Course Review: Dave Spaulding – Handgun Combatives – Adaptive Combat Pistol Course; April 21 & 22, 2018 – Watkinsville, Georgia.

I hate to start off by apologizing; however, it is easy to see that this course review is long overdue. The reason, my trusty write in the rain notebook has been missing in action ever since attending this course. All was right with the world when it was found yesterday afternoon under the rear seat in my vehicle, no idea how it got there, but sure am glad it was only temporarily misplaced as there were a lot of good notes from a few recently attended courses in there that would have been a shame to lose.

Ever since attending the Handgun CombativesVehicle Combatives course in Coffeyville, Kansas last September it has been a priority for me to try and take as many courses with Dave as my schedule will permit. Call it a thirst for knowledge if you will; however, Dave’s teaching style and his self-admitted warped sense of humor suits me well. I leave with better skills and also with some excellent information that I am able to transfer to the students and instructor candidates that I train in the process.

The day before the course I made the eight-hour drive to Athens, stopping to have a late lunch with a friend of mine just outside Atlanta. I arrived at the Comfort Inn & Suites on Atlanta Highway about 5:30pm and after grabbing dinner and making a stop Franklin Gun Shop I filled magazines and made sure all my gear was ready to go for the morning.

On TD1 of Handgun Combatives Adaptive Combat Pistol, we met at the range and Dave started with a brief introduction and presentation on his training methodology as most of the class had never taken a course with him before. If you follow Dave on social media you will see him with his trusty Webster’s dictionary by his side every so often on “Thoughts from the deck with Crown Royal” his definitions of the following are key to the program of instruction in this course.

Adapt = Change as required by circumstances.

Adaptive = The ability to change as required by circumstances.

To be Adaptive = To be able to change as required by circumstances.

Combative = Be ready and willing to fight.

After explaining these definitions and why he uses the words he does Dave went into Fundamentals vs. Essentials. Fundamentals are needed to form a foundation. Essentials are what is absolutely necessary and you should have a mastery of the essential skills.

Developing a combative mindset is first, followed by a list of things we all understand, e.g., grip, stance, presentation of the pistol on target the same way each time, etc… Dave went on to emphasize that in order to develop your essential skills, you need consistent, significant practice that is directed at fighting, also having an imagery of real-world threats and understand what violent encounters really are, not what you see in movies or the stages of a USPSA match.

On the range both days we started out with a three-round fade-back drill. Personally, I feel that I had a few too many “yips” on TD1 as you can see by my target below. In case you have never fired Dave’s fade-back drill it’s pretty easy, all you need is a 3×5 card target like the one pictured below, some ammunition and a range that allows you to shoot out to 25 yards. Start at 3 yards and fade back to 25, things get a little tough hitting that 3×5 card back at 20 and 25 yards. The course host, Chief Lee Weems shot a clean target on TD1, he was the only student to do so.

IMG_9478

The rest of TD1 was chalk full of one-handed shooting drills and the one-handed gun manipulations that go with them. The drills presented were excellent for establishing that foundation of skills Dave talked about prior to the range portion of the course. (Yeah, his program of instruction is well thought out) I liked the bucket drill and let’s face it, I like drills that help me identify things that I need to work on and those that I can share with others to make them better practitioners/students of pistolcraft.

Ever the coach, Dave keeps a watchful eye on his students offering some well-placed tips on how to get better with what you are working with. He also splits the class into two relays allowing himself time to give some individual coaching on the range, leave no doubt he gives his students 110% during the entire course.

Once we adjourned for the day the majority of us had a little BBQ at a local restaurant in Watkinsville and then a touch of Crown Royal at Chops & Hops.

On TD2 we did a lot of work behind simulated cover and some distance shooting. For the simulated cover drills, we used both plastic 55-gallon drums and a VTAC barricade working through the latter using many unconventional shooting positions. the distance shooting went out to 25 yards and culminated with the 5 in 5 drill, 5 rounds from 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 yards in 5 seconds from the holster. You can see an explanation and demonstration of the drill by the man himself in the video linked here.

The very last thing in the course of fire was to shoot Dave’s 2x2x2 drill. 2 rounds in 2 seconds from 20 feet from the holster on a 3×5 card target. Current LEO’s are allowed to use their duty gear, responsibly armed citizens all must start from a concealment holster. Those who are skilled enough to get two solid hits on target in the time allotted earn a Handgun Combatives engraved belt buckle and belt made by Ares Gear.

Unfortunately nobody earned a belt and buckle from this course; however, several students came very close. My effort produced two hits on target; however, I was overtime by .12 seconds. My mistake, letting the front sight settle a little too much looking for that perfect sight picture instead of just getting an acceptable sight picture and pressing the trigger. Maybe next time…

In summary, this is a course that tests your cognitive thinking abilities through the entire course of fire, Dave presents you a problem and you have to solve it, period. Same as a gunfight, your assailant will present you a problem and you will need to solve it or possibly die during the process. I mentioned it above, Dave’s course content and interactive personality (That will probably make him laugh) are what I enjoy about attending Handgun Combatives courses. Would I recommend this course? You bet I would and I think there are several Adaptive Combat Pistol courses on his remaining 2018 schedule that have a seat or two left in them.

Speaking of the Handgun Combatives training schedule, 2019 is published on his website and has only half of what 2018 had on it, Dave has been very public about teaching a more compact schedule in 2019 and beyond, so if you want to train with him I suggest you look at his schedule and make it happen, you can thank me later.

 

Gear used in the course is listed below:

Sig Sauer P320 X-Carry

Henry Holsters AIWB with V-Development Group AIWB Large Wedge

JMCK AIWB Mag Pouche(s)

5.11 Operator Belt

Surefire E2D Defender Ultra

My training ammunition was Federal American Eagle 147gr Flat Nose FMJ purchased from Target Sports USA.

 

(Featured Image Credit to Dave Spaulding and Handgun Combatives)

 

Until next time, be vigilant, be the best…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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2018 Mid-Year Training Report

As of yesterday, July 1st, 2018, I have taught twenty-eight (28) NRA Approved Courses for both Students and Instructor Candidates; Eight (8) closed enrollment courses for Law Enforcement Officers; Six (6) open enrollment courses for responsibly armed citizens; Five (5) USCCA Student level courses, and One (1) USCCA Instructor Development Workshop. Adding everything up I am at a count of four hundred forty-eight (448) students trained, that is an average of just over nine (9) students per course. The last number is showing a trend that enrollments are dropping off slightly from the last couple years.

Candidly, I’m pretty lucky in the fact that there are five locations that are both indoor and outdoor range facilities with fixed classrooms within an hours drive of me where I can teach and pass on knowledge, skills, and experience to my tribe of Students and Instructors.

As for my personal training schedule, 2018 is not even close to being on pace with 2017; however, this schedule still has me adding between 200 and 220 hours of continuing education. Remember that the importance of being a student can never be discounted, not to collect certificates, but to gather transferrable knowledge for students and instructor candidates is what it is all about for me. Listed below is where I have been and where I plan to go the rest of the year.

The weekend of February 10th and 11th, we hosted Gabe White and his Pistol Shooting Solutions course at Firearms Training Club of America in Lakeland, Florida. When I first had contacted Gabe in early 2017 we set up the date and then had the course sold out ten (10) months in advance on phone calls, mostly to the Rangemaster tribe. If you’d like to train with Gabe you can find Gabe’s open enrollment training schedule in the link below.

http://www.gabewhitetraining.com/pistol-shooting-solutions/

On March 3rd and 4th, we hosted Patrick McNamara for his T.A.P.S. Pistol/Carbine Combo course, again at Firearms Training Club of America. If you follow this blog you know that I attended Pat’s Sentinal course in South Carolina last December at Panteao Productions, a course review was posted here and is linked below. You can also find Pat’s open enrollment courses in the second link below.

T.M.A.C.S., Inc Sentinal Course Review South Carolina

http://www.tmacsinc.com/

In mid-March, I drove thirty hours round trip to North Little Rock, Arkansas to attend Tom and Lynn Givens 20th Anniversary Rangemaster Tactical Conference at the Direct Action Resource Center, better known as DARC. Although I had to leave early on Saturday afternoon, #TACCON2018 allowed me to sit in on a few blocks of instruction and also shoot in the Polite Society Pistol Match. There were over twenty-five people who shot a perfect score in the match to get into the shoot-off that was won by Gabe White, I wasn’t one of them; however, my 199/200 was respectable. If you are planning on attending in 2019 you had better get on the stick now, this event sells out each year in mid to late October and Mr. Givens recently said that it is currently half full. A link for 2019 registration is below.

Rangemaster #TACCON2019

On April 7th and 8th, Tom Givens presented his Rangemaster Combative Pistol course at Firearms Training Club of America for about a dozen students. Unfortunately, I was only able to attend TD1, if you follow this blog, you would know that this course kicked off my personal training schedule in 2017, it got me back to the basics and it was an excellent tune-up for the other courses that I was fortunate enough to attend last year. A full course review on my Rangemaster Combative Pistol experience is published in the link below.

Rangemaster Combative Pistol April 1-2, 2017

On April 9th through the 12th it was back in God’s country at SIG SAUER Academy for Dynamic Performance Pistol and Skill Builder Red Dot Defensive Pistol. Truth be told, I skipped the second course because the weather was freezing, 28° each day and even though the temperature rose to 40° on the thermometer the wind chill factor never let it get above freezing, just too damn cold for this Florida boy. I spent the two extra days in Boston with some close friends and saw a Yankees vs. Red Sox game complete with a bench-clearing brawl. Nothing was quite as exciting as that, even sat atop the “green monstah” in Fenway Park, an experience of a lifetime. By the way, a course review of the Dynamic Performance Pistol course in this blog, you will find it in the link below.

SIG SAUER Dynamic Performance Pistol Course Review

www.sigsaueracademy.com

On April 21st and 22nd, it was on to Watkinsville, Georgia attending Dave Spaulding’s Handgun Combatives, Adaptive Combat Pistol course. Let me tell you, I really enjoy Dave’s teaching style, and if you don’t follow him on social media you are seriously missing out on plenty of knowledge bombs that come from a man with a lifetime of experience in teaching the combative application of the handgun. 2018 will be Dave’s last year teaching a full schedule, in 2019 he will be only teaching about a half schedule. To find his complete course schedule click on the link below and then click on “Upcoming Classes” at the top of the homepage.

http://www.handguncombatives.com/

The weekend of May 4th, 5th, and 6th it was to Dallas, Texas for the NRA Annual Meetings. Having been to Dallas only once before and on that trip, I wasn’t able to see Dealy Plaza, the grassy knoll, and of course the Six Floor Museum at what was the Texas School Book Depository building, you can bet that I didn’t miss out on that opportunity this time around. Once again, I volunteered at the #NRAAM as a Firearms Examiner and will continue to do so each year. On Saturday afternoon my colleague David Matthews and I hosted the first ever NRA Training Counselor Forum and Networking event thanks to NRA Education & Training Department Deputy Director, John Howard.

Also as part of the #NRAAM on Friday, May 4th I was invited to attend the first offering of the NRA CCW Instructor course. This course is highly recommended to those teaching Concealed Carry, it has court defensible curriculum and can be tailored to fit any state statutory requirement for training. It also has its own qualification course of fire and of course allows for the substitution of a state-mandated qualification if need be. Currently, the NRA Education & Training Department is rolling this course out nationwide to Training Counselors and they expect to release it to those of us who have been trained and certified so we can start offering it to Certified Instructors later this year. You can find out more about the NRA Annual Meetings in the link below, see you in Indianapolis next April 26th, 27th, and 28th.

https://www.nraam.org/

Which brings us to June and “NRA Instructor Immersion Weeks.” This was the fifth offering of the program, it has become very popular with my students and instructor candidates as they can attend multiple courses over a few short weeks. 2019 Instructor Immersion Weeks is already in the planning stages, it will probably be more of an “NRA Instructor Immersion Month,” more details to follow in October when my 2019 is announced.

The rest of the summer will be primarily teaching on the road and very little here at home due to our summer weather. In August my travels take me to Alabama, North Carolina, and Kansas and then to both South Carolina and Virginia in order to attend a couple courses as both a student and instructor candidate. The entire month of August I will sleep six or seven nights in my own bed.

Then there is the month of September and another trip to God’s country and the SIG SAUER Academy. This will be my fifth trip up there and I am just as excited for number five as I was a year ago for trip number one. If you have not trained at this world-class facility you should ask yourself why not? You can find all of their course listings in the link below.

www.sigsaueracademy.com

The last weekend of September Gabe White will return for a second course that sold out several months ago. It’s hard not to be excited to train with Gabe, he is a Grand Master level shooter that has the ability to transfer knowledge in a thought-provoking manner that is rare in this industry. Once again, you can find his training schedule on his website linked below.

http://www.gabewhitetraining.com/pistol-shooting-solutions/

In October and November, my plan is to attend a few closed enrollment training courses and hopefully, the Rangemaster Defensive Shotgun Instructor Development Course the weekend of November 16th, 17th, and 18th. Back in October 2016 myself and over twenty others attended the first offering of this course, it was outstanding. Tom preaches the gospel of the gauge well, bring your semi-auto or pump gun and don’t forget the Federal FliteControl® 8-pellet 00BK (LE13300), you can thank me later for the suggestion and register in the link below.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/defensive-shotgun-instructor-course-3-day-tickets-39454107297?aff=ehomecard

December presents a few forty hour courses that are under consideration; however, I can only attend one or two and won’t be able to make a final decision on those until September or early October.

So, as you can see, 2018’s schedule is nowhere near the nineteen (19) courses that I attended in 2017; however, the amount and frequency of training commitments have me busier than I have ever been in my life. No complaints here…

Question for you; with the year half over, are you on track to reach your training goals?

 

Until next time, be vigilant, be the best…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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2018 NRA Instructor Immersion Weeks (Florida)

On July 1st, 2018 one of the many changes in the most recent update to the NRA Training Counselor Guide will take effect. In pertinent point, the NRA’s Education and Training Department has changed its policies and procedures requiring all Instructor Candidates to attend and pass the corresponding basic level course prior to attending an Instructor course in any discipline. Currently, only Pistol Instructor and Personal Protection Outside the Home require this, I am unsure about the Muzzleloading and both Reloading disciplines because I am not certified to teach those courses and there have been a lot of changes since I became a Training Counselor to the Muzzleloading disciplines.

So, the 2018 version of Instructor Immersion Weeks here in Florida will be the last of its kind and I see 2019 being Instructor Immersion Month, and in fact, I have already scheduled it on my long-range planning calendar for June 2019.

This mandate by the NRA Education and Training Department has been greeted with mixed feelings by the Training Counselor and Instructor community. Personally, I feel it is a change that has been needed for a long time. It allows the Training Counselor the opportunity to evaluate each individual Instructor Candidate in two classes over two full days of training on their knowledge, skills, and most importantly, their attitude.

The detractors say it is a money grab by the NRA, yeah right, because they make so much money on selling materials priced between $10 to $25 dollars, not even close. The NRA Education and Training Department has always had a policy that Training Counselors were to provide the corresponding Student package to all Instructor candidates, so that dog won’t hunt. They finally made this change because they were getting feedback from the Training Counselors that it was needed to create better Instructors, quality over quantity and the NRA listened.

Sadly, we will still have Training Counselors and Instructors not teaching according to the lesson plans, in fact recently one of my Instructors told me his Range Safety Officer course had only two guns for use by the students. Hint: The lesson plan calls for six different long gun action types, both revolver action types and a semi-automatic pistol, muzzleloading firearms, air guns and a BB gun. If you count that up that is twelve at a minimum. His Chief Range Safety Officer who is also a Training Counselor was ten shy of a dozen, a clear violation of policies and procedures, but I digress.

The schedule for 2018 Instructor Immersion Weeks will be as follows.

I am offering Basic Instructor Training or BIT three times prior to the start and once during the weeks so people can get their BIT updated as that is a requirement if you have not taken BIT in the previous twenty-four (24) months. There is no charge for BIT, it comes with your paid tuition to a discipline-specific Instructor course.

Discipline Specific Training Schedule:

NRA Basic Range Safety Officer Course
Monday, June 11th

NRA Basics of Pistol Shooting Instructor -Led Training Course
Friday, June 15th

NRA Instructor Pistol Shooting Course
Saturday, June 16th

NRA Chief Range Safety Officer Course
Monday, June 18th

NRA Instructor Personal Protection In the Home Course
Tuesday, June 19th

NRA Instructor Home Firearm Safety Course
Thursday, June 21st

NRA Instructor Rifle Shooting Course
Saturday, June 23rd

NRA Personal Protection Outside the Home Basic and Instructor Course
Wednesday-Thursday-Friday, June 27th, 28th, 29th

NRA Instructor Shotgun Shooting Course
Saturday, June 30th

NRA Refuse to be a Victim Instructor Development Workshop
Saturday, July 7th

Registrations began the week before last and have been brisk with my current base of Instructors getting in first before the masses. If you are wanting to get in and add some disciplines I’d suggest you make your plans now because seating is limited. Previous student discounts do apply, and multiple course discounts for new students will also apply.

 

Be vigilant, be the best!

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: SIG SAUER Academy Dynamic Performance Pistol; April 9th & 10th, 2018, Epping, New Hampshire.

Earlier this month I was at SIG SAUER Academy to attend “Gun School” for the fourth time in nine months, and so to say that I might be familiar with the Southwest Airlines nonstop between Tampa and Manchester would be an understatement. As with my three previous trips I stayed at the Hampton Inn & Suites in Exeter using the SIG SAUER Academy discounted rate.

Since my visit in October, the student check-in process has changed slightly. All students now report to the Academy Pro Shop on TD1 of the course that they are attending to sign in and receive their course book. I would suspect that this is a welcome change to the staff as the students can select and pay for lunch from Hammersmith Sandwich Company in the morning and then pick up their lunch in the Indoor Range without interrupting the staff of the Pro Shop while they serve customers and of course Kathleen, the Academy Training Coordinator to pick up their lunches.

The course started for the eight of us inside classroom #7 out in Area 51 along with Academy Senior Instructor, Steven Gilcreast. We went over some basic safety rules and of course the differences between performance-based training objectives and outcome-based training objectives.

Dynamic Performance Pistol is an Intermediate level course and everything is geared to the student being focused on shooting each drill a minimum of three times, and having a goal to set a time and beat our time on the two subsequent runs or if it was a scored course of fire we were trying to beat our score with a higher point value. Sometimes the drill was a combination of both, scored for points and time adding in any penalties. I tend to like this method of training as it allows me to focus on what I can improve on to make each run better than the last. The difference between outcome-based and performance-based training objectives.

Once on the range, all of us were subject to 28° temperature and even though it warmed up to 40° later in the day, the windchill factor never rose above freezing. Personally, I have not experienced cold weather like that in nearly twenty years and candidly, I don’t see myself going back to the Academy for an outdoor course unless it is in June, July, August or September.

Our first few drills were designed to work on fundamentals mostly with respect to pressing the trigger properly using different cadences from 1s per shot to .50s per shot and even down to .25s per shot. Steve noticed I was pinning the trigger on my P320 X-Carry and not resetting and prepping for the next shot under recoil, and honestly, this is a problem that I struggled with off an on during the day. I fixed it later and yet I was still having some accuracy issues at distance. The good thing is I was able to identify these issues in training and since arriving back home I have gone back to shooting more bullseyes.

At the end of TD1, we had shot right at about 400 rounds running more than a half dozen drills three times each. At the end of TD1, I think all of us were looking forward to getting inside out of the cold.

After dinner at Telly’s Restaurant in Epping, I went back to my hotel and work on some dry practice and also to work on movement and footwork in the small gym that was located across from my first-floor room.

TD2 started on the range with a quick warm-up exercise and then we were right back into the drills. On this day we worked mostly on drills that involved a lot of movement and how to shoot accurately while on the move; however, one TD2 drill, Steve’s “Dirty Thirty” on an IPSC target didn’t involve movement, it involved shooting 30 rounds from 30 yards, trying to complete the drill in under 30 seconds. We practiced this drill from a couple shorter distances before venturing out to 30 yards, by doing this it helped work on technique and accuracy. I believe this is an excellent drill and the only one that I will give you the course of fire for in this review.

The Dirty Thirty: Starting with three 10 round magazines on the command, draw and fire 10 rounds in a two-handed standing position, reload and fire 5 rounds using strong hand only, then 5 using opposite hand only, reload and fire 5 rounds kneeling and finish with 5 rounds in the prone position as mentioned on an IPSC target.

If you are considering attending this course it is important for you to know that Steve is excellent at adapting the Dynamic Performance Pistol course of fire to fit the abilities of the students; however, this course is an Intermediate level course. Additionally, Steve teaches by the SIG SAUER Academy training methodology of “EDIP” or Explain, Demonstrate, Imitate, Practice. After explaining the drills he demonstrated several different ways to progress through the drill, even physically walking some of them and doing it faster than most of us as we ran it.

Just so you know, two students ended up ringing the gong on TD1, for not knowing the status of their guns. It was a sound we heard a couple times in the distance from other the ranges located on the property. Thankfully nobody from our course had to ring the gong on TD2.

My Gear and Equipment:

Gun(s): SIG SAUER P320 X-Carry and P320 full-size RX with Romeo 1.

Holster: Comp-Tac International strong-side OWB. (SIG SAUER Academy requires you use a strong-side hip holster in this particular course)

Ammunition: Federal American Eagle 147gr Flat Nose FMJ, this has been my preferred practice ammunition for the last two years, it is very accurate and I have had no ammunition related stoppages in the cycle of operations of my handguns while using it, so I’ll stick with what works.

Flashlight: Surefire Dual Fuel Fury Tactical 1,500 Lumens

In summary, this is an excellent course that will test your skills in both gun handling and shooting. From the strict focus on accuracy and the use of a shot timer on nearly every drill to moving with unholstered firearms. The course of fire is true to the advertised 1,000 rounds and I highly recommend it for the Intermediate to the Advanced Practitioner.

I look forward to my next visit to SIG SAUER Academy this summer.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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“The Gospel of the Gauge” – Patterning your Shotgun for Professional/Duty and or Home or Self-Defense use.

One of my mentors, Tom Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services refers to Shotgun Training as “The Gospel of the Gauge” especially when it is done on a Sunday. (Don’t lie, you laughed) Tom also says that “Patterning your shotgun is critical, but an often overlooked aspect of being prepared to use that gun in self-defense.”

I have patterned a few shotguns before and understand that many people do not because they are living in some type of an alternate reality believing that a shotgun doesn’t need to be aimed and that somehow their payload will magically find their intended target. The hard reality is you must practice sound fundamentals and have both a steady aim and good trigger control in order to hit your target, even with a shotgun.

Before I get started, I’d like to ask all of the Gun Pretenders, YouTube, and Instagram Instructors and of course those famous Keyboard Operators out there, please stop recommending birdshot for professional/duty and or home or self-defense. Birdshot offers less than adequate penetration and besides, birdshot is for shooting what … the correct answer would be, you guessed it, birds.

OK, let’s talk about how to pattern your shotgun.

In order to establish a control group, I recommend placing three (3) shots on a target with a variety of payloads, each from the exact same distance, 15yds or 45ft. The POA or Point of Aim I chose with my Beretta 1301 Tactical was the center of the “A” Zone on an I.P.S.C. (International Practical Shooting Confederation) target. (Yes, I patterned the gun with some birdshot and I used a distance of 10yds or 30ft for those payloads)

Sure you could use five shots and most often in zeroing my rifle I will use a five shot group because I want to make sure that I minimize the outliers or as Pat McNamara calls them, “Junebugs.” However, I feel that three shot groups are sufficient to get an accurate feel of the payload and what it will do when launched from your shoulder-fired shotgun.

The reason I specifically mention shoulder-fired shotgun is that there are a couple new kids on the block, the Remington TAC-14, and the Mossberg 590A1 Shockwave. These shotguns have been available for over a year now and maybe close to two; however, they are basically hand cannons and are difficult to shoot with much accuracy using full-power payloads even for the most experienced of shooters. One man, “Brobee223” on YouTube has perfected the art and was very successful using his Mossberg 590A1 Shockwave to bag a couple deer late last year. I have linked his video below, give it a look. Fair warning, it is rather lengthy.

Back on track with patterning my Beretta 1301 Tactical. The first load I chose to shoot was by far the best and it really comes as no surprise. The Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 00BK, 8-Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad (LE13300) is the choice of many an experienced shotgunner. As you can see in the photo below, all twenty-four (24) pellets from my three shot group landed within a 3″ group with the three (3) larger holes being the wads.

IMG_6410

Below are photos of my other targets, using different loads, showing their patterns.

Federal 2 3/4″ 000BK, 8 Pellet, Maximum. (F127000)

IMG_6411

Olin Corporation 2 3/4″ 00BK, 9 Pellet Military Grade. (Brown Box)

IMG_6412

Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 1BK, 15 Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad. (LE132 1B) This was the second best pattern; however, I find that the 1BK is not as consistent as the 8 Pellet 00BK patterned in the first photo.

IMG_6413

Federal 2 3/4″ 4BK, 27 Pellet, Maximum. (F127 4B) Just to big of a spread for me at this range and not something I would recommend for professional/duty or home or self-defense use.

IMG_6414

As I mentioned above, I wanted to put some birdshot on target and here are the results. Birdshot Federal #4 Shot “Heavy Field Load” – 2 3/4″ – 1 1/8oz – 10yds (Take note, the larger holes were made by the wad, not the shot) This sure appears to be a tight pattern, it’s the lack of penetration that makes birdshot suboptimal in its effectiveness for professional/duty or home or self-defense use.

IMG_6415

Winchester Super Target #8 Shot 2 3/4″ 1oz – 10yds (Once again, the larger holes were made by the wad, not the shot) Same result, fairly tight pattern; however, penetration with this payload would also be an issue.

IMG_6416

So, once you have established a control group and your desired starting distance (Mine was 15yds) and you have selected the payload that you feel works best in your shotgun, it’s time to find out what the maximum effective range of your shotgun is with that particular load. In order to determine that, you will want to run your shotgun out to a distance and stop when you find the point at which you can keep all of your pellets from your chosen payload inside an 8″ to no more than 12″ pattern. I’d also recommend not only shooting cardboard or paper targets alone, make sure to shoot some steel as well. I happen to use 12″ AR500 discs that are 3/8″ thick, they work well with 00BK at this range.

From this test, it’s easy to see that my 1301T likes the Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 00BK 8-Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad (LE13300) best at 15 yards. From previous experience with this payload, I can move back as far as 30yds and still keep the pattern inside an 8″ to 12″ group and that is precisely the reason I choose this particular load for my shotgun.

When I can find some time in between the courses that I am teaching and the ones I am attending as a student this spring and summer I will pattern my Vang Comp Systems Remington 870P to find out exactly what it likes best. Candidly, I suspect that there will be some similarities; however, one never knows until we put in the work.

If you need assistance in patterning your shotgun for professional/duty or home or self-defense use please consult a reputable Instructor/Coach who is familiar with the nuances of patterning a shotgun and can give you proper advice on the appropriate payload for your intended use as well.

Winding up I would be remiss if I didn’t give you an opportunity to train with Mr. Givens as he preaches “The Gospel of the Gauge” later this year in Lakeland, Florida. If you are an Instructor or aspire to be one I’d highly recommend that you train with Tom and Lynn Givens. For more information on the Rangemaster Shotgun Instructor Development course, please see below.

Rangemaster Defensive Shotgun Instructor Development Course
Chief Instructor: Tom Givens
November 16-18, 2018
Firearms Training Club of America, Inc
Lakeland, Florida (Private Range)
Tuition: $595.00

Register Here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/defensive-shotgun-instructor-course-3-day-tickets-39454107297

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Gun Pretenders a/k/a the Grass Eaters of the Firearms Training Industry courtesy of industry giant, John Farnam.

Many people ask where did I come up with the term, “Gun Pretenders” or “Grass Eaters” when referring to some in the firearms training industry. I respond with, it’s not original to me, all credit goes to industry giant John Farnam. I’ll let him explain as he says it best in this Quip from August 2013… There is a funny story about this quip, I was having dinner with John and Vicki in Ohio last November and mentioned this as being my very favorite quip and asked why it was not in the archives. When I returned to my hotel room after doing a little grocery shopping for lunch an email arrived from John with the quip attached. If you are not subscribed to John’s blog you should be. Find him at Defense Training International.

22 Aug 13

Gun Pretenders

Recently, a gun “safety instructor” in OH accidentally shot a student in a classroom during a “gun-safety course.” The injury was serious, but not life-threatening.

Now, we learn this was not the first such “accident” on the part of this particular “safety instructor.” Years ago, he “accidentally” injured yet another person during a similar, foolish gun stunt. I wonder how many other “accidents” with guns (that were never reported) this person has had between these two.

I don’t know this person personally, so I’m just using the foregoing as an example of what I see all too often hanging around ranges, on range “committees,” and purporting to be “instructors.”

We call them “Gun Pretenders.”

Most don’t even carry a gun. When they do, it is not the same gun, nor carry-option, they use for demonstration purposes on the range (on those rare occasions when they actually perform in front of students). For many, their only involvement with guns is some form of sterile, non-serious recreation.

When supposedly “instructing” students on a live range, many don’t carry a gun, even then! When asked why they invariably bleat that they don’t want to be embarrassed when asked to personally demonstrate something they’re teaching! “It might damage my credibility,” I’ve repeatedly heard them say. I don’t know what they’re worried about!

And, they dearly love to shower themselves with pious “titles,” invariably ending in “… master” or “…wizard,” and we never get to know where all these dubious “titles” came from. For one, I’m always suspicious when someone purporting to be an “instructor” finds it necessary to endlessly recite his entire resume, in boring detail, sometimes for twenty minutes or so, before finally getting to the point. When we all don’t already know whom he is, it strikes me as a strategy of desperation!

When sitting down with these people at a restaurant, away from the range, assuming I can get a word in edgewise, I often ask, “… yes, but are you personally carrying a gun right now?” You can probably guess the answer, “… well, of course not.” I generally have no further questions!

Competent instructors are well-trained, humble, accessible, eager to learn, eager to teach, have lots of personal experience, and actually “live” the Art. We don’t live piously withdrawn from it. We are driven to spread the sunshine, and we measure our success by that of our students.

Pretenders are mouthy, shallow, self-centered, self-righteous, vain, pseudo-sanctimonious, and constantly afraid. They spend their time, not worried about students, nor our Art, but desperately trying to maintain the myth of competence. As noted above, on those rare occasions when they do actually carry a gun, it and its “holster,” are unfailingly phony, glistening monstrosities, built strictly for irrelevant competition. These pretentious toys spend all the rest of their time in a padded, mahogany box in a dresser-drawer, gathering dust.

And, if you’re wondering if there is a point lurking in all this, here it is: A gun-owner, and particularly a gun-carrier, has the individual responsibility to acquire and maintain personal competence. History and fate will not accept lame excuses, nor will the court!

When you voluntarily take-on the personal responsibility to have the ability to protect yourself with gunfire, then you must be able to perform adequately, on demand. This has nothing to do with recreation nor competition. It is an individual, ethical responsibility, a matter of personal integrity and character. Bottom line: learn to be competent with your weapon(s) and yourself.

Become one of us, or go back to eating grass!

“How the hell did you know I didn’t have the king or the ace?”

“I recollect a young man putting that same question to Eddie the Dude. ‘Son,’ Eddie told him, ‘all you paid was the lookin’ price. Lessons are extra!’”

Lecture, caustically delivered by Lancey “The Man” Howard (played by Edward G Robinson) to a hapless “Slade” (played by Elmore “Rip” Torn) in the 1965 feature film, “The Cincinnati Kid.”

John Farnam

 

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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The Trigger Control Dot Org 2017 Year in Review!

Twenty Seventeen was nothing short of a whirlwind. The numbers really don’t tell the entire story, but you are gonna get ’em anyway.

I taught thirty-seven NRA Student and Instructor courses, and eight closed enrollment courses of my own curriculum for Law Enforcement Officers, and twelve courses of my own curriculum for various groups of Responsibly Armed Citizens.

That is a total of sixty-seven courses, down six from last years seventy-three. I had some help, thanks to all my friends who gave their time to assist me with some of the courses I taught both here in Florida and elsewhere. I would be remiss if I didn’t thank my hosts as well. Without them, none of this would be possible especially the out of state courses.

My student/instructor candidate count is still being tabulated. Unfortunately, I have to count my signed waivers to get an accurate number due to a computer crash earlier this year. The number will be comfortably above eight hundred, down from last years count of nine hundred thirty-six.

Here is the really fun part, last year I was able to attend nineteen training courses as a student or instructor candidate, and I even took a hit of pepper spray for a training video as well. This just in, I think my friend Mike enjoyed seeing me in pain.

Below is a complete listing of the courses I attended along with the locations. Those with hyperlinks in the listing have course reviews posted in this blog, if you click on the link you will be directed to each of them individually.

April 1-2 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Combative Pistol Course; OK Corral Gun Club in Okeechobee, Florida.

April 15 – Assault Counter Tactics – Vehicle Counter Ambush Course; American Police Hall of Fame in Titusville, Florida.

May 9-10 – GLOCK Operator Course; GLOCK/GSSF Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia.

May 19-20-21 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Advanced Combative Pistol Three Day Format; Oconee County Sheriff’s Office in Watkinsville, Georgia.

June 13-14-15 – General Dynamics Simunitions® Scenario Instructor and Safety Certification Course; Titusville Police Department in Titusville, Florida.

June 26-27 – SIG SAUER Academy Master Pistol Instructor Course; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

July 22 – Tactical Combat Casualty Couse (T.C.C.C.) On Point Safety and Defense; Wyoming Antelope Club in Clearwater, Florida.

August 14- 15, 17-18 – SIG SAUER Academy P320 Armorer, M400®/M16/M4/AR15 Armorer, Low Light Pistol Instructor Course; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

August 26-27 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Advanced Firearms Instructor Development Course; FPF Training, Stone Quarry Range in Culpeper, Virginia.

September 9-10 – Handgun Combatives Vehicle Combatives Course; Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office in Coffeyville, Kansas.

October 7-8 – Ken Hackathorn Advanced Pistol Course Aztec Training Services; Burro Canyon Shooting Park in Azuza, California.

October 23 – SIG SAUER Academy Bullets and Vehicles; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

November 11-12 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Instructor Reunion Conference; BDC Gun Room in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

November 17-18-19 – Defense Training International John and Vicki Farnam Advanced Defensive Handgun and Instructor Course; On Guard Defense in New Plymouth, Ohio.

December 4-5-6 – NRA Practical Pistol Coach School; NRA Headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia.

December 16-17 – Pat McNamara, TMACS, Inc. Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail; Panteao Productions and Sandlapper Rifle Range and Gun Club in Swansea, South Carolina.

Altogether, I traveled in and out of fourteen different airports, not including airports where I changed planes. Added nearly ten thousand miles to my vehicle for business purposes and rented fifteen vehicles from Budget, Dollar, and Enterprise. (Never again from the last two, I’ll stick with Budget Fastbreak) Had to rent a car in order to make the last leg home from Atlanta after attending Dave Spaulding’s Vehicle Combatives course in Kansas because Hurricane Irene closed all of the airports in Florida, that trip became known as “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.”

Additionally, I earned a lot of hotel points last year with both IHG and Hilton staying eighty-five nights in hotel rooms from Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Hilton Garden Inn, and Hampton Inn & Suites.

In early October I signed a consulting contract with a television network and I am negotiating one with a production studio as I type this blog post. Like it or not, traveling to Southern California will once again be part of the agenda in twenty eighteen.

Last year I also developed two new courses that moving forward will be part of my course catalog. One is an all-new one-day Handgun Essentials course and the other is also a one-day course that will be shot almost exclusively on steel, the name of this course is still in the works, but I kind of like “Steel Skill Drills Challenge.” This course will challenge your skills greatly and will also be somewhat of a stress inoculator with each and every drill using a shot timer, and yes, there will be a lot of movement as well.

It was a down year for book reading, I only read ten books last year and I am finishing my eleventh. The list is as follows:

T.A.P.S. Tactical Application of Practical Shooting – Patrick McNamara
Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail – Patrick McNamara
Mission America – Straight Talk About Military Transition – LTC (Retired) Scott Mann
Handgun Combatives – Dave Spaulding
Forensic Analysis of the April 11, 1986 FBI Firefight – W. French Anderson
Motor Learning and Performance: Instructors’ Guide – Richard A. Schmidt
The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills – Daniel  Coyle
With Winning In Mind – Lenny Bassham
The Farnam Method of Defensive Handgunning – John S. Farnam
Teaching Women To Shoot; A Law Enforcement Instructor’s Guide – Vicki Farnam
Guns & Warriors DTI Quips Volume I – John S. Farnam

I saved this one for last because a friend and mentor signed it and sent it to me as a gift:

Straight Talk on Armed Defense – What the Experts Want You to Know, Edited by Massad Ayoob with Dr. William Aprill, Dr. Alexis Artwohl, Massad Ayoob, Detective Spencer Blue, Ron Borsch, Craig “Southnarc” Douglas, Jim Fleming, Esq., Tom Givens, Marty Hayes, JD, John Hearne, Chief Harvey Hedden, Dr. Anthony Simone.

I’ll wind this up with some of the best news I received in a long time came last week from Go Daddy, they finally unlocked my domain name and instead of pointing at my Facebook page it will be back to a real website. What an ordeal after over a year of problems with a web design company who took control of my website and basically held me hostage. Look for the all-new website to launch later this month!

For now, I’ll leave you with the words of Pat McNamara…

Getchusum!!!

Ready-Ready-Break!!!

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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