Course Review: Defense Training International Advanced Defensive Handgun & Instructor Courses; November 17th – 19th, 2017 – New Plymouth, Ohio

“The time to prepare for your next shooting is now.” – John Farnam

Recently I attended the Defense Training International (John & Vicki Farnam) Advanced Defensive Handgun and the DTI Instructor Course in New Plymouth, Ohio.

Many of you probably know that John Farnam and Ken Hackathorn were two of the very first Instructors to take their Program of Instruction (POI) on the road and train Law Enforcement Officers, Active Duty Servicemembers and Responsibly Armed Citizens back in the 1970’s and if you didn’t, you do now. John and his wife Vicki, who have been training together as husband and wife for the past thirty-one (31) years are “Industry Giants” and if you have not trained with them yet, you really need to make that happen.

In case you didn’t know, John is also a long time advisory board member of Marty and Gila Hayes’ Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network along with other industry giants like Massad Ayoob, Jim Fleming, Tom Givens, Emanuel Kapelsohn, and Dennis Tueller. (In full disclosure I am a member of the network as well)

Let’s get to the course information. Friday morning, bright and early my friend Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC and I met the Farnam’s for breakfast and then we took the thirty-minute drive to the range so we could get started promptly at 9:00am. The weekend schedule was as follows, DTI Advanced Defensive Handgun Course on Friday and the DTI Instructor Course on Saturday and Sunday.

We started all three days in the classroom and on Friday John began discussing the art and science of defensive shooting and his “Four D’s of Fighting.”

  1. Divide his focus.
  2. Disrupt his plan.
  3. Disable his body.
  4. Destroy his will to fight.

During the classroom lecture, John talked a lot about the immediate aftermath of a self-defense shooting. His background as a law enforcement officer and a top industry trainer for somewhere north of forty (40) years gives him the credibility of a subject matter expert in this area. Folks, we’re talking about how to handle the 9-1-1 call, and how to answer questions from responding officers at the scene without talking yourself into a pair of handcuffs. (Never once was the words, “I was in fear for my life” spoken, I say this just to prove how infantile that expression has become)

While inside the classroom we also worked on some handgun retention and disarming techniques. John believes that it is more likely that you might have to disarm someone rather than shoot them, especially when you are within arms reach of your assailant. This is an area of Defensive Tactics that I wish more responsibly armed citizens would spend some time in training and not in the Dojo. In the law enforcement community, there are plenty of hours spent training these skills.

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(Photo: John demonstrating handgun disarms with Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC)

Once on the range, we were introduced to the Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Targets. These targets are absolutely diabolical, and shooting at them around simulated friendlies and or cover is not easy at all especially from distance. John and Vicki’s POI is all about moving off the line of force so you won’t be standing with your feet in cement while you present your handgun, and they get you moving after each four-round burst. Move and re-engage the threat/target from your new position and move while reloading as well. There is absolutely no need to stay stationary in a gunfight, that is unless you want to get shot.

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(Photo: Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Target)

The Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Targets have 8″ square paddles on them and in order to get them to rotate you must get your hits precisely in the right place and at precisely the right time so you can keep the inertia going. This can be both mentally and physically challenging as you’ve got to make every shot count, a missed shot breaks the inertia you’ve built up and next thing you know you have missed several times in a row because you get frustrated. All of us pitched our share shots during the course, it’s how we followed up those misses that counts.

During our range exercises, John emphasized his checklist that includes scanning and movement, reloading, creating distance from the threat, finding cover, checking yourself for injuries, accounting for everyone who might be hurt and finally calling 9-1-1. We practiced these things on the range after each drill and John would ask us key questions to prepare our “tape loop” for the immediate aftermath when law enforcement arrives on the scene.

It is worthwhile to note that John and Vicki run a hot range and will not allow a student or instructor candidate to ever holster an empty gun. An empty gun in a holster is useless and furthermore, it is dangerous because it adds to the administrative handling of the gun and most “accidents” happen during the administrative handling of guns. (Holstering) John’s range instructions are purposely vague, you have to be a thinker in his course and apply the instructions given into a plan to solve the problem.

The Farnam’s are also big on demonstrations as well. They believe as I do, a firearms instructor/teacher must be able to step up cold on demand and demonstrate drills to standard for their students. One has to be able to explain, demonstrate, and coach their students through drills, they must also give the “why” in training, most instructors can’t because they only regurgitate what they heard some instructor say or worse, what they read on the internet. If you heard it from John, he probably coined the phrase or developed the POI being taught.

During the Instructor course, John quoted these words many times as a way to emphasize the need to teach to the adult learning theorem, “What I hear, I forget; What I see, I remember; What I do, I understand.” He also made us keenly aware that feelings may be hurt during the course, it’s normal and part of the learning process. (My friend Steve mentioned that many sacred cows were slaughtered over the weekend)

On TD2 of the Instructor course, we got an excellent presentation from Vicki on teaching women. Her POI is based on her book, “Teaching Women to Shoot.” John and Vicki’s books can be purchased through the DTI Bookshelf at http://defense-training.com/

Additionally, the DTI Instructor course comes with a comprehensive Instructor Manual; however, you can find the POI well outlined in John’s book, “The Farnam Method of Defensive Handgunning.” I would highly suggest that you buy this book (And read it) before attending any DTI Handgun course, especially the Advanced Defensive Handgun course or the DTI Instructor course, you will thank me for that advice and you will be well prepared if you act on it.

Make sure that you prepare for some presentations as well, you will need to give them in front of your classmates cold on demand and with no preparation time. John and Vicki put pressure on their Instructors to perform. Thus you are assigned a subject and you must give a five-minute presentation and answer questions from the students and of course be prepared for Mabel to show up. (That’s Vicki’s alter ego)

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(Photo: My closing presentation last Sunday during the DTI Instructors Course)

In summary, I mentioned earlier that these two courses pushed me both mentally and physically and the qualification is not particularly easy. I was able to pass in seven (7) shots and some thirteen (13) seconds and change after a little warm-up and time to work out some frustration. My friend Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC stepped up and passed in six shots, cold on demand. That is pretty darn good shooting on those targets. The classroom presentations including developing a plan to deal with the immediate aftermath and the handgun retention/disarming techniques are a key piece of John’s POI and I am glad he had time to fit them into our course.

I strongly recommend that you attend a DTI course when John and Vicki are in your area, and if you are shooting 9mm, make sure to bring 147gr FMJ or some +P, they spin those diabolical Ravelin Group Rotators® quite well.

You can find the Defense Training International course schedule located in the hyperlink below.

http://defense-training.com/schedule/

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(Photo: DTI Staff Instructors and Students – Advanced Defensive Handgun Course/DTI Instructor Course; November 17th – 19th, 2017)

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Prepare yourself for the legal aftermath! Comparing legal plans for situations involving the use of deadly force or the threatened use of force.

While teaching courses all across the country I am often asked by my students about the different plans available for protection in the aftermath of a self-defense incident where the use of force including the use of deadly force has taken place.

Protecting yourself against the aftermath is a huge business these days and it all started in 2008 with Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network, they are the oldest and most respected organization in this market.

This information below was gathered from the websites of these providers and from my personal knowledge as a member of two of the companies, and it is verified current as of 10/16/2017.

Self Defense Plan Comparisons

There are many intangibles that need to be factored into your decision, and your decision should NOT be based on cost or blind allegiance to one organization.

The Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network has an Advisory Board consisting of industry giants Massad Ayoob of Massad Ayoob Group, John Farnam of Defense Training International, Tom Givens of Rangemaster Firearms Training Services, Attorney’s Emanuel Kapelsohn and Jim Fleming and Dennis Tueller best known for the “Tueller Principle” and the article he wrote in SWAT Magazine in 1983 named, “How close is too close?” You cannot buy that kind of expert witness team who will be on the ground helping your defense team immediately after your call, none of the other providers have these folks available on a moments notice.

CCW Safe bail bond coverage to $100,000.00 is huge, since most bonds can be well in excess of that amount, and their no limit to coverage for Attorney’s fees for both Criminal and Civil Defense is only matched by US/Texas Law Shield.

As you see from my spreadsheet above, most of the plans have liability limits and remember that certain things like paying for discovery documents may or may not be covered, in the State of Florida vs. Zimmerman case, discovery costs were in excess of $300,000.00, do you have that in savings or investments that you can access?

Again, buyer beware and know exactly what you are buying with these agreements. NRA Carry Guard is a reimbursement program, that means you come up with all the money upfront, they are the only reimbursement program in the industry.

IMPORTANT NOTE: If you are a sworn Law Enforcement Officer and want coverage on and off duty, you need to look at CCW Safe or US/Texas Law Shield, they are the only providers who have plans that cover sworn Law Enforcement Officers.

In fact, it should be noted that USCCA has told sworn Law Enforcement Officers that their department will cover them when they are sued as a result of an on-duty incident, this is a patently false statement.

The moral of the story is simple. Do some in-depth research on each plan, then and only then can you make an informed decision to protect yourself in the aftermath of a significant emotional event like having to use deadly force to save your life or the life of your loved ones.

So, if you are not a multi-millionaire and can fund your own defense, you might want to compare some of the legal protection plans, be it an insurance backed plan, a legal services plan or a membership backed plan.

Find out more by clicking on the links below.

Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network

CCW Safe

Conifer Insurance CCW Advantage

NRA Carry Guard

Second Call Defense

USCCA

US/Texas Law Shield

In full disclosure, I will not recommend one program over another, as I do not know your financial position. I have said it several times, you need to do your own due diligence. I am a member of the Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network and I am also a member of CCW Safe, after doing my own research years ago I found these two programs offer exactly what I want and more importantly, what I need.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: Training with a Legend! Ken Hackathorn Advanced Pistol Course; October 7th & 8th, 2017 – Los Angeles, California (Host: Aztec Training Services)

Back in late April, I spent some time with industry giant Ken Hackathorn at the NRA Annual Meetings in Atlanta and during our conversation I asked him if I could get in a course he was teaching in Couer d’Alene, Idaho in June. Ken said, “no way, the course was way oversold by the hosts” and we both said, “See you at Burro Canyon.”

Fast forward to last weekend. In between visiting family that I don’t get to see very often and meeting with some television executives about providing technical advice to them on firearms and empty hand skills for their network actors and actresses, I attended Ken’s Advanced Pistol course at Burro Canyon Shooting Park high up in the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument.

On Saturday morning I woke up early because my body clock was still on Eastern Daylight Time, three hours ahead of the local time and because I might have been just a little excited to train with a man so well respected in the firearms training industry that everyone should do their best to get in one of his last courses before he retires full-time. So, shortly after sunrise, I found myself driving up to the range so I could be ready to learn from a man who has been on my list to train with for years.

Burro Canyon Shooting Park has nineteen bays ranging from forty-five yards to just under one-hundred ten yards in length.

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(The photo above is courtesy of the Burro Canyon Shooting Park website.)

At 0900hrs we started with Ken greeting all twenty of us and holding a short classroom session on the range before we got down to business running our handguns.

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(The photo above is of Ken giving a short classroom presentation at the back of the range on TD1.)

During the classroom presentation, Ken spoke with us about how he has been a “Student of Weaponcraft” all of his adult life. He said that current training is in decline right now due to oversaturation, and I agree. Unfortunately, a significant percentage of the firearms training community have no business instructing anything at all, they either have untested POI (Program of Instruction) or they cannot explain why they teach what they teach and how it applies to the responsibly armed citizen. Sadly, many of them cannot figure out the adult learning theorem either. These same folks are the ones that get into arguments to raise their social media status and are desperate to sell tickets to Gun School.

Ken started instructing after meeting United States Marine Corps Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper at a course he was teaching in Colorado a few years before the Colonel started the American Pistol Institute, you would recognize that institution now as Gunsite Academy. The story of how Ken got in that course was excellent and you will need to attend a course with Ken in order to get that story from the man himself.

By happenstance, United States Army LTC Robert K. Brown publisher of Soldier of Fortune magazine was also attending that same course in Colorado back in the early 1970’s and a short time after the course Colonel Brown offered Ken the opportunity to become a regular contributor to the magazine, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Just so you know, Ken is very serious about retirement. Yeah, many people have heard him say that he is retiring over the past several years; however, this year he conducted four courses and next year it will be only two and only one is open enrollment. So, fair warning to you, I suggest that if you want to train with Ken you had better find a way to get in that one open enrollment course. (There are hints all over this blog postings with links to the course registration) Ken told us that he has goals in life to see some things like Yosemite, and the Cody Museum and one can’t blame him, for Ken has been training members of the United States Special Operations community, sworn Law Enforcement Officers and of course responsibly armed citizens for over forty-three years, he’s due a break.

Once we were on the range Ken started us with a drill shooting five shots at the “A” zone of an IDPA target from the ready position of our choice. Ever the evaluator and coach, Ken doesn’t miss anything on the range and he is constantly coaching his students. He is well prepared and has a course of fire planned out in his head, I never once saw him refer to any notes, this kind of experience is what you pay for when you attend a course with an industry giant like Ken Hackathorn who was one of the founding members of both I.P.S.C. and I.D.P.A.

Over the two-day course I never once heard him “undress” a student for not doing things his way as you see with some of the “traveling road show instructors” these days. Ken showed us techniques that he has perfected over his career as a sworn Law Enforcement Officer and as an industry expert; however, while we were shooting his drills he left it up to us to us to figure out what techniques we were comfortable with.

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(The photo above is typical of the weekend, Ken on his way to give some personal coaching to one of the students on TD1.)

We were constantly evaluated by the timer and by our target. Ken’s scoring system is based on time measurements, and you must add time for misses outside the designated target area for the drill. There are two things don’t lie in the shooting world, the timer and your target.

Speaking of that, Ken told us a few stories about how some top level shooters and even some regular Joe’s would boast in his courses how they can run certain drills and score times that are absolutely over the top ridiculous. Ken said that he used to tell them, “Well, today I am from Missouri, and you’ve got to show me.” More often than not these folks would make excuses and or embarrass themselves by not being able to perform as they said they could just minutes before.

Many of the drills we shot over this two-day course are drills that you have heard of, e.g., the Bill Drill, the El Presidente’ and countless others. What made this educational was the fact that we shot just about all the drills individually on the timer in front of everyone else, talk about pressure to perform, that was some kind of pressure. We then evaluated our targets, pasting our bad memories and adding up our scores using Ken’s scoring method.

Ken’s 20-second pass/fail par time.

A = 11 seconds and under
B = 11.1 seconds to 14 seconds
C = 14.1 seconds to 17 seconds
D = 17.1 seconds to 19.9 seconds
20 seconds and above identifies the shooter as someone who needs a little more personal coaching.

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(The photo above is of Ken demonstrating his slide-lock or empty-gun reload technique on TD1.)

My scores over the weekend were consistently in the B/C range, as with everything when you apply yourself and focus on what’s important now at Gun School, you can do well. Once again, attending a course of this caliber helped me identify some things that I can work on to increase my skill level and also gave me a lot of things that I can pass on to the students that I train as well.

During the two-day course, Ken taught to the adult learning theorem of explaining, demonstrating, and then coaching students through his drills each and every time, and as I have said many times before, this style of teaching works really well for me as both a trainer and of course as a student.

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(The photo above is of Ken using his own personal Wilson Combat Lightweight Commander to demonstrate his “Strong Hand Only” shooting technique.)

My gun of choice for the course was my SIG SAUER P320 X-Carry, using a Comp-Tac OWB holster. I ordered one thousand rounds of Remington UMC 115gr FMJ ammunition from LAX Ammo and had it delivered directly to my hotel. The ammunition and the gun ran flawlessly; however, I did have a small hiccup with my X-Carry when some sand and dirt got in it from putting it on the ground to run the weak hand only shooting drills. The “Lightening Cut” in the top of the slide is certainly cool looking, but if you get any dirt inside the action, bank on it creating stoppages in the cycle of operation.

Additionally, I ran all the drills in the two-day course from concealment as did one or two other students who were from counties where the Sheriff will issue a California License to Carry.

Ken Range 1

(The photo above is courtesy of Aztec Training Services.)

Speaking of Aztec Training Services, Chen and Andrew did a great job as hosts. You may know that when Alias Training & Security Services “closed it’s doors” Aztec was formed almost overnight and they either represent or host some of the biggest names in the firearms training industry, e.g., Ken Hackathorn, Larry Vickers, Jeff Gonzales, Buck Doyle, Daryl Holland and Matt Graham. Quite frankly, I wouldn’t have been in this course without being able to speak with Ken at the NRA Annual Meetings, but Aztec Training Services played a significant role by always being there to answer questions for an out of town traveler like me. Check out their website and course schedule in the various links I have placed in this posting.

In summary, this course is all about building your skills as a combative shooter. If you apply yourself and take good notes you will take away a lot of information that you can use in your personal range training sessions when you get back home. Again I encourage you to get in Ken’s open enrollment course next year if you want to train with him before he fully retires from teaching.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Photo Disclosure: Featured photo courtesy of Aztec Training Services.

Fourth Quarter 2017; Trigger Control Dot Org Training Schedule!

Hello Everyone! Because many of the courses that I teach are closed enrollment they are never announced anywhere. Regardless, many people have been asking for a listing of courses available for the responsibly armed citizen instructor and student and the ones I am attending as a student as well. This is a complete list of my upcoming training schedule for the months of October-November-December 2017. I foresee no changes to this schedule at the present time, plane tickets have been purchased, and both hotel and rental car reservations have been made as well.

October 4th (Wednesday) – Defensive Tactics Handgun Retention/Disarming Techniques (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): Orlando, Florida.

October 7th & 8th (Saturday/Sunday)Ken Hackathorn (Aztec Training Services) Two-Day Advanced Pistol Course: Burro Canyon Shooting Park; Azusa, California.

October 10th thru 13th (Tuesday thru Friday) – 9th Annual High Liability Instructor Training Seminar: Tallahassee Community College; Havana, Florida.

October 14th (Saturday) – NRA Instructor Basics of Personal Protection In the Home Course: Clearwater, Florida.

October 15th (Sunday) – NRA Refuse to be a Victim Instructor Development Workshop: Clearwater, Florida.

October 16th & 17th (Monday/Tuesday) – Simunitions Reality-Based Scenario Training for Law Enforcement (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): South Florida.

October 21st (Saturday) – Handgun Essentials & Defensive Tactics for the Responsibly Armed Citizen Course: Nicolet Rifle Club; Suamico, Wisconsin.

October 23rd & 24th (Monday/Tuesday)SIG SAUER Academy; Epping, New Hampshire.

October 27th, 28th & 29th (Friday thru Sunday) – NRA Personal Protection Outside the Home Student and Instructor Courses: Clearwater & Lakeland, Florida.

October 30th & 31st (Monday/Tuesday) – Vehicle Dynamics Course Days 3 & 4 (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): North Central Florida.

November 4th & 5th (Saturday/Sunday) – NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting – Instructor Led Training and NRA Instructor Pistol Shooting Course: Clearwater, Florida.

November 7th & 8th (Tuesday/Wednesday) – Two-Day Vehicle Dynamics Course (Closed Enrollment, LEO Only): Tampa Bay Area, Florida.

November 11th & 12th (Saturday/Sunday)Rangemaster – Instructor Reunion Conference: BDC Gun Room; Shawnee, Oklahoma.

November 14th thru 20th (Tuesday thru Monday) – Closed Enrollment Course(s): Kentucky & Ohio.

December 1st & 2nd (Friday/Saturday) – USCCA Instructor Development Workshop: Clearwater, Florida.

December 4th thru 6th (Monday thru Wednesday) – NRA Practical Pistol Coach School: National Rifle Association Headquarters; Fairfax, Virginia.

December 9th & 10th (Saturday/Sunday) – NRA Rifle & Shotgun Instructor Course(s): Lakeland, Florida.

December 16th & 17th (Saturday/Sunday) – Pat McNamara TMACS, INC T.A.P.S. Sentinal Course: Panteao Productions Studios Facility; Swansea, South Carolina.

December 18th thru January 4th – Holiday vacation, no courses scheduled.

Please message me via www.facebook.com/triggercontrol for more information if you are interested in attending any of the open enrollment courses offered.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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My 2017-2018 Personal Training Calendar

As we move solidly into the third quarter of 2017, I thought that it would be good to take a moment to reflect on where I have been, and where I am going throughout the rest of the 2017 and into the first quarter of 2018.

My 2017 training year started after the passing of my Great Aunt Doris, she was one of the strongest human beings that I have ever known. I took care of her as Trustee, Healthcare Surrogate, and Personal Representative watching out for her well-being for over six years, and it was very difficult to lose her because she taught me so much about life, unconditional love and the true meaning of family. Just before she was called home, and while she was in a very advanced stage of Alzheimer’s disease she had a moment of clarity while we were talking and said, “go out and get it.” (I am paraphrasing slightly because the context of our conversation was about something a little different than firearms and self-defense training) When she passed away in the early hours of St. Patrick’s Day I was by her side and held her hand as she took her final breath. In the days following I thought that the best thing I can do to honor her memory is to follow her advice to “go out and get it.” So, I have embarked on a training schedule that many people would envy.

A significant percentage of these training courses are skill builder type courses and not instructor courses. I use these type of courses to identify gaps in my skills that lead me back to the range to diligently practice. Every once in a while, we all get into a training rut and work on drills that we perceive ourselves to be good at. I try to work on a different skill set each week when I visit the range. Oh by the way, I typically visit the range twice a week and shoot 150-250 rounds per session. This schedule works well for me and keeps me sharp, if I didn’t do it, all I would be able to do is shoot demos in the courses that I teach. Typically I find things that can always be improved upon, and that is why I use a lot of dry-fire in between my range sessions.

When I started my personal training year it was with Tom and Lynn Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services in their two-day Combative Pistol course on April 1st & 2nd in Okeechobee, Florida at the OK Corral Gun Club. Tom and Lynn are excellent trainers and even better people. I chose this particular course because I knew that it would allow me to get back in the groove so to speak. Their two-day Combative Pistol course is an absolute must take for the responsibly armed citizen, and I will be hosting this course at Tall Palm Ranch, a private range facility in Lakeland, Florida on April 7th & 8th, 2018. I have posted a course review on this course here in this blog for you to read.

A couple weeks later, on the day before Easter I attended Assault Counter Tactics – Vehicle Counter Ambush course at the American Police Hall of Fame in Titusville, Florida. Paul Pawela, Director of Law Enforcement Training at the hall of fame was the chief instructor, and he held this course as a tribute to United States Army Colonel (R) Danny R. McKnight, former Commander of the 3rd Ranger Battalion and the Commander on the ground in Mogadishu, Somalia in 1993 during operation Gothic Serpent. There is a full course review in this blog for you to read.

At the end of April, I attended the NRA Annual Meetings in Atlanta and volunteered some time as a firearms examiner on Thursday afternoon and Friday morning. My good friend Dave flew down Minnesota to hang out with me for the weekend, the trip was great, I always enjoy attending the NRAAM. I also got to spend a little time with my friend Santi from South Florida who was in town on business, I took him to the airport when I picked up Dave from Minnesota. Thankfully I was also able to spend a little time with friends Marty and Gila Hayes from Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network and Firearms Academy of Seattle. I always enjoy learning from Marty, he and Gila are titans in the firearms training industry, and if you have a chance you should go out and train with them in beautiful Onalaska, Washington. Again, there is a blog posting of my experiences at the #NRAAM right here for you to read.

On May 9th & 10th I attended the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course given at GLOCK Sport Shooting Foundation Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia. The course and the instructor is not one that I would recommend to anyone, and as of this writing they still have not reached out to invite me back. (Not Surprising) Seriously, the course was absolutely horrible and I have no reservations about saying so. Maybe they are working on fixing things with the course of fire and the instructor has hopefully checked his ego, who knows, but this course and this instructor is not one I would ever recommend. I do know that about two weeks ago GLOCK invited a group of people to the course, one of which I know is a writer so maybe they are making an attempt to right the ship; however, that does not make up for all the money and time I spent traveling to and taking a course that was advertised as 1,000 round CoF when I only shot 375 rounds and missed out on a significant portion of the curriculum because of the instructor and his huge ego. I would hope one day that GLOCK – GSSF would step-up and invite me back at no expense to see the course again and if they have made the necessary improvements because myself and the others who actually came out of pocket for the course I attended did not get full value. You guessed it, there is a course review of my experiences at the GLOCK Operator Course here in this blog.

Next up was my third trip in four weeks to North Georgia. This time it was for another course with Tom and Lynn Givens, I took the Rangemaster Firearms Training Services three-day Combative Pistol/Vehicle Defense course. This course was hosted by Chief Deputy Lee Weems with the Oconee County Sheriff’s Office in Watkinsville, Georgia. “The Chief” is a top notch lawman, highly accomplished shooter and an excellent instructor. On day two of the course we were joined by Claude Werner, The Tactical Professor, I was honored to meet Claude and had him in one of my courses over Father’s Day weekend here in Florida. Follow his blog by clicking on this link, tactical professor. The Rangemaster Combative Pistol/Vehicle Defense Course was excellent! Tom teaches to the adult learning theorems of hear, see, do and test, that works for a lot of people, especially me. As mentioned above, I will be hosting Tom, Lynn and hopefully their “Chinrens” (Skeeter, Dexter and Stub) in 2018. Once for the two-day Combative Pistol Course in April and then for the Three-Day Defensive Shotgun Instructor Development Course in November at Tall Palm Ranch, in Lakeland, Florida. Make sure to keep an eye on the events page at Trigger Control Dot Org. As for a course review on this course, it is on it’s way. I have not posted one yet because I wrote an article about this course for a publication, unfortunately I don’t believe that the article is going to be published, so look for a full course review very soon on this blog.

In mid June I traveled to Titusville, Florida for three days to train with General Dynamics Simunitions in their Instructor and Safety Certification Course. Which reminds me to email them and ask for the new Instructor manual that they promised us. The course was excellent, and the instructors did a great job moving over thirty of us through several reality based training scenarios and then they coached us as we ran our own reality based training scenarios in an abandoned office building just up the street from the the host agency, the Titusville Police Department. I highly recommend the course, and once again I will post a full course review as the article I was writing for this course looks like it has been quashed as well.

Personal Note: I am right now working on a contract with a publisher, there will be an announcement about this soon here and on my other social media venues.

In late June I made a trip to SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire. The SIG SAUER Master Pistol Instructor course was great, and my Instructor Steven Gilcreast was excellent. I enjoyed my time in New Hampshire so much that I am heading back this coming Sunday in order to take three more courses next week. I can give no more positive endorsement than signing up and paying for more courses at SIG SAUER Academy. A full course review for the SIG SAUER Academy Master Pistol Instructor course was posted in this blog.

July is usually my vacation month to get things together for the courses I will instruct and also attend, along with the goals I want to accomplish throughout the rest of the year. At this time I also plan my training schedule for the following calendar year and make sure I have things on the books with range facilities and local hosts. However, during the month of July I did teach a couple courses and ended up taking the Tactical Combat Casualty Care Course given by On Point Safety & Defense at my home club, the Wyoming Antelope Club in Clearwater, Florida. Franklin did a great job with the POI for this course, it is one that I highly recommend for both the firearms instructor and the responsibly armed citizen. I will be hosting this as a closed enrollment course on Saturday October 14th at the Wyoming Antelope Club for my cadre with Trigger Control Dot Org, we may open up the enrollment in a couple weeks as I want to make sure to fill the course for Franklin because he is an excellent trainer.

Which brings us up to present day. Currently I am packing for my return trip to SIG SAUER Academy this Sunday. Once again I am looking forward to the time I will spend in the greater Epping/Exeter metropolitan area. Additionally I may find the time to drive down to Boston to take in a Red Sox game at Fenway Park, a bucket list item that you can be sure I will check off. Stay tuned for course reviews on the three courses that I will attend next week.

The last weekend in August I will be in Culpeper, Virginia attending a third course with Rangemaster Firearms Training Services, I will be attending the Advanced Instructor Development Course for a second time. I first graduated from this course back in March 2015 in Fort Lauderdale, and candidly, I am looking forward to seeing how Tom has evolved the curriculum of this course. I posted a course review on the original course in 2015 as the first entry in this blog, a new course review will be posted once I complete this course later this month, so please stay tuned!

In September I will be instructing and attending a couple closed enrollment courses for Law Enforcement and one NRA Instructor Pistol Shooting course, then I will be attending a course with Dave Spaulding from Handgun Combatives. I have been chasing Dave for a few years now and the opportunity presented itself, so I jumped on it. By the way, I am very glad that I took action when I did, when I paid my course tuition he only had six registrations, four days later the course was completely sold out. In fact it is oversold to the point that he had to bring in another instructor. Let that be a lesson to those who procrastinate in signing up for courses. Again, a full course review will be posted in this blog.

At the end of September I have been invited to attend a closed enrollment course with a training group that is offering a Combat Shotgun and Advanced Pistol course. Unfortunately this course is being held in one of those states that do not welcome me and my gun, fortunately I will be training with a bunch of operators who can protect me. (Wink-Wink) These two courses will allow me some more flexibility in offering closed enrollment curriculum for both Law Enforcement and Military units.

In early October I will be traveling to Los Angeles to do some consulting with a major television network at one of their studios. The contract is in hand, the money is in the bank, now I just have to work with some actors and actresses on gun handling and some self-defense skills. I know, it’s a tough job, but someone has to do it, right? Oh and yet again, I am traveling somewhere that I am not typically welcome with my handgun; however, it pays to have friends in high places.

At the end of my trip to California I will attend Ken Hackathorn‘s two-day Advanced Pistol course at Burro Canyon Shooting Park in the San Gabriel Mountains, high above the smog of Los Angeles. I am really looking forward to training with Ken, he has been training Law Enforcement Officers, the United States Military and Responsibly Armed Americans in the responsible and ethical use of firearms for somewhere close to 50 years. You can bet that I will be taking copious notes. When I met Ken at the NRA Annual Meetings in Atlanta he told me that he will retire from actively teaching this year and that trainers like Larry Vickers and Daryl Holland both with Aztec Training Services will be taking over a lot of his training. As you might suspect, a full course review will be published in this blog.

The third weekend in October I will be in Green Bay, Wisconsin being hosted by The Well Armed Woman’s oldest chapter. The ladies and their local gun club have been very accommodating and I can’t tell you how excited I am to bring a one-day handgun and personal tactics course for the responsibly armed citizen to “Cheeseville.” I will have a few friends of mine helping me with the course and I am sure that my host and some of the students will be posting course reviews, I will share them as they are published.

The month of November will be very busy as well. During the first three weekends I will be driving to North Carolina, flying to Oklahoma and then flying to the Midwest to take courses in between several course commitments of my own as a trainer. One of these trips includes the first Rangemaster Instructor Reunion Conference to be held at the BDC Gun Room in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Tom and Lynn Givens scheduled this gathering for their alumni and it sold out very quickly, then Tom asked for a larger meeting space in the facility to accommodate more folks and now it is nearly sold out again. This will be a great trip, and one that I am sure will be memorable.

In December I will be headed to South Carolina to conduct a closed enrollment course and to attend a weekend course near Columbia. I am excited to take a drive around Fort Jackson where tomorrow (August 11th) it will be 35 years since I set foot on the soil, err sand there, more appropriately I pushed sand in the front lean and rest position doing push-ups while getting eaten by gnats on Tank Hill, “Bravo Four One” B-4-1, 4th Platoon, “Keep up the Fire!”

In January 2018 I will be headed back to Oklahoma to train with Tom Givens, William Aprill and Craig “Southnarc” Douglas in Establishing a Dominance Paradigm, and then on to the NSSF SHOT Show in Las Vegas. I will be hosting Patrick McNamara here in Florida for his T.A.P.S. Carbine course at the end of the month, I believe this will be his first course in the “GunShine” state. (That’s Florida for all you Yankees) I am excited about hosting Mac, he is one of the very best trainers across all firearms disciplines and a high quality individual as well. Trigger Control Dot Org will be handling the pre-registration for this course, so please stay tuned to the events page on Trigger Control Dot Org for a course announcement soon!

The weekend after the Super Bowl is going to be absolutely epic! I am hosting Gabe White for his very first course in the GunShine State. Gabe is the only man to ever score a perfect 125/125 on “The Test” at the elite Rogers Shooting School in Elijay, Georgia, and get this, he did it from concealment (AIWB) with his GLOCK 34. Both Tom and Lynn Givens and myself sold out Gabe’s course in short order with folks that we knew and have trained with before, so to be fair to everyone who missed out, I am bringing Gabe back in late September 2018 for another course at Tall Palm Ranch in Lakeland, Florida. Registration is open for the September 29th & 30th, 2018 course on Gabe’s Eventbrite page.

In March I will attend the 20th annual Rangemaster Firearms Training Services Tactical Conference at the Direct Action Resource Center in North Little Rock, Arkansas. The Tactical Conference has trainers from all across the country, people like John Farnam, Massad Ayoob, Marty Hayes, Chick Haggard, Claude Werner, of course Tom Givens and many more nationally known trainers. TACCON sells out way ahead of time and if you have not already registered you’ve got maybe a few weeks until it will be sold out. Register and pay your event fee now on Eventbrite or by mail by downloading the form in this link.

As mentioned several times above, on April 7th & 8th, 2018 I will be hosting Tom and Lynn Givens for their Rangemaster two-day Combative Pistol course. This will be a “Home Course” for them teaching at Tall Palm Ranch, in Lakeland, Florida. This course should fill up very quickly with my instructor cadre and students here in the Tampa Bay area, that is why I am hosting it, all for their benefit. You can register on Eventbrite or by sending your check or money order to; Rangemaster Firearms Training Services, 1808 James L. Redman Parkway, Plant City, Florida 33563.

There will be more courses to teach and more to attend in 2018; however, this is what I have going through the first quarter of 2018, how about you? Do you run your gun, or just run your mouth through your keyboard on social media about how you supposedly run your gun? (Sadly a lot of people do just that and they think they are experts in firearms training and the justifiable use of force)

I’ll leave you with this last thought … There are people in the world who watch things happen, then there are the people who make things happen and lastly there are people who wonder what happened. Get off your butt, schedule some training and make things happen!

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

Course Review: GLOCK Operator Course May 9th-10th, 2017 – Smyrna, Georgia

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(Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

On May 9th and 10th I attended the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course held at GLOCK Training – Glock Sport Shooting Foundation Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia.

Eligibility requirements for all open enrollment GLOCK Operator courses are as follows: Active or Reserve Law Enforcement, Active or Reserve Military, Licensed Armed Security Officers, current GSSF Members and current NRA Certified Firearms Instructors. These eligibility requirements can be found here, with additional course information, to include the course outline and expected round count can be found in this PDF.

As I mentioned above, this was GLOCK’s initial open enrollment offering, the first course was a closed course for Law Enforcement Officers only. The students were from many different walks of life. There were four members of the media invited to attend the course by GLOCK’s Media Department including some really big names in gun writing and one other writer who showed up and paid the full course tuition of $300.00. There were five regular Joe’s, all of whom paid the same $300.00 tuition as well. The regular Joe’s were as follows: Two (2) sworn Law Enforcement Officer’s, one (1) United States Army Reserve Captain and GSSF member from North Georgia, a Country Club Manager and GSSF member from North Carolina and of course, yours truly. Additionally there were also three (3) full-time GLOCK employees in attendance as well.

The GLOCK Pistols in attendance consisted mostly of 9mm models, 17’s, 19’s & 34’s, and one GLOCK 40, 10mm long-slide. Personally, I have never seen a student bring a 10mm to a course like this; however, the brave young man who did should be commended, he did very well considering he had a gun with tremendous impulse during the recoil cycle.

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(GLOCK 40, 10mm – Photo Courtesy of Andre’ M. Dall’au)

Our Instructor for the two-day course was Joseph “Willie” Parent, III; Director of Training and GSSF for GLOCK, Inc., Willie is a seventeen (17) year veteran of the United States Marine Corps, and he let you know it with his rigid military bearing, serious demeanor and of course the vernacular he used on the range.

Willie used the term “event driven” many times in a short period of time to describe the course along with explaining that this course was a collaboration of several GLOCK Staff Instructors. He went on to say that they developed this course to help people who own GLOCK platform pistols operate them more efficiently and of course, effectively.

It is worthy to note that it was mentioned more than once that “GLOCK Training doesn’t sell excitement.” From taking this course I can assure you that is a true statement. Nothing about the presentation of this curriculum was exciting. (More on this later)

The round count for this course was advertised at 1,000 and GLOCK company policy is that each student bring only factory ammunition, no hand-loads are allowed in any GLOCK Training course. As someone who has attended a lot of high-volume round count courses, I have learned to give a twenty to twenty-five percent (20%-25%) buffer +/- on the advertised round count, and that estimate has been pretty darned accurate for years. I find that more often than not I have shot less than advertised number. My exact round count for this course was 375 rounds. TD1 round count was 135, TD2 was 240 including the 22 round GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards Test.

Now, I have never been in a course where the round count is 62.5% less than advertised; however, I have seen these things happen to others, and the reason is typically a lack of course content, unfortunately that was not the case here. There was plenty of course content that we didn’t even get to experience, e.g., low-light/no-light techniques and alternate shooting positions. Sadly, our course was shorted, that is the bottom line and you will understand how as you read further.

(Important Note: As a mentor I don’t see it my place to publicly shame someone on social media or on my blog that is read by literally tens of thousands of people, but our job is to never forget the first rule in teaching something; deliver all of the advertised curriculum to your paid students, no matter if your course is “event driven” or not, and do so in a way that minimizes you and your accomplishments and maximizes the curriculum and of course participant involvement. This will allow you to hit the adult learning theorem of hear, see and do in each block of instruction. The student who paid the full tuition will be grateful if you just remember that one simple thing.)

TD1 started in the classroom with a safety briefing that was a combination of Colonel Jeff Cooper’s four universal rules of gun safety and the NRA’s three rules of gun safety. (I really wish Instructors would pick one or the other and not both, and never make them your own by changing the words, it doesn’t add anything to them, in fact it takes away from them) At this time we also received an overview of the GLOCK pistols and their functionality.

The National Sales Manager and Assistant National Sales Manager brought the GLOCK summer releases down from “The Mothership” for us to see. These included the GLOCK 17L Gen 3 and GLOCK 24 Gen 3, both with their 6.02″ barrels, the GLOCK FDE frames and of course the GLOCK 17C & 19C Gen 4 guns. You may not be able to see them in the photos below; however, GLOCK is now offering guns with forward cocking serrations near the muzzle on their guns, that is something new this summer.

Once the classroom presentation was complete, we headed to the indoor range just a few steps away and through a set of double doors. Once inside we made sure our guns were clear and started with dry-fire presentations from the holster (Open Carry) at fifteen (15) yards while in an “interview position.” This position is similar to the position that a Law Enforcement Officer might use when speaking to someone just outside of arms length. Our Instructor taught what I call the “press out” presentation or the upside-down “L” and not the index presentation.

Once we were done with dry-fire presentations, we were then taught how to properly load a GLOCK pistol. This exercise was done by Instructor demonstration only, there was no student involvement in this exercise which surprised me because that goes against the adult learning theorem of hear, see and do. Besides, we were all instructed by the course outline to bring ten (10) dummy rounds each, this would have been a great opportunity to use them.

We then started on the course of fire standing on the fifteen (15) yard line shooting ten rounds slow-fire. The Instructors command of “Shooter Ready, Target” was our queue to present our pistol and fire. The target used was an NRA B-8 target. (See Below) We repeated this exercise three times alternating relays and pasting all misses that hit outside of the nine ring.

I had recently installed a new set of Ameriglo I-Dot sights (GL-301) on my GLOCK 19C Gen 3, and I needed to get used to the proper sight picture at fifteen (15) yards. In my first go around I had only three of ten hits inside the nine ring; however, after I made a slight adjustment in sight picture my group was spot on. (Pardon the pun) After we completed this drill, we took a lunch break for an hour.

AAA NRA B-8 Target
(The NRA B-8 Target)

If you attend this course at GLOCK Training/GSSF Headquarters in Smyrna, there are several small local restaurants close by; however, I suggest that you bring a cooler if you are driving and eat your lunch there in the classroom, that way you are not rushed going somewhere to eat and then making it back on time afterwards.

We reconvened in the range after lunch we started shooting pairs at fifteen (15) yards, again starting in the interview position and upon command. I found this very weird as there was really no reason to be “banging pairs” from fifteen yards away, this does nothing for marksmanship fundamentals or allows an diagnostics to take place; however, after shooting three iterations of pairs we then started working on slide-lock, empty-gun or emergency reloads depending on the terminology that you use.

Willie showed us four of the six ways Instructors teach their students to send the slide into battery after a reload and emphasized that the power-stroke was the way we should be doing it with the GLOCK platform pistol. (The power-stroke has the shooter cupping the support hand over the rear of slide and pulling it back using the thumb and fingers on the cocking serrations on the rear of the slide so the recoil spring assembly or RSA for short is fully compressed before you release it. Provided you have a good RSA, this action creates maximum inertia in launching the slide forward into battery)

Next we performed the one shot, slide-lock reload, and one shot drill working on perfect technique. This is a very good drill and one I use on a regular basis to improve my reload speeds.

Next we started shooting silhouette targets while preforming what Willie called, “immediate and remedial action” drills. These terms are nothing more than military jargon for clearing common stoppages and malfunctions, e.g., failure to fire, failure to eject, failure to extract etc…

Next we worked on failure to stop, or the Mozambique drill from the seven (7) yard line and we ran though this three times per relay. The Mozambique drill is two shots to the chest and one to the head performed from the holster or a ready position, we performed it from the holster. Once we finished this drill, TD1 was in the books.

It is also worthy to note that all drills were performed from either a low-ready or from open carry on TD1, there was no option to work from concealment, even for an experienced student.

TD2 started with a good breakfast at the Holiday Inn Express Atlanta Galleria area and upon checkout I was given a one-day credit on my bill because our room was not serviced for us while we were training the day prior. That was nice of the hotel management to offer and do that for me, after all I am an IHG member.

TD2 of the GLOCK Operator Course started in the classroom with a review of the safety rules from TD1 and then we headed into the range and started with a drill that is designed to help the student with trigger control. Candidly, this drill should have been the first drill after dry-fire presentations on TD1; however, it wasn’t me that wrote the course of fire and I was there to learn, it just seemed awful strange doing a drill that is used to teach the shooter about trigger control when we had already shot 135 rounds on TD1.

We then proceeded to shoot this drill from three, five and seven yards on an NRA B-8 target. During the first iteration we were instructed to pin the trigger to the rear and then let it reset after our sights were back on target. Firearms training industry titan John Farnam calls this, “catching the link.” In the second iteration we would go through resetting the trigger under the impulse of recoil, and in the third iteration we were to speed reset the trigger while firing pairs. I found this drill to be of little value as I do not nor would I ever teach pining the trigger to the rear and catching the link as you ride the reset forward.

Catching the link can have disastrous results if not done properly and with a loss of fine motor skills that will occur under stress this might just cause you to freeze when resetting the trigger, I have seen it too many times with Law Enforcement Officers being taught the fundamentals of trigger control improperly and because they pin the trigger to the rear they lose time on their qualifications, not to mention what might happen if they are in a gunfight with a hardened criminal who does not see handcuffs in his or her future.

We then performed this same drill at ten (10), twelve and a half (12.5) and fifteen (15) yards, only this time we were shooting a silhouette target center chest. Again, there is no value in doing this at distance, there are much better drills to help the student understand proper trigger control and cadence. With the experienced shooters we had in this course this drill could have been easily done in one or two iterations from three or five yards, yet we wasted time doing this out to fifteen (15) yards. Again, this drill is a TD1 drill in any course I have ever been to, but not the GLOCK Operator Course.

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The flames you see are the burning gases exiting the ports in the barrel of my GLOCK 19C Gen 3 as I shoot a drill at the first ever open enrollment GLOCK Operator Course in Smyrna, Georgia on May 9th & 10th, 2017. (Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

After a short break we came back to find the NRA B-8 targets back up again and the next drill was the ball and dummy drill. Again, this is a drill that should have been done on TD1, not TD2.

In this drill we gave a fellow student a couple magazines and shot this drill at the twenty-five (25) yard line. This is way too far away from the target for this drill. Each iteration was from the holster, presenting the pistol and firing one shot. If we were on a dummy round and we caused the sights to deviate, we were supposed to tell our coach (Fellow Student) what we did wrong. The Instructor told us that saying “I anticipated” was not acceptable, he’s right about that, not everything is an anticipation or flinch. As shooters, we were to describe exactly what we did to cause the sights deviate off of our intended point of aim.

We then went on to shooting multiple targets with pairs to the high center chest area of a silhouette target from the holster. This drill was done from the seven (7) yard line and we were to change the target that we started with during each iteration. In this drill you must make sure to not “out-drive your headlights” as my mentor Tom Givens says. In case you are wondering, your headlights are your eyes, and to get good hits on the target or threat you are transitioning to you must move your head first and then bring the gun to your eyes and engage the second target or threat. See the example in the photos below.

Engaging multiple targets from the holster. (Photos Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

The next drill we worked on was a box drill. This is where you shoot two rounds to the torso and one round to the head on multiple targets. This drill is basically a failure to stop or Mozambique drill using two targets and taking the two head shots after you engage the second target or threat with a pair to the chest and then transition back to the first target and taking a head shot on that target as well.

After a break we started shooting on the move. First with moving forward from the fifteen (15) yard line all the way to the one (1) yard line while engaging a silhouette target high center chest. When the Instructor demonstrated this drill he was visibly upset with himself when he missed a single shot and even said so in front of the class. As a student I found this to be unprofessional and as an Instructor I was embarrassed for him. Unfortunately this was not an isolated incident, Willie had made this mistake on multiple occasions; however, this time it was pronounced and instead of him using his misses as a teachable moment to explain to the students why he missed the shot, he was down on himself and said out loud that he was worried about the writers making light of this miss in their articles and blogs.

Candidly at this point I had heard about enough and had to chime in, “Let’s focus on the positive here, you shot sixteen or seventeen rounds and missed one, I’d say that is a good hit to miss ratio.” After I said that, several students approached me on lunch break and thanked me for having the courage to say that, because this was beginning to be a common theme and unfortunately that is basically what we were subjected to for two days.

Once each student had run through moving forward on a threat three times we took a lunch break for an hour.

After lunch we worked on moving to the rear from three to seven yards again shooting a silhouette target high center chest. I didn’t mention it before, but the key to any movement drill, no matter the direction you are moving is to press the trigger when you have an acceptable sight picture or sight movie as Gabe White refers to it.

After a short break we were then introduced to shooting on the move left and right at the seven yard line. This technique was new to many of the shooters and some struggled with the footwork associated. Similar to moving rearward we ran through this dry-fire once and live-fire once.

Next we worked on strong hand and support hand only shooting from the ten yard line and then we went dry for nearly two hours working on one handed manipulation drills using our strong hand and weak hand only. Two students showed their techniques to draw the gun from their holsters using the support hand only. These are techniques that I had seen before; however, I tried several different ones until I settled in on the one I have been using for years.

We then worked on more one handed manipulations including clearing malfunctions and reloading the pistol with strong hand and support hand only. The safety protocol was very high with these drills, and thus we only preformed the drills dry-fire with dummy rounds.

After a short break we were introduced to the GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards. This is an evaluation, not a qualification of your skills under the pressure of a shot timer. Due to all the wasted time in the course each student only got one try at the pistol standards test, even though the scoring sheet had room for three separate tests as they refer to them at GLOCK Training. Considering all of the penalties I had my score was a very disappointing Level 1; however, when I returned home, I was able to run the same exact course of fire three times in a row cold, scoring a very respectable Level 3, each time.

Please do not ask me to share the GLOCK Operator Course Pistol Standards with you, it’s not going to happen. One has to protect the integrity of the course so new students don’t try to practice the evaluation standards in preparation of the course.

This will not be a surprise to the instructor as I left many of these comments on my written course review before leaving the building; however, as both a student and fellow instructor I am not sure Willie is the right instructor to deliver this curriculum and I cannot recommend this course to anyone at this time.

As a mentor, I would jump at the opportunity to work with Willie in polishing his presentations and this course of fire so it makes sense, and flows better so the students can see all of it.

Sadly, I could have saved nearly $750.00 in tuition, hotel charges, gas, food the 625 rounds I never fired, not to mention sixteen hours worth of windshield time, had I known this was going to be the result.

As a good friend told me, “Gordon, someone had to be the guinea pig.” If GLOCK Training offered me a seat in the course again I would take it, and maybe I might get a chance to see the entire course of fire and run all the drills; however, after publishing this course review, and even offering to mentor Willie, I don’t see that ever happening, then again surprises do happen.

Oh, nearly a month has passed since the course and I did receive this nice GLOCK Operator PVC Patch in the mail, I will put it with all the other patches I collect and remember what might have been.

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Just remember, as a student you must be willing to pick up the brass on the range, and my good friend Paul caught me doing what I do best with a walnut picker.

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(Photo Courtesy of Paul Pawela)

#GLOCK #GLOCKTraining #GSSF #GlockOperatorCourse

Until next time …

Live life abundantly!

Stay Safe & Train Hard!

Course Review: Assault Counter Tactics; Vehicle Counter Ambush Course, April 15, 2017; Titusville, Florida

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

This past Saturday I attended Paul Pawela’s Assault Counter Tactics, Vehicle Counter Ambush Course in Titusville, Florida at the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum. The course was set up to provide training and to honor United States Army Colonel (R) Danny McKnight, Battalion Commander 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment during the Battle of Mogadishu. The event was sponsored by Nate Love with Frontier Tactical in Brooksville, Florida and Spartan Training Gear.

I arrived at about forty-five minutes early using less than a half tank of gas on the 2.5 hour drive from the Tampa Bay area. When Paul and Linda arrived, I introduced myself and jumped right in to help them unload their equipment.

Before the course started I had the opportunity to walk around the Museum (I had been there once before, but it was after hours) and check out all of the displays including the gun range and their extensive display of patches and badges from law enforcement agencies all across the country. I was impressed by the display of artifacts dedicated to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, and the murder of Dallas Police Officer J.D. Tippit. The American Police Hall of Fame & Museum is a beautiful facility and one you must see if traveling anywhere near Florida’s Space Coast.

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(Photo Credit: Trigger Control Dot Org)

A little after 0900hrs the course started with Paul giving us a safety briefing on the four universal safety rules and to let us know that we must all disarm and make sure that we do not have any firearms and other weapons on our person during our participation at the five stations he had set up for us. After the safety briefing and making sure everyone had filled out a waiver Paul introduced Colonel (R) Danny McKnight.

Colonel McKnight spoke a little about what his role would be in the training and he graciously offered to personalize a copy of his book, Streets of Mogadishu: Leadership at it’s best, political correctness at it’s worst!” Make sure you pick up a copy on his website at: http://dannymcknight.com/bookdvd.htm

The other presenters who spoke before training commenced were Manuel (Manny) Cabrera of Sidekicks Family Martial Arts Center, and E.J. Owens founder of Legally Concealed and author of “Counter Violence; your guide to surviving a deadly encounter.”

The training day consisted of the twenty-two participants being broken down into five small groups to participate in reality-based scenario training on the grounds of the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum.

My first station was a scenario where a responsibly armed citizen drove up on a machete wielding man bludgeoning someone to death. The citizen had to dismount his vehicle (4-Door Jeep) and access an AR platform rifle in the back of the vehicle, load it and engage the machete wielding killer. Students were graded on proper use of cover/concealment and while under stress if they could manipulate a rifle in order to stop the threat from killing more innocent civilians. Overall this was a great station and if you are not carrying a firearm in your person, you may have to access a long gun that is somewhere else in your vehicle to stop a spree killer. The use of Ultimate Training Munitions (UTM) made this station a true force on force scenario. By the way I played an unprepared victim having my hands in my pockets. 🙂

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Machete
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was with E.J. Owens, E.J. led our group through another scenario where we were loaded in the cab of a four-door Ford Super Duty and participants in certain seats were given Glock 17T‘s loaded with Simunition cartridges. E.J. explained that when in a vehicle you must be aware of the angles that you can shoot at considering the A-pillar and B-pillar may be in the way. We also talked about shooting through automotive glass and through door panels and how that may effect the trajectory of the projectile you are firing. We also talked about where you might want to be carrying your firearm so you can access it in case something like this happens to you. Remember, a handgun is commonly referred to as a side-arm because it should be at your side or more appropriately on your person and not in a glove compartment, center console box or for heaven’s sake not under the seat.

In the two scenarios in which I participated in, I was sitting in the driver’s seat. In scenario number one two armed men approached the vehicle on my side demanding the vehicle and money. I extinguished both of them with one shot each to their chest protectors and the scenario ended. In scenario number two I did not have a firearm, the person in the passenger seat did. While stopped an unarmed man came up to my window demanding money, but not posing a threat and as I was pushing the guy away from the vehicle the passenger made an attempt to shoot him. This was clearly a no-shoot situation; however, the decision the passenger made had deadly consequences for me, because he actually shot me with the Simunition cartridge. (In reality he shot my shirt; however, I felt no impact from the cartridge even though there was Simunition paint marking on my shirt) The lesson learned here is quite simple, don’t shoot your friend who is driving the vehicle. This was an excellent scenario, very realistic with the use of the Glock 17T’s and the Simunition cartridges.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 EJ station
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was set up with the participant walking in a parking lot to their vehicle and an actor approaches them asking for money. There were armed and unarmed confrontations, students were graded on if they could use “verbal judo” and keep the actor away from them and recognize the threat in time to draw their concealed firearm and deal with the situation. As with every encounter, you must watch the hands, they don’t lie and when someone you perceive to be a threat makes a furtive movement around their waist after you have given them commands “Get back, stay back” then you better be ready to use or threaten to use deadly force. (In Florida there are provisions in the statutes for the threatened use of deadly force) Again, overall a good scenario, the only thing I would have done a little different is added in some blank firing guns to make this a lot more realistic.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Bob
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

The next station was geared toward armed confrontations and handgun disarming techniques with Manny Cabrera. At this station we were introduced to Krav Maga handgun disarming techniques. Since I was there to learn I had an open mind and tried the Krav Maga technique; however, being that I was trained in the Lindell system of weapon retention and disarming I knew it would be very difficult for me to change those techniques since I have habituated them into a highly refined skill. The other part of this station had us in the driver’s seat of a sedan with the windows down. We were approached by an armed assailant and had to disarm him through the window and then given another technique to pin the gun against the dashboard near the A-pillar and then drive off. We also had a scenario where the armed assailant entered the vehicle in through a rear door and we had to disarm him in the car. Overall this was a good set of scenarios, as with the others they are problem solving and decision making then acting on our decisions.

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Manny
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

Lastly we worked on team tactics and some situational awareness skills with Andy Tolbert of Strong Defenses. These scenarios focused on how we must pay attention when riding in a car to the things happening around us at a traffic light. (The guy who comes up to wash your windshield at the intersection. The aggressive panhandler, etc…) The scenarios we ran here were great, as usual, Andy did an awesome job. (I might be a little biased since I trained with her a couple times and certified her in two NRA disciplines as well)

AAA Vehicle Counter Ambush Titusville April 15 2017 Andy
(Photo Credit: Paul Pawela and Assault Counter Tactics)

To summarize, this course was well thought out by Chief Instructor Paul Pawela and well executed by his team of Instructors. The scenarios were realistic to the things we see on a daily basis while watching the evening news.

Quoting the one and only Massad Ayoob, “Whether the fight is verbal or physical, the first law of human conflict is to be able to predict where the attack will come, and already have a counter in place for it.”

This course was well worth the $200.00 tuition and the proceeds benefited a real American hero, Colonel Danny McKnight. If you missed it, don’t feel bad, there will be others and I will host Paul in the Tampa Bay area for this course in the future. You can also find out Paul’s schedule by following his business Facebook page at: Assault Counter Tactics or find him on the world wide web at: http://www.assaultcountertactics.com/

 

Until next time …

Stay Safe & Train Hard!