target high center chest. When the Instructor demonstrated this drill he was visibly upset with himself when he missed a single shot and even said so in front of the class. As a student I found this to be unprofessional and as an Instructor I was embarrassed for him. Unfortunately this was not an isolated incident, Willie had made this mistake on multiple occasions; however, this time it was pronounced and instead of him using his misses as a teachable moment to explain to the students why he missed the shot, he was down on himself and said out loud that he was worried about the writers making light of this miss in their articles and blogs.

Candidly at this point I had heard about enough and had to chime in, “Let’s focus on the positive here, you shot sixteen or seventeen rounds and missed one, I’d say that is a good hit to miss ratio.” After I said that, several students approached me on lunch break and thanked me for having the courage to say that, because this was beginning to be a common theme and unfortunately that is basically what we were subjected to for two days.

Once each student had run through moving forward on a threat three times we took a lunch break for an hour.

After lunch we worked on moving to the rear from three to seven yards again shooting a silhouette target high center chest. I didn’t mention it before, but the key to any movement drill, no matter the direction you are moving is to press the trigger when you have an acceptable sight picture or sight movie as Gabe White refers to it.

After a short break we were then introduced to shooting on the move left and right at the seven yard line. This technique was new to many of the shooters and some struggled with the footwork associated. Similar to moving rearward we ran through this dry-fire once and live-fire once.

Next we worked on strong hand and support hand only shooting from the ten yard line and then we went dry for nearly two hours working on one handed manipulation drills using our strong hand and weak hand only. Two students showed their techniques to draw the gun from their holsters using the support hand only. These are techniques that I had seen before; however, I tried several different ones until I settled in on the one I have been using for years.

We then worked on more one handed manipulations including clearing malfunctions and reloading the pistol with strong hand and support hand only. The safety protocol was very high with these drills, and thus we only preformed the drills dry-fire with dummy rounds.

After a short break we were introduced to the GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards. This is an evaluation, not a qualification of your skills under the pressure of a shot timer. Due to all the wasted time in the course each student only got one try at the pistol standards test, even though the scoring sheet had room for three separate tests as they refer to them at GLOCK Training. Considering all of the penalties I had my score was a very disappointing Level 1; however, when I returned home, I was able to run the same exact course of fire three times in a row cold, scoring a very respectable Level 3, each time.

Please do not ask me to share the GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards with you, it’s not going to happen. One has to protect the integrity of the course so new students don’t try to practice the evaluation standards in preparation of the course.

This will not be a surprise to the instructor as I left many of these comments on my written course review before leaving the building; however, as both a student and fellow instructor I am not sure Willie is the right instructor to deliver this curriculum and I cannot recommend this course to anyone at this time.

As a mentor, I would jump at the opportunity to work with Willie in polishing his presentations and this course of fire so it makes sense, and flows better so the students can see all of it.

Sadly, I could have saved nearly $750.00 in tuition, hotel charges, gas, food the 625 rounds I never fired, not to mention sixteen hours worth of windshield time, had I known this was going to be the result.

As a good friend told me, “Gordon, someone had to be the guinea pig.” If GLOCK Training offered me a seat in the course again I would take it, and maybe I might get a chance to see the entire course of fire and run all the drills; however, after publishing this course review, and even offering to mentor Willie, I don’t see that ever happening, then again surprises do happen.

Oh, nearly a month has passed since the course and I did receive this nice GLOCK Operator PVC Patch in the mail, I will put it with all the other patches I collect and remember what might have been.

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Just remember, as a student you must be willing to pick up the brass on the range, and my good friend Paul caught me doing what I do best with a walnut picker.

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(Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

#GLOCK #GLOCKTraining #GSSF #GlockOperatorCourse

Until next time …

Live life abundantly!

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

My experiences at the 2017 NRA Annual Meetings

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Last weekend I attended the National Rifle Association‘s Annual Meetings of members in Atlanta, Georgia. The NRAAM was held at the Georgia World Congress Center (GWCC) and attendance has been announced right at 81,000 for the weekend. I wonder if President Donald J. Trump was counted in that number. Isn’t it refreshing to have a pro-second amendment President after the eight years we endured from January 20th, 2009 to January 20th, 2017? Sure, gun sales, accessories and ammunition sales set all time records year over year, but it sure is nice having a “friend” living at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Overall, the Georgia World Congress Center was excellent. Save one set of escalators being broken, there were enough elevators and other ways to get up and down the five floors of this enormous facility, and I didn’t see adding a hundred or more steps to my daily total as a hindrance. Even the restrooms had maintenance workers stationed near by to ensure cleanliness and the security guards were attentive and tried to be helpful whenever possible with directions etc…

The show floor could comfortably fit eight football fields inside and still have room left over. There were booths on each floor with the NRA Store situated on the fourth floor, you can be well assured that I left a little lighter in the wallet after my visit.

This NRAAM showcased the NRA’s new Insurance and Training products, NRA Carry Guard and NRA Carry Guard Training. More to come in a separate blog posting very soon, stay tuned!

So, it all started for me on Thursday afternoon and candidly, I owe my friend Marty from the Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network an apology for not helping both he and Vincent with the heavy lifting. In case you didn’t know, Marty and his wife Gila are a couple titans of the firearms training industry. They have built a firearms training academy that is in the top tier of what this industry has to offer in little old friendly Onalaska, Washington. If you are looking for high quality training and want your skills tested by some of the top trainers in the country, make sure to attend a course at Firearms Academy of Seattle; you will leave with far better skills than what you brought. Oh by the way, Marty and Gila were chosen by the worlds premier firearms training academy, GunSite Academy to host several off-site courses in 2017, that speaks volumes about these folks, both of whom I am honored to call friends of mine.

My volunteer efforts at the NRAAM afforded me access to the exhibition hall while the vendors were setting up their booths and displaying their products on Thursday afternoon, kind of cool to get a “sneak peek” that was authorized; however, at 3:00pm I was firmly seated in room B-203 attending the Firearms Examiner meeting. My volunteer commitment was Thursday afternoon and Friday morning, then to be on-call Saturday and Sunday to inspect any firearms that may have come in late and make sure they were inoperable, even if loaded with a live cartridge.

After checking somewhere south of five-hundred (500) guns the three person team I was assigned to decided we could not do anything more as the vendors in our area were not set up yet.  So, we returned on Friday morning at 7:00am to start again in our designated section and finish checking the guns we were assigned. Thankfully there were no unintended or negligent discharges at the NRAAM this year. (By the way, those tend to happen at these events when ignorant people administratively handle their “carry gun” and show it off to others, never a bright idea)

If you get a chance to volunteer at the NRA Annual Meetings, do it. NRA Certified Instructor, Greg Baird, the NRA’s volunteer coordinator is a class act in every way and he and his team need help is many areas like; the NRA Store, Eddie Eagle, Membership Registrations, NRA Youth Day, the air gun range and of course Firearms Examiners.

Just after the ribbon cutting ceremony on Friday morning I was able to get a photo with someone I have respected my entire adult life; NRA Board Member, Richard Childress. I am a big fan of his, not only because of his unwavering support for our Second Amendment rights, but also because of the way he conducts his business as a person and as the owner of one of the most successful NASCAR teams in history. For me there is Richard Childress Racing, and everybody else is a few laps down at the start-finish line.

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A little earlier Friday morning I received a text message from my good friend Santiago Cuellar, from Godspeed Firearms School. Santi is a sneaky devil, surprising me by saying he was coming to the NRAAM for a few hours before heading home to south Florida after a business trip. Santi is an excellent trainer and a really good friend, I was very surprised and delighted to see him in Atlanta.

AAA Me and Santi Cuellar

After saying goodbye to Santi, it was time to get “Brother Vern” registered. I have known this guy a long time. Seems like yesterday I was a Sergeant and he a Private in the Green Machine, but that was 30 years ago when I met my main man “Vern.” Him flying down to Atlanta just to spend the weekend with me and attend his first NRAAM made this a real special weekend. V-E-R-N thoroughly enjoyed himself, but got quite distracted by all the shiny things to see everywhere. I ended up saying “squirrel” a lot just to make him laugh. This guy is one of my very best friends, one that I would want in a foxhole with me. Those who served know exactly what I mean by that, V-E-R-N is 100% my brother.

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Later on Friday I hosted a dinner for some pretty awesome people. Many of these folks are NRA Training Counselors. We met at Ted’s Montana Grill on Luckie Street. The proprietor there, Michael St. Bernard is a great guy, he and his staff did a fine job. Everyone said their food was excellent, having been to Ted’s before I knew that would be the case and part of the reason why I chose this particular place to host our dinner. So, what’s a gathering like this if we didn’t take a group photo? Again, I’d like to give a big thank you to everyone, several of you have suggested that we make this an annual event, and I think that is a great suggestion.

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On Saturday morning I woke up at my usual 5:30am not the 4:30am I had the previous two days and went to work out in the hotel fitness center, then I waited for Vern to get his heart started so we could head out to the NRAAM.

Saturday was all about hitting as many exhibits as we could, I was still on-call for my duties as a Firearms Examiner, but my first stop was at the Benchmade Knife Company booth so I could drop off my Mini Reflex II automatic to get sharpened and a deep carry clip added. Both were done free of charge and they sent me a text message when my knife was ready for pick-up. Now that’s what I call great customer service. Thanks Benchmade, I am a customer for life!

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Saturday at the NRAAM is the day that John Howard, NRA National Training Manager hosts his annual Trainers’ Update. This years update started off with John introducing the speakers and immediately Dr. Joe Logar took the microphone and gave an excellent presentation on the NRA’s Adaptive Shooting program. If you are an NRA Certified Instructor, Training Counselor or Coach you need to get to know Dr, Joe Logar, he can help you with ideas to train those athletes and responsibly armed citizens that have physical challenges. Dr. Logar can be reached via email at jlogar@nrahq.org

Next up was NRA Training Counselor, Klint Macro and his presentation on the new Pistol “Program.” Nothing really earth-shattering here, just information that if you have received the NRA Trainers’ Updates via email you would know already. Unfortunately many people do not receive those updates and the NRA needs to fix this so everyone is getting information disseminated directly from the Education & Training Department via email and not having to rely on asking questions of the “hive” on Facebook even though their Training Counselor should be their first point of contact.

Klint’s presentation went a little long and led John Howard to announce that we were going to take a break before National Coach Trainer Daniel Subia’s presentation on the NRA Coaching program. This break totally broke the inertia of the update because nearly everyone in attendance flocked toward John and his staff to ask questions and get their face-time. I have attended the Trainers’ Update three of the four years they have been held and I have never seen John call for a break, not once. When the five minute break was up, Daniel and his guest presenter had to wait until everyone finally exited the room to start their presentations and they were left with maybe a dozen of us. IMHO, the coaching program presenters should have been afforded the same courtesy in making their presentations to the entire assembly of Instructors, Training Counselors and Coaches just as Dr. Logar and Klint were able to do, unencumbered by a break. Extremely poor time management led to this ball being dropped, and it is a shame because we need more people in the coaching ranks. Maybe in 2018 Daniel can lead off the Trainers’ Update.

There was no information given at the Trainers’ Update on NRA Carry Guard Training, I bet you a cookie that all of that information is being closely held by Ackerman-McQueen who handles all of the advertising and marketing for the NRA and the NRA Carry Guard Insurance and NRA Carry Guard Training programs.

One of the really cool things in the back of the room, Tony and Rob Lambraia had a makeshift UTM firing line set up for all Instructors to try the UTM training cartridges. If you are not using UTM in your training, you might want to consider it, they are excellent for Force on Force scenario-based training. Find out more about UTM by visiting their website at: https://utmworldwide.com/

After the presentation on coaching, I was able to meet and speak with Mike Hughes, Founder and CEO of NextLevel Training, Mike is the man behind the SIRT Training Pistol. I shared a real success story with him about a student/instructor of mine who greatly improved his defensive marksmanship skills by using a SIRT Training Pistol over a period of about a month. This student had a target grouping that looked like a shotgun pattern in my defensive pistol course and I worked with him to make some improvements during the course; however, after working with the SIRT for a few weeks he came back to me for another course and qualified easily, with a really tight grouping all the way back to 15 yards. The SIRT Training Pistol works, you just got to buy one and put in the time and effort to press the trigger correctly to get the desired result. It’s called “practice” yes, we talkin’ ’bout practice. (Thank you Allen Iverson)

Of course the NRAAM is also about meeting old friends and new ones as well. On Saturday afternoon I introduced my friend to “Uncle Mas” and bought him a gift membership to the Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network, so he is now part of the ACLDN family. I wanted to get Uncle Mas to call him “Young Brother” but that didn’t happen; however, Vern did get a signed copy of “Gun Safety In the Home.” Thank you Marty, Gila, Vincent, Uncle Mas, Gail and all of those with the ACLDN family.

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Additionally on Saturday I was able to spend some time at the Colt booth talking with firearms training industry giants, Ken Hackathorn, Larry Vickers and Daryl Holland. I was fortunate to be able to spend a fair amount of time with both Ken and Daryl, but Larry had a book signing at the booth, and business is business. I will be taking a course with Ken later this year, and hope to have dinner with him as well. Later in the afternoon I found Ken once again and showed him a photo of my friend Steve standing next to him at a course in Arizona a couple years ago. Ken recognized him immediately and said, “I remember him, he was shooting a Glock 19, and was a good shooter too” both observations were spot-on.

Daryl Holland and I spent a little time talking about hog hunting in Florida, I had no idea he used to live just a few miles from me in Land O’Lakes. I proceeded to ask him for some suggestions for my Colt M4 platform rifle, e.g., what optic he recommended for it and such. It looks like I will be buying a Trijicon MRO® – 2.0 MOA Red Dot. I am a minimalist when it comes to optics on my M4 and this red dot fits that mold. I wanted an unbiased suggestion from a recognized subject matter expert on what he would use and I believe he gave it. I left with Daryl’s contact information and said that I might see him at Universal Shooting Academy for his handgun/carbine course with Shannon Smith in January 2018 or I would host him myself in the Tampa Bay area. One way or another, I will run my gun in a Daryl Holland course in the not too distant future.

Next up, Vern bought a standard edition “Vickers Guide: AR-15 Volume 1.” Larry autographed it for him and was very gracious. Many people tell me that Larry is unapproachable and kind of surly. I call B.S., I found him to be neither of those in fact, quite the opposite. Larry did an execellent job in putting this book together, should we expect anything else from someone of his caliber? If you are interested, you can purchase your copy of Larry’s book directly from him at https://www.vickersguide.com/ – You can also find more products in the link below. I am a big fan of the floor plates that he designed for Glock magazines. They work very well when you have to strip a magazine out of a gun because of a stoppage in the cycle of operation. http://www.vickerstactical.com/products.html

By the way, you can be sure that I will do my best to host Larry in the Tampa Bay area in 2018.

AAA Vern with LAV

On both Friday and Saturday I spent some time at the Sig Sauer booth talking with Steven Gilcreast about my upcoming trip to Sig Sauer Academy, Steve checked his schedule and it looks like he will be my Instructor later this summer. I was also fortunate enough to meet Adam Panchaud the Vice-President of Sig Sauer Academy, both Steve and Adam are keenly aware that I am looking forward to training at Sig Sauer Academy.

Now, have a look at this beauty below. Meet the Sig Sauer P320 X-Carry, it is due to be released in about a month. Check out that flat trigger, undercut on the trigger guard and enhanced beaver tail. This gun also has a relief cut on the top of the slide and is milled for a Mini Red Dot as well. I am told that this gun will be added to the Active & Retired Law Enforcement/Military & Instructor discount program at 25% off MSRP. I am currently working with the fine folks at Sig Sauer to get one for Testing & Evaluation so I can write an article that I have been asked to do for one of the gun magazines. Stay tuned!

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Saturday ended with dinner and a great conversation with Paul Pawela and his girlfriend Linda along with my friend, Vern. Paul is Director of Law Enforcement Training at the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum in Titusville, Florida. He is also a former Special Forces Operator and sworn Police Officer; his company, Assault Counter Tactics specializes in reality-based scenario training. I plan to host Paul this fall for a Vehicle Counter Ambush Course in the Tampa Bay area.

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Sunday morning I started again with a workout and then it was off to breakfast with Vern before heading to GWCC. Sunday’s are great at the NRAAM, you can actually walk though the exhibits most of the day without worrying if or when someone will step on your heels. Vern bought a couple barrels for his rifles and I had Travis Hall (Retired Special Forces Medic) educate me on how to properly pack the Blue Force Gear; Micro Trauma Kit that I purchased on Saturday afternoon. You can learn more about Travis by following his business Facebook page at Second Chance Medical Consulting or on the world wide web at http://secondchancemed.com/.

Also on Sunday I made another stop at Patriot Ordinance Factory (POF-USA for short) to see Tony and his team there. POF-USA makes a superb rifle, I have always liked their Gen4 lower and have had my eye on a P415 Edge or a Renegade+ for a while now. I like the gas piston guns like the P415 Edge, but I am also partial to direct impingement guns like the Renegade+, I need to flip a coin or just get it over with and buy both of them. Take a look at them in the hyperlinks that I created above.

Finally Vern and I zig-zagged the exhibit hall for a couple more hours and then then we decided to leave and get some chow at Twin Smokers BBQ. When we entered the restaurant there was NRA-ILA Executive Director, Chris Cox enjoying his dinner. We had just met Chris and shook his hand on the floor at the exhibit hall a couple hours prior. When he left he waived and shook some hands and thanked everyone for coming to Atlanta and attending the NRA Annual Meetings. Chris and Wayne LaPierre are the two hardest working people in the building located at 11250 Waples Mill Road in Fairfax, Virginia. They are both on the front line every single day protecting our Second Amendment rights.

Once Chris left, Vern and I went about our business of smashing some barbecue and talking about the old days when we were younger, had better eyesight and could run four or five miles out the back gate at North Fort Lewis with our rucksacks on for PT. Yeah, my man Vern is a one of a kind, I am grateful that he came down to visit and enjoy his first NRAAM. “Squirrel”

The only thing I didn’t get to see at the NRAAM was President Donald J. Trump. The President gave a speech to the NRA-ILA Leadership Forum, if you missed it, I have placed a link here.

In summary; I had a great time, I always do at this event. As I said a few times, I met up some old friends, made some new ones and got some possibilities for future course offerings from some of the top names in our industry.

Ironically I will be back in the Atlanta area next week attending the new Glock Operators Course at the “mother ship” in Smyrna. Be looking for a course review here on Thursday when I return home. I will also be submitting an article on the course to a few of the gun magazines as well, so stay tuned.

Live life abundantly my friends!

Until next time …

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

Course Review: Assault Counter Tactics; Vehicle Counter Ambush Course, April 15, 2017; Titusville, Florida

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

This past Saturday I attended Paul Pawela’s Assault Counter Tactics, Vehicle Counter Ambush Course in Titusville, Florida at the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum. The course was set up to provide training and to honor United States Army Colonel (R) Danny McKnight, Battalion Commander 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment during the Battle of Mogadishu. The event was sponsored by Nate Love with Frontier Tactical in Brooksville, Florida and Spartan Training Gear.

I arrived at about forty-five minutes early using less than a half tank of gas on the 2.5 hour drive from the Tampa Bay area. When Paul and Linda arrived, I introduced myself and jumped right in to help them unload their equipment.

Before the course started I had the opportunity to walk around the Museum (I had been there once before, but it was after hours) and check out all of the displays including the gun range and their extensive display of patches and badges from law enforcement agencies all across the country. I was impressed by the display of artifacts dedicated to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and the murder of Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit. The American Police Hall of Fame & Museum is a beautiful facility and one you must see if traveling anywhere near Florida’s Space Coast.

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(Photo Credit: Trigger Control Dot Org)

A little after 0900hrs the course started with Paul giving us a safety briefing on the four universal safety rules and to let us know that we must all disarm and make sure that we do not have any firearms and other weapons on our person during our participation at the five stations he had set up for us. After the safety briefing and making sure everyone had filled out a waiver Paul introduced Colonel (R) Danny McKnight.

Colonel McKnight spoke a little about what his role would be in the training and he graciously offered to personalize a copy of his book, Streets of Mogadishu: Leadership at it’s best, political correctness at it’s worst!” Make sure you pick up a copy on his website at: http://dannymcknight.com/bookdvd.htm

The other presenters who spoke before training commenced were Manuel (Manny) Cabrera of Sidekicks Family Martial Arts Center, and E.J. Owens founder of Legally Concealed and author of “Counter Violence; your guide to surviving a deadly encounter.”

The training day consisted of the twenty-two participants being broken down into five small groups to participate in reality-based scenario training on the grounds of the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum.

My first station was a scenario where a responsibly armed citizen drove up on a machete wielding man bludgeoning someone to death. The citizen had to dismount his vehicle (4-Door Jeep) and access an AR platform rifle in the back of the vehicle, load it and engage the machete wielding killer. Students were graded on proper use of cover/concealment and while under stress if they could manipulate a rifle in order to stop the threat from killing more innocent civilians. Overall this was a great station and if you are not carrying a firearm in your person, you may have to access a long gun that is somewhere else in your vehicle to stop a spree killer. The use of Ultimate Training Munitions (UTM) made this station a true force on force scenario. By the way I played an unprepared victim having my hands in my pockets. 🙂

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Machete
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was with E.J. Owens, E.J. led our group through another scenario where we were loaded in the cab of a four-door Ford Super Duty and participants in certain seats were given Glock 17T‘s loaded with Simunition cartridges. E.J. explained that when in a vehicle you must be aware of the angles that you can shoot at considering the A-pillar and B-pillar may be in the way. We also talked about shooting through automotive glass and through door panels and how that may effect the trajectory of the projectile you are firing. We also talked about where you might want to be carrying your firearm so you can access it in case something like this happens to you. Remember, a handgun is commonly referred to as a side-arm because it should be at your side or more appropriately on your person and not in a glove compartment, center console box or for heaven’s sake not under the seat.

In the two scenarios in which I participated in, I was sitting in the driver’s seat. In scenario number one two armed men approached the vehicle on my side demanding the vehicle and money. I extinguished both of them with one shot each to their chest protectors and the scenario ended. In scenario number two I did not have a firearm, the person in the passenger seat did. While stopped an unarmed man came up to my window demanding money, but not posing a threat and as I was pushing the guy away from the vehicle the passenger made an attempt to shoot him. This was clearly a no-shoot situation; however, the decision the passenger made had deadly consequences for me, because he actually shot me with the Simunition cartridge. (In reality he shot my shirt; however, I felt no impact from the cartridge even though there was Simunition paint marking on my shirt) The lesson learned here is quite simple, don’t shoot your friend who is driving the vehicle. This was an excellent scenario, very realistic with the use of the Glock 17T’s and the Simunition cartridges.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 EJ station
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was set up with the participant walking in a parking lot to their vehicle and an actor approaches them asking for money. There were armed and unarmed confrontations, students were graded on if they could use “verbal judo” and keep the actor away from them and recognize the threat in time to draw their concealed firearm and deal with the situation. As with every encounter, you must watch the hands, they don’t lie and when someone you perceive to be a threat makes a furtive movement around their waist after you have given them commands “Get back, stay back” then you better be ready to use or threaten to use deadly force. (In Florida there are provisions in the statutes for the threatened use of deadly force) Again, overall a good scenario, the only thing I would have done a little different is added in some blank firing guns to make this a lot more realistic.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Bob
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was geared toward armed confrontations and handgun disarming techniques with Manny Cabrera. At this station we were introduced to Krav Maga handgun disarming techniques. Since I was there to learn I had an open mind and tried the Krav Maga technique; however, being that I was trained in the Lindell system of weapon retention and disarming I knew it would be very difficult for me to change those techniques since I have habituated them into a highly refined skill. The other part of this station had us in the driver’s seat of a sedan with the windows down. We were approached by an armed assailant and had to disarm him through the window and then given another technique to pin the gun against the dashboard near the A-pillar and then drive off. We also had a scenario where the armed assailant entered the vehicle in through a rear door and we had to disarm him in the car. Overall this was a good set of scenarios, as with the others they are problem solving and decision making then acting on our decisions.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Manny
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

Lastly we worked on team tactics and some situational awareness skills with Andy Tolbert of Strong Defenses. These scenarios focused on how we must pay attention when riding in a car to the things happening around us at a traffic light. (The guy who comes up to wash your windshield at the intersection. The aggressive panhandler, etc…) The scenarios we ran here were great, as usual, Andy did an awesome job. (I might be a little biased since I trained with her a couple times and certified her in two NRA disciplines as well)

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Andy
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

To summarize, this course was well thought out by Chief Instructor Paul Pawela and well executed by his team of Instructors. The scenarios were realistic to the things we see on a daily basis while watching the evening news.

Quoting the one and only Massad Ayoob, “Whether the fight is verbal or physical, the first law of human conflict is to be able to predict where the attack will come, and already have a counter in place for it.”

This course was well worth the $200.00 tuition and the proceeds benefited a real American hero, Colonel Danny McKnight. If you missed it, don’t feel bad, there will be others and I will host Paul in the Tampa Bay area for this course in the future. You can also find out Paul’s schedule by following his business Facebook page at: Assault Counter Tactics or find him on the world wide web at: http://www.assaultcountertactics.com/

 

Until next time …

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

So, what is in your E.D.C.?

IMG_6432

  • Glock 19C Gen 3 w/Ameriglo I-Dot Pro Sights and a Blade-Tech Klipt AIWB holster
  • Spare Glock 19 Magazine w/OEM +2 baseplate Safariland 123 Horizontal Mag Pouch
  • Benchmade Mini Reflex Auto
  • Cold Steel Spartan
  • SOFT-T Wide Tourniquet in an Eleven 10 case
  • Monadnock D-Jammer/Kubotan Keychain
  • Griffin Pepper Strike w/Fury OC spray
  • Surefire E2D LED Defender Ultra
  • Wallet
  • iPhone 7+

All easily concealable in pockets and on my belt.

Practice your ABC’s …

Stay Safe & Train Hard!