Course Review: SIG SAUER Academy Dynamic Performance Pistol; April 9th & 10th, 2018, Epping, New Hampshire.

Earlier this month I was at SIG SAUER Academy to attend “Gun School” for the fourth time in nine months, and so to say that I might be familiar with the Southwest Airlines nonstop between Tampa and Manchester would be an understatement. As with my three previous trips I stayed at the Hampton Inn & Suites in Exeter using the SIG SAUER Academy discounted rate.

Since my visit in October, the student check-in process has changed slightly. All students now report to the Academy Pro Shop on TD1 of the course that they are attending to sign in and receive their course book. I would suspect that this is a welcome change to the staff as the students can select and pay for lunch from Hammersmith Sandwich Company in the morning and then pick up their lunch in the Indoor Range without interrupting the staff of the Pro Shop while they serve customers and of course Kathleen, the Academy Training Coordinator to pick up their lunches.

The course started for the eight of us inside classroom #7 out in Area 51 along with Academy Senior Instructor, Steven Gilcreast. We went over some basic safety rules and of course the differences between performance-based training objectives and outcome-based training objectives.

Dynamic Performance Pistol is an Intermediate level course and everything is geared to the student being focused on shooting each drill a minimum of three times, and having a goal to set a time and beat our time on the two subsequent runs or if it was a scored course of fire we were trying to beat our score with a higher point value. Sometimes the drill was a combination of both, scored for points and time adding in any penalties. I tend to like this method of training as it allows me to focus on what I can improve on to make each run better than the last. The difference between outcome-based and performance-based training objectives.

Once on the range, all of us were subject to 28° temperature and even though it warmed up to 40° later in the day, the windchill factor never rose above freezing. Personally, I have not experienced cold weather like that in nearly twenty years and candidly, I don’t see myself going back to the Academy for an outdoor course unless it is in June, July, August or September.

Our first few drills were designed to work on fundamentals mostly with respect to pressing the trigger properly using different cadences from 1s per shot to .50s per shot and even down to .25s per shot. Steve noticed I was pinning the trigger on my P320 X-Carry and not resetting and prepping for the next shot under recoil, and honestly, this is a problem that I struggled with off an on during the day. I fixed it later and yet I was still having some accuracy issues at distance. The good thing is I was able to identify these issues in training and since arriving back home I have gone back to shooting more bullseyes.

At the end of TD1, we had shot right at about 400 rounds running more than a half dozen drills three times each. At the end of TD1, I think all of us were looking forward to getting inside out of the cold.

After dinner at Telly’s Restaurant in Epping, I went back to my hotel and work on some dry practice and also to work on movement and footwork in the small gym that was located across from my first-floor room.

TD2 started on the range with a quick warm-up exercise and then we were right back into the drills. On this day we worked mostly on drills that involved a lot of movement and how to shoot accurately while on the move; however, one TD2 drill, Steve’s “Dirty Thirty” on an IPSC target didn’t involve movement, it involved shooting 30 rounds from 30 yards, trying to complete the drill in under 30 seconds. We practiced this drill from a couple shorter distances before venturing out to 30 yards, by doing this it helped work on technique and accuracy. I believe this is an excellent drill and the only one that I will give you the course of fire for in this review.

The Dirty Thirty: Starting with three 10 round magazines on the command, draw and fire 10 rounds in a two-handed standing position, reload and fire 5 rounds using strong hand only, then 5 using opposite hand only, reload and fire 5 rounds kneeling and finish with 5 rounds in the prone position as mentioned on an IPSC target.

If you are considering attending this course it is important for you to know that Steve is excellent at adapting the Dynamic Performance Pistol course of fire to fit the abilities of the students; however, this course is an Intermediate level course. Additionally, Steve teaches by the SIG SAUER Academy training methodology of “EDIP” or Explain, Demonstrate, Imitate, Practice. After explaining the drills he demonstrated several different ways to progress through the drill, even physically walking some of them and doing it faster than most of us as we ran it.

Just so you know, two students ended up ringing the gong on TD1, for not knowing the status of their guns. It was a sound we heard a couple times in the distance from other the ranges located on the property. Thankfully nobody from our course had to ring the gong on TD2.

My Gear and Equipment:

Gun(s): SIG SAUER P320 X-Carry and P320 full-size RX with Romeo 1.

Holster: Comp-Tac International strong-side OWB. (SIG SAUER Academy requires you use a strong-side hip holster in this particular course)

Ammunition: Federal American Eagle 147gr Flat Nose FMJ, this has been my preferred practice ammunition for the last two years, it is very accurate and I have had no ammunition related stoppages in the cycle of operations of my handguns while using it, so I’ll stick with what works.

Flashlight: Surefire Dual Fuel Fury Tactical 1,500 Lumens

In summary, this is an excellent course that will test your skills in both gun handling and shooting. From the strict focus on accuracy and the use of a shot timer on nearly every drill to moving with unholstered firearms. The course of fire is true to the advertised 1,000 rounds and I highly recommend it for the Intermediate to the Advanced Practitioner.

I look forward to my next visit to SIG SAUER Academy this summer.

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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“The Gospel of the Gauge” – Patterning your Shotgun for Professional/Duty and or Home or Self-Defense use.

One of my mentors, Tom Givens from Rangemaster Firearms Training Services refers to Shotgun Training as “The Gospel of the Gauge” especially when it is done on a Sunday. (Don’t lie, you laughed) Tom also says that “Patterning your shotgun is critical, but an often overlooked aspect of being prepared to use that gun in self-defense.”

I have patterned a few shotguns before and understand that many people do not because they are living in some type of an alternate reality believing that a shotgun doesn’t need to be aimed and that somehow their payload will magically find their intended target. The hard reality is you must practice sound fundamentals and have both a steady aim and good trigger control in order to hit your target, even with a shotgun.

Before I get started, I’d like to ask all of the Gun Pretenders, YouTube, and Instagram Instructors and of course those famous Keyboard Operators out there, please stop recommending birdshot for professional/duty and or home or self-defense. Birdshot offers less than adequate penetration and besides, birdshot is for shooting what … the correct answer would be, you guessed it, birds.

OK, let’s talk about how to pattern your shotgun.

In order to establish a control group, I recommend placing three (3) shots on a target with a variety of payloads, each from the exact same distance, 15yds or 45ft. The POA or Point of Aim I chose with my Beretta 1301 Tactical was the center of the “A” Zone on an I.P.S.C. (International Practical Shooting Confederation) target. (Yes, I patterned the gun with some birdshot and I used a distance of 10yds or 30ft for those payloads)

Sure you could use five shots and most often in zeroing my rifle I will use a five shot group because I want to make sure that I minimize the outliers or as Pat McNamara calls them, “Junebugs.” However, I feel that three shot groups are sufficient to get an accurate feel of the payload and what it will do when launched from your shoulder-fired shotgun.

The reason I specifically mention shoulder-fired shotgun is that there are a couple new kids on the block, the Remington TAC-14, and the Mossberg 590A1 Shockwave. These shotguns have been available for over a year now and maybe close to two; however, they are basically hand cannons and are difficult to shoot with much accuracy using full-power payloads even for the most experienced of shooters. One man, “Brobee223” on YouTube has perfected the art and was very successful using his Mossberg 590A1 Shockwave to bag a couple deer late last year. I have linked his video below, give it a look. Fair warning, it is rather lengthy.

Back on track with patterning my Beretta 1301 Tactical. The first load I chose to shoot was by far the best and it really comes as no surprise. The Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 00BK, 8-Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad (LE13300) is the choice of many an experienced shotgunner. As you can see in the photo below, all twenty-four (24) pellets from my three shot group landed within a 3″ group with the three (3) larger holes being the wads.

IMG_6410

Below are photos of my other targets, using different loads, showing their patterns.

Federal 2 3/4″ 000BK, 8 Pellet, Maximum. (F127000)

IMG_6411

Olin Corporation 2 3/4″ 00BK, 9 Pellet Military Grade. (Brown Box)

IMG_6412

Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 1BK, 15 Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad. (LE132 1B) This was the second best pattern; however, I find that the 1BK is not as consistent as the 8 Pellet 00BK patterned in the first photo.

IMG_6413

Federal 2 3/4″ 4BK, 27 Pellet, Maximum. (F127 4B) Just to big of a spread for me at this range and not something I would recommend for professional/duty or home or self-defense use.

IMG_6414

As I mentioned above, I wanted to put some birdshot on target and here are the results. Birdshot Federal #4 Shot “Heavy Field Load” – 2 3/4″ – 1 1/8oz – 10yds (Take note, the larger holes were made by the wad, not the shot) This sure appears to be a tight pattern, it’s the lack of penetration that makes birdshot suboptimal in its effectiveness for professional/duty or home or self-defense use.

IMG_6415

Winchester Super Target #8 Shot 2 3/4″ 1oz – 10yds (Once again, the larger holes were made by the wad, not the shot) Same result, fairly tight pattern; however, penetration with this payload would also be an issue.

IMG_6416

So, once you have established a control group and your desired starting distance (Mine was 15yds) and you have selected the payload that you feel works best in your shotgun, it’s time to find out what the maximum effective range of your shotgun is with that particular load. In order to determine that, you will want to run your shotgun out to a distance and stop when you find the point at which you can keep all of your pellets from your chosen payload inside an 8″ to no more than 12″ pattern. I’d also recommend not only shooting cardboard or paper targets alone, make sure to shoot some steel as well. I happen to use 12″ AR500 discs that are 3/8″ thick, they work well with 00BK at this range.

From this test, it’s easy to see that my 1301T likes the Federal Premium 2 3/4″ 00BK 8-Pellet, Low Recoil Flite Control® Wad (LE13300) best at 15 yards. From previous experience with this payload, I can move back as far as 30yds and still keep the pattern inside an 8″ to 12″ group and that is precisely the reason I choose this particular load for my shotgun.

When I can find some time in between the courses that I am teaching and the ones I am attending as a student this spring and summer I will pattern my Vang Comp Systems Remington 870P to find out exactly what it likes best. Candidly, I suspect that there will be some similarities; however, one never knows until we put in the work.

If you need assistance in patterning your shotgun for professional/duty or home or self-defense use please consult a reputable Instructor/Coach who is familiar with the nuances of patterning a shotgun and can give you proper advice on the appropriate payload for your intended use as well.

Winding up I would be remiss if I didn’t give you an opportunity to train with Mr. Givens as he preaches “The Gospel of the Gauge” later this year in Lakeland, Florida. If you are an Instructor or aspire to be one I’d highly recommend that you train with Tom and Lynn Givens. For more information on the Rangemaster Shotgun Instructor Development course, please see below.

Rangemaster Defensive Shotgun Instructor Development Course
Chief Instructor: Tom Givens
November 16-18, 2018
Firearms Training Club of America, Inc
Lakeland, Florida (Private Range)
Tuition: $595.00

Register Here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/defensive-shotgun-instructor-course-3-day-tickets-39454107297

 

Until next time …

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Gun Pretenders a/k/a the Grass Eaters of the Firearms Training Industry courtesy of industry giant, John Farnam.

Many people ask where did I come up with the term, “Gun Pretenders” or “Grass Eaters” when referring to some in the firearms training industry. I respond with, it’s not original to me, all credit goes to industry giant John Farnam. I’ll let him explain as he says it best in this Quip from August 2013… There is a funny story about this quip, I was having dinner with John and Vicki in Ohio last November and mentioned this as being my very favorite quip and asked why it was not in the archives. When I returned to my hotel room after doing a little grocery shopping for lunch an email arrived from John with the quip attached. If you are not subscribed to John’s blog you should be. Find him at Defense Training International.

22 Aug 13

Gun Pretenders

Recently, a gun “safety instructor” in OH accidentally shot a student in a classroom during a “gun-safety course.” The injury was serious, but not life-threatening.

Now, we learn this was not the first such “accident” on the part of this particular “safety instructor.” Years ago, he “accidentally” injured yet another person during a similar, foolish gun stunt. I wonder how many other “accidents” with guns (that were never reported) this person has had between these two.

I don’t know this person personally, so I’m just using the foregoing as an example of what I see all too often hanging around ranges, on range “committees,” and purporting to be “instructors.”

We call them “Gun Pretenders.”

Most don’t even carry a gun. When they do, it is not the same gun, nor carry-option, they use for demonstration purposes on the range (on those rare occasions when they actually perform in front of students). For many, their only involvement with guns is some form of sterile, non-serious recreation.

When supposedly “instructing” students on a live range, many don’t carry a gun, even then! When asked why they invariably bleat that they don’t want to be embarrassed when asked to personally demonstrate something they’re teaching! “It might damage my credibility,” I’ve repeatedly heard them say. I don’t know what they’re worried about!

And, they dearly love to shower themselves with pious “titles,” invariably ending in “… master” or “…wizard,” and we never get to know where all these dubious “titles” came from. For one, I’m always suspicious when someone purporting to be an “instructor” finds it necessary to endlessly recite his entire resume, in boring detail, sometimes for twenty minutes or so, before finally getting to the point. When we all don’t already know whom he is, it strikes me as a strategy of desperation!

When sitting down with these people at a restaurant, away from the range, assuming I can get a word in edgewise, I often ask, “… yes, but are you personally carrying a gun right now?” You can probably guess the answer, “… well, of course not.” I generally have no further questions!

Competent instructors are well-trained, humble, accessible, eager to learn, eager to teach, have lots of personal experience, and actually “live” the Art. We don’t live piously withdrawn from it. We are driven to spread the sunshine, and we measure our success by that of our students.

Pretenders are mouthy, shallow, self-centered, self-righteous, vain, pseudo-sanctimonious, and constantly afraid. They spend their time, not worried about students, nor our Art, but desperately trying to maintain the myth of competence. As noted above, on those rare occasions when they do actually carry a gun, it and its “holster,” are unfailingly phony, glistening monstrosities, built strictly for irrelevant competition. These pretentious toys spend all the rest of their time in a padded, mahogany box in a dresser-drawer, gathering dust.

And, if you’re wondering if there is a point lurking in all this, here it is: A gun-owner, and particularly a gun-carrier, has the individual responsibility to acquire and maintain personal competence. History and fate will not accept lame excuses, nor will the court!

When you voluntarily take-on the personal responsibility to have the ability to protect yourself with gunfire, then you must be able to perform adequately, on demand. This has nothing to do with recreation nor competition. It is an individual, ethical responsibility, a matter of personal integrity and character. Bottom line: learn to be competent with your weapon(s) and yourself.

Become one of us, or go back to eating grass!

“How the hell did you know I didn’t have the king or the ace?”

“I recollect a young man putting that same question to Eddie the Dude. ‘Son,’ Eddie told him, ‘all you paid was the lookin’ price. Lessons are extra!’”

Lecture, caustically delivered by Lancey “The Man” Howard (played by Edward G Robinson) to a hapless “Slade” (played by Elmore “Rip” Torn) in the 1965 feature film, “The Cincinnati Kid.”

John Farnam

 

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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The Trigger Control Dot Org 2017 Year in Review!

Twenty Seventeen was nothing short of a whirlwind. The numbers really don’t tell the entire story, but you are gonna get ’em anyway.

I taught thirty-eight NRA Student and Instructor courses, four USCCA Instructor courses and five USCCA Student courses, eight closed enrollment courses of my own curriculum for Law Enforcement Officers, and twelve courses of my own curriculum for various groups of Responsibly Armed Citizens.

That is a total of sixty-seven courses, down six from last years seventy-three. I had some help, thanks to all my friends who gave their time to assist me with some of the courses I taught both here in Florida and elsewhere. I would be remiss if I didn’t thank my hosts as well. Without them, none of this would be possible especially the out of state courses.

My student/instructor candidate count is still being tabulated. Unfortunately, I have to count my signed waivers to get an accurate number due to a computer crash earlier this year. The number will be comfortably above eight hundred, down from last years count of nine hundred thirty-six.

Here is the really fun part, last year I was able to attend nineteen training courses as a student or instructor candidate, and I even took a hit of pepper spray for a training video as well. This just in, I think my friend Mike enjoyed seeing me in pain.

Below is a complete listing of the courses I attended along with the locations. Those with hyperlinks in the listing have course reviews posted in this blog, if you click on the link you will be directed to each of them individually.

April 1-2 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Combative Pistol Course; OK Corral Gun Club in Okeechobee, Florida.

April 15 – Assault Counter Tactics – Vehicle Counter Ambush Course; American Police Hall of Fame in Titusville, Florida.

May 9-10 – GLOCK Operator Course; GLOCK/GSSF Headquarters in Smyrna, Georgia.

May 19-20-21 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Advanced Combative Pistol Three Day Format; Oconee County Sheriff’s Office in Watkinsville, Georgia.

June 13-14-15 – General Dynamics Simunitions® Scenario Instructor and Safety Certification Course; Titusville Police Department in Titusville, Florida.

June 26-27 – SIG SAUER Academy Master Pistol Instructor Course; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

July 22 – Tactical Combat Casualty Couse (T.C.C.C.) On Point Safety and Defense; Wyoming Antelope Club in Clearwater, Florida.

August 14- 15, 17-18 – SIG SAUER Academy P320 Armorer, M400®/M16/M4/AR15 Armorer, Low Light Pistol Instructor Course; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

August 26-27 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Advanced Firearms Instructor Development Course; FPF Training, Stone Quarry Range in Culpeper, Virginia.

September 9-10 – Handgun Combatives Vehicle Combatives Course; Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office in Coffeyville, Kansas.

October 7-8 – Ken Hackathorn Advanced Pistol Course Aztec Training Services; Burro Canyon Shooting Park in Azuza, California.

October 23 – SIG SAUER Academy Bullets and Vehicles; SIG SAUER Academy in Epping, New Hampshire.

November 11-12 – Rangemaster Firearms Training Services; Tom and Lynn Givens, Instructor Reunion Conference; BDC Gun Room in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

November 17-18-19 – Defense Training International John and Vicki Farnam Advanced Defensive Handgun and Instructor Course; On Guard Defense in New Plymouth, Ohio.

December 4-5-6 – NRA Practical Pistol Coach School; NRA Headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia.

December 16-17 – Pat McNamara, TMACS, Inc. Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail; Panteao Productions and Sandlapper Rifle Range and Gun Club in Swansea, South Carolina.

Altogether, I traveled in and out of fourteen different airports, not including airports where I changed planes. Added nearly ten thousand miles to my vehicle for business purposes and rented fifteen vehicles from Budget, Dollar, and Enterprise. (Never again from the last two, I’ll stick with Budget Fastbreak) Had to rent a car in order to make the last leg home from Atlanta after attending Dave Spaulding’s Vehicle Combatives course in Kansas because Hurricane Irene closed all of the airports in Florida, that trip became known as “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.”

Additionally, I earned a lot of hotel points last year with both IHG and Hilton staying eighty-five nights in hotel rooms from Holiday Inn, Holiday Inn Express, Hilton Garden Inn, and Hampton Inn & Suites.

In early October I signed a consulting contract with a television network and I am negotiating one with a production studio as I type this blog post. Like it or not, traveling to Southern California will once again be part of the agenda in twenty eighteen.

Last year I also developed two new courses that moving forward will be part of my course catalog. One is an all-new one-day Handgun Essentials course and the other is also a one-day course that will be shot almost exclusively on steel, the name of this course is still in the works, but I kind of like “Steel Skill Drills Challenge.” This course will challenge your skills greatly and will also be somewhat of a stress inoculator with each and every drill using a shot timer, and yes, there will be a lot of movement as well.

It was a down year for book reading, I only read ten books last year and I am finishing my eleventh. The list is as follows:

T.A.P.S. Tactical Application of Practical Shooting – Patrick McNamara
Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail – Patrick McNamara
Mission America – Straight Talk About Military Transition – LTC (Retired) Scott Mann
Handgun Combatives – Dave Spaulding
Forensic Analysis of the April 11, 1986 FBI Firefight – W. French Anderson
Motor Learning and Performance: Instructors’ Guide – Richard A. Schmidt
The Little Book of Talent: 52 Tips for Improving Your Skills – Daniel  Coyle
With Winning In Mind – Lenny Bassham
The Farnam Method of Defensive Handgunning – John S. Farnam
Teaching Women To Shoot; A Law Enforcement Instructor’s Guide – Vicki Farnam
Guns & Warriors DTI Quips Volume I – John S. Farnam

I saved this one for last because a friend and mentor signed it and sent it to me as a gift:

Straight Talk on Armed Defense – What the Experts Want You to Know, Edited by Massad Ayoob with Dr. William Aprill, Dr. Alexis Artwohl, Massad Ayoob, Detective Spencer Blue, Ron Borsch, Craig “Southnarc” Douglas, Jim Fleming, Esq., Tom Givens, Marty Hayes, JD, John Hearne, Chief Harvey Hedden, Dr. Anthony Simone.

I’ll wind this up with some of the best news I received in a long time came last week from Go Daddy, they finally unlocked my domain name and instead of pointing at my Facebook page it will be back to a real website. What an ordeal after over a year of problems with a web design company who took control of my website and basically held me hostage. Look for the all-new website to launch later this month!

For now, I’ll leave you with the words of Pat McNamara…

Getchusum!!!

Ready-Ready-Break!!!

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: Pat McNamara, TMACS, Inc. Sentinel; Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail; December 16th & 17th, 2017 – Swansea, South Carolina (Host: Panteao Productions)

Earlier this year I finished reading Pat McNamara’s book, T.A.P.S. – Tactical Application of Practical Shooting. Immediately after that, I started  reading, “Sentinel – Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail.” Once I finished that book I knew that I wanted to attend a course with Pat sometime in the future, better yet host him for a course here in Florida. (We’ve got that scheduled, T.A.P.S. Pistol & Carbine Combo course on March 3rd and 4th, 2018 here in Lakeland)

Checking the TMACS, Inc training schedule, I found a Sentinel course listed in South Carolina at Panteao Productions and signed up immediately. So, two weeks ago I set my GPS to the SandLapper Rifle Range & Gun Club and arrived in the mid-afternoon the day prior to the course. Upon my arrival, I was greeted with a friendly Hello, and given a gift bag for attending the course, I thought this was a nice gesture from the Panteao Productions folks, if I lived in the Columbia area, I would definitely become a member of their gun club. My reasoning to stop at the facility first was it was on the way and I could gauge how long it would take me to get there the next morning from my hotel.

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Next, I was off to my hotel just outside Fort Jackson to get checked in and then like magic, my GPS mysteriously found its way to Palmetto State Armory, Sportsman’s Warehouse, and Academy Sports. It must be nice to have all three places within a few miles of one another where you live, and if you can’t find something to buy in these three places, you’re not an outdoors person or a gun person.

On Saturday morning I woke up to 28° weather, yes 28° weather. A little cold for this Florida boy, but it was all mind over matter, I didn’t mind, so it didn’t matter. I grabbed some fruit, chicken and a few bottles of water at the local Walmart, filled my gas tank, and made the twenty-minute drive down to Swansea arriving a little before 8:00am.

When I got on the property I was once again greeted by the Panteao staff and I signed a standard participation waiver and one for Panteao Productions itself because this course was being taped for a new DVD that they will release soon. You can find more information about that by clicking on the Panteao Productions hyperlinks I have embedded in this posting.

 

(Photo courtesy of Panteao Productions)

When I arrived at the range I was greeted by Pat with a firm handshake and a thank you for coming. I took the opportunity to thank him for setting up a course with me in Florida and then I was off to make sure I had my gear squared away. As each student arrived, Pat made a point to greet them, thank them for coming and he also asked where everyone came from as well. We had students from “Free America” and some from “UnFree America.” I believe one person flew in from California and one from Chicago, one or two from Virginia and the rest were all southerners from states like Alabama, Georgia, North and South Carolina, and yours truly from Florida.

Once it warmed up a little, Pat started with a short bio and then explained his philosophy on Outcome Based Training versus Performance Based Training.

Outcome-Based Training: Execution with consideration of the consequences, will I succeed, or will I fail? Outcome-Based Training is how many, how much, how fast.

Performance Based Training: How well can I perform a task. Performance is measured by doing what we can with what we have. It also requires the student to be introspective and to perform an honest self-assessment of where your skills are, not where you wish they were. The probability of achieving the outcome you desire will increase once you let go of the need to have it.

The Sentinel course is a foundational skills course with pistol and carbine at the forefront. There are also four additional blocks of instruction on Vehicle Preparedness/Urban Survival Skills, Combat Strength Training, Your House/Your Fortress, and Fighting.

Pat then went over his interpretation of the four safety rules, and then we started with getting some dope with our rifle optics. (Pro Tip: Show up to Gun School with your rifle properly zeroed.)

After each of us had a zero we then confirmed our zero with our iron sights. Moving forward we performed a simple “call your shot” drill from the standing position and then we shot five rounds resting our barrels on a fixed object, turning the rifle 90° and lastly using a forced parallax with our optic.

I took a photo of Pat’s target and posted it below so you can see his “storyboard.” He uses this storyboard to collect empirical data from his training sessions and takes a photo of it so he can refer to it in the future, this is similar to a system that I use; however, Pat takes it to a whole new level. As you can see this target has all of his zeroing information.

  1. Date
  2. Location
  3. Distance
  4. Temperature
  5. Wind Speed/Direction
  6. Rifle or Weapon System
  7. Ammunition
  8. Optic

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Next, we shot a “BRM Payoff” this is a 200-point scored course of fire done on four NRA B-8 bulls-eye centers from standing sitting, kneeling and prone. I have an excellent video of Pat transitioning through these positions that I will post shortly to my Facebook and Instagram accounts, links to those are at the bottom.

My BRM Payoff scores were 181 and 185, incremental improvements are good if you are focused on performance-based training and I was happy with these scores; however, even though they showed incremental improvement, there is room for a whole lot more.

This brought us to the first mini-block of instruction on vehicle preparedness. Most of us attending the course were surprised to learn what Pat has for his everyday driver, I would have never guessed it. Again, without giving away the entire POI or the contents of his book, let’s say Pat keeps a “Trunk Gun” or “Truck Gun” in whatever he is driving with an “I’m coming to get you” bag and another bag that he called his “Batman Bag.” The second bag being somewhat of a “Go Bag” with a few hours supply of survival essentials, a little food, water and some other things that you would need in case you got stranded or you were going to help a loved one who was stranded.

Next Pat talked about “dryfiring your vehicle” making sure you can debus in a hurry if you need to and that you should think of ways to escape, remember that mobility = survivability. Dryfiring your vehicle is particularly important when you rent a car or use one that you typically don’t drive much.

Once we finished lunch we started with some basic drills with the pistol.

Remember what the basics of pistol shooting are, sight alignment and controlling the trigger properly. All of us including Pat started at the seven-yard line from a ready position shooting single shots using the hole of our first shot as an aiming point for the rest. We then shot controlled pairs and ended with strong hand only.

It’s important to note that Pat is one of those trainers who could be training military units at Fort Bragg, or a SWAT Team one day and responsibly armed citizens the next, he is a rare breed who understands the differences in training these diverse groups of people and what their training needs are, unfortunately, many who make the transition from military to civilian life do not and they hang out a shingle professing their skills and they fail miserably.

We then had a block of instruction on Combat Strength Training.

The program breaks down tasks into four categories:

  1. Strength: How Much
  2. Power: Rate of Force Production; How Much, How Fast
  3. Speed & Quickness: Speed = Fast in One Direction/Quickness = Fast in Multiple Directions
  4. Hypertrophy: Muscular Development

My takeaway was that Combat Strength Training is not about building rock hard abs or a huge chest and biceps, it is about self-preservation and creating some longevity. It is also about making sure you are “fit to fight.”

TD1 wrapped up with an overview of what we accomplished and a short question and answer session.

We started TD2, at the same time, and with the same BRM Payoff Drill we did on TD1, my score was 188. Once again an incremental improvement and I was pleased with that because you are either getting better or you’re getting worse, you never stay the same.

We then cleared our rifles and shot a “National Match Mod” pistol 75-point course of fire twice for a score. This course of fire used a standard IPSC target using the following scoring method, minus 1pt for C zone hits, minus 2pts for D zone hits and -5 for misses. Make note of that because the next few drills had the same scoring method.

I found the National Match Mod to be an extremely challenging course of fire especially since it was shot at 50 and 25 yards. My 53-year old eyes are not as sharp as they used to be and so my first run was not very good, I only managed a 64. Then I spied what Pat had done to his target, and now I know why he always keeps a sharpie in his pocket. Pat had outlined the A zone of his target, in doing so it made a huge difference for me, I scored a 71 on the second go around. Little things like that give yourself an advantage and if it is within the rules, why not use it?

Our next course of fire was a version of his “Running and Gunning” drill. This was also timed and scored on an IPSC target as well. A good way to understand “Running and Gunning” is to watch the man himself explain and demonstrate it in the link I have provided here. Running and Gunning

We then shot “The Hellion” this one requires you to be a thinker and not just a shooter. I haven’t seen it on any of his videos, and because it is something that is difficult to explain in the written word, I’ll just do a video of it in a couple weeks and post it to my page and edit this blog posting with a link.

Lastly, we shot the four-position rifle timed course of fire at the same IPSC target used for the National Match Mod, Running and Gunning and the Hellion. We also used the same scoring system, total time plus penalties.

The reason we shot the same target was simple, first so we didn’t waste our resources and second to record empirical data, remember that from my comments on TD1? The photo below is of Pat’s target and scores after shooting these four courses of fire twice.

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TD2 also had the two remaining blocks of instruction in the Sentinel course, “Your Home/Your Fortress” and “Fighting.” These were very good presentations with a lot of discussion on defending your home and a lot of interaction in the fighting presentation with Pat showing us some basic boxing moves and then pairing us up with partners and us working on skills together. I found all four blocks of instruction worthwhile and very informative on subjects that we all need to know in being that agent in charge of our own protection detail.

We ended the day with Pat setting up some steel targets and shooting some drills that he is famous for on YouTube, like the Grinder, Steven Gilcreast’s “Blaze X” and also Grid of Fire, and a new drill he set up during lunch called “The Scanner.” This Scanner drill has a lot going on as you can see from the photo below. I can’t give the entire drill away, that would ruin the surprise when you run it the first time, but needless to say, I am going to steal this one. Of course, I will give the appropriate reference as to where I got it.

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We also had one steel target set up to time our presentation to first shot from standing and facing the target, then after turning 180° in both directions and lastly, while making a lateral move to the left.

We finished TD2 the same as TD1, with an overview of what we accomplished and a short question and answer session.

For this course, I used my every day carry gun and equipment and ran all drills from concealment. My Sig Sauer P320 X-Carry ran flawlessly with Federal American Eagle 115gr TSJ Syntech ammunition. I also used my Henry’s Holsters AIWB set up with a Sig Sauer brand magazine pouch.

In summary, the Sentinel course helped me to identify some areas in which my skills need some improvement and that’s what it’s all about. Seriously, having those performance-based training objectives helps me to be introspective and realistic about my own skills, it also allows me to set goals in order to make improvements in those skills.

Sentinel was my last course of the year, and honestly, I wish it had been my first. Pat McNamara is an excellent trainer and he constantly offered tips to all of us so we could improve our performance. I tend to gravitate toward trainers like Pat, and this is a course that I recommend without reservation.

You can find the TMAC’s Inc training schedule by clicking on the link below and if you are in Florida, consider joining us for the T.A.P.S. Pistol/Carbine Combo course on March 3rd and 4th at Firearms Training Club of America in Lakeland.

https://squareup.com/store/tmacs-inc

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Course Review: Defense Training International Advanced Defensive Handgun & Instructor Courses; November 17th – 19th, 2017 – New Plymouth, Ohio

“The time to prepare for your next shooting is now.” – John Farnam

Recently I attended the Defense Training International (John & Vicki Farnam) Advanced Defensive Handgun and the DTI Instructor Course in New Plymouth, Ohio.

Many of you probably know that John Farnam and Ken Hackathorn were two of the very first Instructors to take their Program of Instruction (POI) on the road and train Law Enforcement Officers, Active Duty Servicemembers and Responsibly Armed Citizens back in the 1970’s and if you didn’t, you do now. John and his wife Vicki, who have been training together as husband and wife for the past thirty-one (31) years are “Industry Giants” and if you have not trained with them yet, you really need to make that happen.

In case you didn’t know, John is also a long time advisory board member of Marty and Gila Hayes’ Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network along with other industry giants like Massad Ayoob, Jim Fleming, Tom Givens, Emanuel Kapelsohn, and Dennis Tueller. (In full disclosure I am a member of the network as well)

Let’s get to the course information. Friday morning, bright and early my friend Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC and I met the Farnam’s for breakfast and then we took the thirty-minute drive to the range so we could get started promptly at 9:00am. The weekend schedule was as follows, DTI Advanced Defensive Handgun Course on Friday and the DTI Instructor Course on Saturday and Sunday.

We started all three days in the classroom and on Friday John began discussing the art and science of defensive shooting and his “Four D’s of Fighting.”

  1. Divide his focus.
  2. Disrupt his plan.
  3. Disable his body.
  4. Destroy his will to fight.

During the classroom lecture, John talked a lot about the immediate aftermath of a self-defense shooting. His background as a law enforcement officer and a top industry trainer for somewhere north of forty (40) years gives him the credibility of a subject matter expert in this area. Folks, we’re talking about how to handle the 9-1-1 call, and how to answer questions from responding officers at the scene without talking yourself into a pair of handcuffs. (Never once was the words, “I was in fear for my life” spoken, I say this just to prove how infantile that expression has become)

While inside the classroom we also worked on some handgun retention and disarming techniques. John believes that it is more likely that you might have to disarm someone rather than shoot them, especially when you are within arms reach of your assailant. This is an area of Defensive Tactics that I wish more responsibly armed citizens would spend some time in training and not in the Dojo. In the law enforcement community, there are plenty of hours spent training these skills.

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(Photo: John demonstrating handgun disarms with Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC)

Once on the range, we were introduced to the Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Targets. These targets are absolutely diabolical, and shooting at them around simulated friendlies and or cover is not easy at all especially from distance. John and Vicki’s POI is all about moving off the line of force so you won’t be standing with your feet in cement while you present your handgun, and they get you moving after each four-round burst. Move and re-engage the threat/target from your new position and move while reloading as well. There is absolutely no need to stay stationary in a gunfight, that is unless you want to get shot.

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(Photo: Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Target)

The Ravelin Group Rotator® Rotary Action Targets have 8″ square paddles on them and in order to get them to rotate you must get your hits precisely in the right place and at precisely the right time so you can keep the inertia going. This can be both mentally and physically challenging as you’ve got to make every shot count, a missed shot breaks the inertia you’ve built up and next thing you know you have missed several times in a row because you get frustrated. All of us pitched our share shots during the course, it’s how we followed up those misses that counts.

During our range exercises, John emphasized his checklist that includes scanning and movement, reloading, creating distance from the threat, finding cover, checking yourself for injuries, accounting for everyone who might be hurt and finally calling 9-1-1. We practiced these things on the range after each drill and John would ask us key questions to prepare our “tape loop” for the immediate aftermath when law enforcement arrives on the scene.

It is worthwhile to note that John and Vicki run a hot range and will not allow a student or instructor candidate to ever holster an empty gun. An empty gun in a holster is useless and furthermore, it is dangerous because it adds to the administrative handling of the gun and most “accidents” happen during the administrative handling of guns. (Holstering) John’s range instructions are purposely vague, you have to be a thinker in his course and apply the instructions given into a plan to solve the problem.

The Farnam’s are also big on demonstrations as well. They believe as I do, a firearms instructor/teacher must be able to step up cold on demand and demonstrate drills to standard for their students. One has to be able to explain, demonstrate, and coach their students through drills, they must also give the “why” in training, most instructors can’t because they only regurgitate what they heard some instructor say or worse, what they read on the internet. If you heard it from John, he probably coined the phrase or developed the POI being taught.

During the Instructor course, John quoted these words many times as a way to emphasize the need to teach to the adult learning theorem, “What I hear, I forget; What I see, I remember; What I do, I understand.” He also made us keenly aware that feelings may be hurt during the course, it’s normal and part of the learning process. (My friend Steve mentioned that many sacred cows were slaughtered over the weekend)

On TD2 of the Instructor course, we got an excellent presentation from Vicki on teaching women. Her POI is based on her book, “Teaching Women to Shoot.” John and Vicki’s books can be purchased through the DTI Bookshelf at http://defense-training.com/

Additionally, the DTI Instructor course comes with a comprehensive Instructor Manual; however, you can find the POI well outlined in John’s book, “The Farnam Method of Defensive Handgunning.” I would highly suggest that you buy this book (And read it) before attending any DTI Handgun course, especially the Advanced Defensive Handgun course or the DTI Instructor course, you will thank me for that advice and you will be well prepared if you act on it.

Make sure that you prepare for some presentations as well, you will need to give them in front of your classmates cold on demand and with no preparation time. John and Vicki put pressure on their Instructors to perform. Thus you are assigned a subject and you must give a five-minute presentation and answer questions from the students and of course be prepared for Mabel to show up. (That’s Vicki’s alter ego)

AAA DTI Presentation

(Photo: My closing presentation last Sunday during the DTI Instructors Course)

In summary, I mentioned earlier that these two courses pushed me both mentally and physically and the qualification is not particularly easy. I was able to pass in seven (7) shots and some thirteen (13) seconds and change after a little warm-up and time to work out some frustration. My friend Steve from Trailhead Defense, LLC stepped up and passed in six shots, cold on demand. That is pretty darn good shooting on those targets. The classroom presentations including developing a plan to deal with the immediate aftermath and the handgun retention/disarming techniques are a key piece of John’s POI and I am glad he had time to fit them into our course.

I strongly recommend that you attend a DTI course when John and Vicki are in your area, and if you are shooting 9mm, make sure to bring 147gr FMJ or some +P, they spin those diabolical Ravelin Group Rotators® quite well.

You can find the Defense Training International course schedule located in the hyperlink below.

http://defense-training.com/schedule/

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(Photo: DTI Staff Instructors and Students – Advanced Defensive Handgun Course/DTI Instructor Course; November 17th – 19th, 2017)

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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Rangemaster Instructor Reunion and Conference; November 11-12, 2017 – Shawnee, Oklahoma (Host: Jack Barrett/BDC Gun Room)

In this the twentieth year of the Rangemaster Firearms Instructor Development Program, Tom and Lynn Givens held their first Instructor Reunion and Conference. The event was attended by fifty plus Rangemaster Certified Instructors and Staff. Forty-nine of whom participated in the range exercises and scored qualifications.

My weekend started by flying to Will Rogers, Oklahoma City Airport on Southwest via Houston Hobby Airport and once I got acclimated to the 45° weather (That’s cold for a Florida boy) I was on my way to the Oklahoma National Memorial & Museum in downtown Oklahoma City. My experience there in a word was, emotional. To see the site for the very first time where the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building once stood gave me cause to reflect on the 168 lives that were lost that day in and just outside the building. Of the 168 lives lost, 19 were children and seeing the smaller chairs in the memorial dedicated to them was difficult. Additionally, many chairs had flags next to them, those Americans were either active duty Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen or Marines or they were Veterans. If you are ever in the Oklahoma City area, you need to go, this is a part of American history that needs to be remembered.

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(Photo: Oklahoma City Memorial viewing from East to West. There are nine rows of chairs designating the floors on which the deceased were on at 9:02am April 19th, 1995)

TD1 (Saturday) of the conference started at 8:00am sharp with Tom welcoming us and outlining our agenda. We then geared up and headed to the range. The BDC Gun Room has two separate bays for shooting, one bay was led by Tom and Cecil Burch, the other by Lee Weems and John Murphy. We shot some bulls-eyes, casino drills, and an abbreviated Rangemaster Instructor Qualification. (If I gave you the entire course of fire then you wouldn’t have a reason to attend next years conference in Athens, Georgia)

Once we were back in the classroom we got an excellent presentation from Warren Wilson of Defensive Training Services on Gangs and the Armed Citizen. Warren is a subject matter expert being assigned to a Gang Task Force with a Law Enforcement Agency in the state of Oklahoma and is very familiar with Gangs and the feral humans who are members and prospects in this sub-human culture. The information Warren presented is proprietary to his company and none of the attendees were given a release to share specifics outside of the conference. Again, you snooze, you lose… I suggest that you contact Warren in the link I placed above and schedule him for training, it will be well worth it.

This brought us up to lunch. Tom gave us long lunches both days so we could network and catch up with friends we have made in the courses we’ve previously attended. After lunch, we got back after it with Tom and Lynn introducing the Rangemaster Staff Instructors.

AAA Rangemaster Staff Instructors

(Photo Credit: Lee Weems. The Rangemaster Staff Instructors. Left to Right, Tiffany Johnson, Lee Weems, Tom Givens, Lynn Givens and John Hearne. Lynn is holding a photo of John Murphy so he was included)

For the balance of the afternoon, Tiffany, Lee, John, and John presented “The Legacy of the Rangemaster Instructor Training Program” and “The Ten Principles of Teaching Rangemaster Doctrine.” Once again, we were not given a release by Tom and Lynn to share this information outside the conference, don’t you wish you would have attended it now? As attendees, we were given access to the powerpoint presentations, and if you attend next year in Athens, you will have access to this information yourself.

We adjourned TD1 just before 6:00pm local time.

TD2 (Sunday) of the conference started again at 8:00am sharp with Tom answering any questions from the previous days’ presentations and then we were off to the range for a short warm-up and to shoot a scored Rangemaster Instructor Qualification and the Casino Drill. It’s important to note that nobody came close to James Hale’s record Casino Drill time set earlier this year in Watkinsville, Georgia.

The B.A.D.A.S.S. (Benevolent And Didactic Association of Surviving Shootists) of the weekend was none other than Spencer Keepers of Keepers Concealment in Moore, Oklahoma. The man with “AIWB 1” on his license plate topped the list of the forty-nine shooters using his Langdon Tactical Beretta 92A1 to score a combined 384.75.

AAA Spencer Keepers

(Photo Credit: Spencer Keepers, Keepers Concealment)

I used my Sig Sauer P320 X-Carry with Federal Premium American Eagle Syntech 115gr TSJ. My chosen holster was the Henry Holsters AIWB/IWB. Other gear I carried was a Sig Sauer Magazine Pouch, Surefire Y-300 flashlight, Fury Pepper Spray in a Griffin Pepper Strike, Benchmade Reflex (Automatic) and my Medkit with CAT Tourniquet. (These are EDC items for me)

Rangemaster Conference

(Photo Credit: Tom Givens, Rangemaster Firearms Training Services)

Now, I don’t mean to rub it in; however, if you had attended the conference you would have had the chance to win a few door prizes. Jody Box from Arkansas won the grand prize of a new Smith & Wesson Shield M2.0, pretty cool door prize huh?

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the excellent job that Jack, Rachel and their staff at the BDC Gun Room did for us over the weekend. My friend Steve and I are looking forward to returning in January to train with Dr. William Aprill, Craig Douglas (Southnarc) and Mr. Givens, et. al. in Establishing a Dominance Paradigm. Oh yeah, in January, I will be renting some of Jack’s Class III weapons, I can’t let Spencer Keepers have all the fun…

The Rangemaster Instructor Development Program has less than eight hundred graduates, compare that to the National Rifle Association with 125,000+ Certified Instructors, and the USCCA with 2,000+ Certified Instructors. This is not a “gimmie” certification, a prospective Instructor candidate must pass two shooting qualifications and an eighty-two question closed book test at 90% or better to graduate from the Firearms Instructor Development Course, not everyone makes it.

So, when is the next Rangemaster Instructor Reunion and Conference you ask, the weekend of June 9th and 10th, 2018 in Athens, Georgia, northeast of Atlanta. You can lock in your seat now by clicking on the link below, but remember, you must be a graduate.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rangemaster-certified-instructor-conferencereunion-tickets-39451499497

 

Until next time…

As always, live life abundantly; train hard so you can fight easy!

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(Featured Photo Credit: Lynn Givens)