NRA Education & Training Department, Trainers Update NRA Annual Meetings in Nashville April 2015

Hello!

First, I had planned on video recording the Trainers Update in Nashville; however, I was unable to get a seat upfront in order to do so. My friends, Les, Joy and I sat about 15 rows back with over 500 other Instructors and Training Counselors in the meeting, so holding up my iPad to record was not an option that I was willing to try.

John Howard, NRA Education & Training Department National Manager started the meeting off with an overview of where the Education & Training Department has been and we are are heading. FYI, there are 119,000 Certified Instructors and Training Counselors currently holding NRA credentials.

Projects Completed:

  • Complete automation of credentialing for NRA Coaches.
  • Combined Muzzleloading into one Book/Lesson plan.
  • Pistol Marksmanship Simulator Training. http://trainingupdate.nra.org/#3750 (Recent Update: The PowerPoint is in the portal on the bottom right side, click on the slide for the PowerPoint presentation. There is a link below that for the Certificate)
  • America’s Rifle Challenge Guidebook.
  • NRA Certified Training Center – Trinidad State Jr. College in Trinidad, Colorado. This is a program where students can earn college credits for taking NRA Instructor Courses. It is the first of it’s kind so far.

Current Projects in Development:

  • E-Learning – Basic Pistol, BIT – Basic Instructor Training, Instructor Refresher/ReCertification Training.
  • Practical Coach – (Defensive and Hunting Skills, such as Defensive Shotgun, Rifle, Pistol)
  • New Basic Rifle Shooting Course – NRA Guide to the Basics of Rifle Shooting Handbook and Lesson Plan
  • America’s Rifle Challenge Video Series.

E-Learning:

  • “Blended Learning was designed for the student who has NEVER handled a gun.” – John Howard, NRA Education & Training National Manager.
  • E-Learning will be implemented late 3rd Quarter early 4th Quarter of this year, 2015.
  • There will be a transition period for Instructors and Training Counselors who have a supply of materials. At this point it is unknown how long that period will be; however, you won’t be stuck with printed materials that you cannot use.
  • At this time there is no established cost by the NRA for the student E-Learning modules.
  • Students are sending in surveys asking for MORE time with the Instructor in gun handling skills and shooting on the range. E-Learning is going to allow a lot more time for the Instructor to do just that.
  • John Howard and the NRA Education & Training Department feel that the Instructor is still the most important part of the program. It will be the Instructor who will ultimately certify the student, and the Instructor WILL BE GIVEN information on how the student progressed through the E-Learning modules of the course.
  • At the end John displayed the online E-Learning program, it was a brief sample; however, it was excellent. Too bad that not everyone stayed to get more information.
  • John Howard emphasized that there are NO secrets. Call or Email if you have questions or concerns. (703) 267-1500 or jhoward@nrahq.org

There were many questions from the audience, and the overriding theme of them were all about their concealed carry courses and how E-Learning will effect the Instructor and their business. Not surprising that no one asked about the benefits for the student. We all know that many get NRA Instructor credentials to do concealed carry classes. John’s response to many of theses types of questions was stating that the states have contacted the NRA asking them for help in standardizing curriculum. One attendee stood up and said, (Paraphrasing) “If you have problems with teaching and meeting the requirements of the laws associated with your states concealed carry training, you need to take it up with your legislature and leave the NRA alone.” I agree with that 100%, and I’m doing something about it here in Florida.

I believe that E-Learning will be excellent as it is designed for the student who has never handled a gun before. I also believe it will be good to have standardized training. It will be up to the Instructor to give the student the best experience on the range and handling the gun. After all, we are the ones they are going to remember most. If we do our job well, we will have a student that will take many more courses from us and we will be the first person they think of when they are asked if they can recommend a Firearms Instructor for classes.

Obviously E-Learning is a polarizing subject; however, I sincerely believe that the people who are pushing back against it are a minority, and they have fear of the unknown worried about their business income, not focusing on the positives of the program with the student in mind. The majority of the Instructors against the program have not taken the time to look in depth into it, these same Instructors also think they have the skills to write their own lesson plans. Where I am located in Florida, there are many of these types of Instructors who have no credentials qualifying them in writing curriculum for a Firearms Safety Course let alone a Qualification Course of Fire or instruction on presenting a pistol from a concealment holster, let’s not go into the legal advice that some of these people give, see my previous blog post for my rant on that subject.

I mentioned it earlier, the NRA says that the majority of surveys that are returned from students are requesting MORE time with the Instructor. We should be HAPPY that the NRA is taking the burden of a majority of classroom time off of Instructors and giving us more time to do the gun handling and range portion.

Oh by the way, John Howard mentioned using a long gun for home defense might be coming, so it is plausible to expect some possible curriculum updates in Personal Protection In the Home. I believe he also mentioned that Defensive Rifle, Shotgun & Pistol will be implemented in the NRA Certified Coaches program.

America’s Rifle Challenge
Nathan Judd, Lead Program Specialist, America’s Rifle Challenge Program

“Let Freedom Ring” is their slogan and you can find the downloadable guidebook and a lot of information on the program at http://arc.nra.org/ The program is a Course of Fire with an AR style rifle. In the survey the NRA sent out to Certified Instructors and Training Counselors on February 24, 2015 asking four (4) questions about an AR-15 Instructor Course there were 12,000 responses in 48 hours with a 96% response in favor. So, I expect that a course may be designed by the NRA in the future.

NRA Practical Coaches Program
Daniel Subia, National Coach Trainer, Rifle/Pistol

Daniel presented the program as a supplement to being an NRA Certified Instructor. I see it as a lot of added value in coaching your students into becoming better shooters and diagnosing their misses properly.

  • Practical Rifle Coach, Practical Pistol Coach, Practical Shotgun Coach.
  • Defensive Rifle, Shotgun & Pistol.
  • 3 Gun Coach.
  • Long Range/Hi-Powered Rifle Coach.
  • The NRA Practical Coaches Program will have training at NRA Headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia and there are also several Level 1 Coaching courses listed online at www.nrainstructors.org/searchcourse.aspx

There are currently 7,000 NRA Certified Coaches and you can find out more by clicking on this link below. http://coaching.nra.org/

Next we had a short presentation from Rick Ector of Rick’s Firearm Academy of Detroit on how to grow your business. It was informative albeit too short due to time constraints.

Pro Tip: Make sure that you have your email address updated and current in the Instructor Portal at https://www.nrainstructors.org/InstructorAdmin/insLogin.aspx Many Instructors said they are not getting updates and the overlying reason why is because they do not have current contact information in the portal.

One last thought… “Blended Learning was designed for the student who has NEVER handled a gun.” – John Howard, NRA Education & Training National Manager.

Stay Safe and Train Hard!!!

– Gordon

Follow my business Facebook page at www.facebook.com/triggercontrol

Do you have specific goals when at the range? Think S.M.A.R.T.

Yesterday evening Tom Givens posted this to the graduates of his Rangemaster Instructor courses and I thought it was way too good not to share. For those of you who follow the Trigger Control Dot Org Facebook page, you know that we share a lot of content to help make you a better defensive shooter along with many other things focused on the responsible armed citizen.

When I am at the range, I am there with a plan in mind to work on a specific skill set that is important to me. Sure sometimes I am there to “shake out” a gun that I might be using for training or a new concealed carry gun that I bought, but let’s face it, these days with the cost and availability of ammunition, range memberships, gas to get there etc… we all need a plan with some goals to work toward in improving our defensive shooting skill sets.

I give the “floor” to Mr. Givens.

What are S.M.A.R.T. Goals?

A critical step in increasing your defensive shooting skill is to be able to set up S.M.A.R.T. training goals. Think of it as driving your vehicle from your home to some other destination. You could drive around aimlessly and hope you eventually arrive at the address you seek. A better solution would be to get directions, plot them on a map, and follow those directions directly to your destination. That is our goal in S.M.A.R.T. training.

I’ve been teaching people professionally for over 35 years, for 18 years I owned a range where people often came to practice, and I teach almost every weekend somewhere in the US. On my range, I frequently saw people come and practice with no plan, no goal, and little or no organization. When they left they were not one bit better than when they arrived, and they could have accomplished every bit as much with dry practice at home. In our classes, no matter what part of the country we are in I see the same errors by shooters who have had a fair bit of prior training. The problem is, after the training their practice is unorganized, haphazard, and without real goals. Since they practiced so inefficiently they come to class shooting no better than when they came to the last class. We basically start over with these folks every time we get them in class. For your practice regimen to be of any real value you have to set goals and attain them. You can’t just say your goal is to be a better shot or to be “really good”. That is so vague as to be meaningless. We need a standard to achieve and road map to get there.

For a goal to be effective and useful to you, it should be S.M.A.R.T…. S (specific), M (measurable), A (attainable), R (realistic), and T (timely). Broadly general goals, generally speaking, will not be achieved. So, let’s look at each of these criteria and see how they apply to the defensive shooter.

Specific– each range trip or dry practice session should be planned around working on and improving one or two specific skills. The skill should be identified in advance so that you can have the correct supplies, targets, and any other equipment you need to work on those specific skill sets. Trying to work on everything at once leads to improving nothing significantly. It is far better to concentrate your attention on one or two skills in each session. In advance of your range trip or dry practice session identify the skill set you want to work on and then identify the drills that would help polish those particular skills. For instance, if you want to work on accuracy, a bulls-eye course of fire may be in order, or perhaps one of the small dot drills.

Measurable– a time and accuracy standard gives you a metric for seeing if you are actually getting better or not. Never just blow rounds down range. Every drill fired and practice string should be critiqued and or scored and targets taped or replaced so that you can see exactly where hits are going. Never rely on your subjective idea of how fast you’re working, you will just about always be wrong. You can have a training partner with a stopwatch, or if you practice alone you can use an electronic timer to verify your progress. Many smartphones now have timer apps available, so there’s really no excuse for not using a timing device in your range trips. To accurately measure your progress you can use standardized drills, exercises, and courses of fire. By scoring your targets and noting your time it’s pretty easy to track progress or the lack of it. There are a lot of standardized drills that emphasize discrete skills with well-known time/ accuracy requirements. The FAST drill devised by Todd Green is just one example. You either get your hits into the 3 x 5 card and the 8-inch circle or you don’t, and you either make the time specified or you don’t. It’s a great idea to use a small notebook as a log and note the date and time of practice, the individual drills worked on, and your scores/times. Tracking your progress in this manner gives you an accurate idea of how you are progressing.

Attainable– be realistic when setting your goals to avoid frustration and burnout. If you’re just starting out as a defensive shooter, a 1.2-second draw from concealment to a hit at 7 yards is probably beyond your reach. Find your current baseline shooting scored drills, record your score or time and set a reasonable goal for improvement. For instance, if a slide lock reloads currently takes you four seconds, make your goal cutting your time to three seconds. Once you achieve that goal, make your next goal cutting the time to 2 1/2 seconds. Each time you have a major improvement, it is going to be harder to make it to the next level, so work in increments that you can manage. Trying to go from that four second reload to a two second reload in one jump is a lot to ask. If you shot the current FBI pistol qualification course at 75% today, make your next goal shooting 85%, rather than 100%. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

Realistic– when setting goals, take into account your physical attributes, your training resources (time, ammunition, and money), your equipment limitations, and the context for which you are training. For instance, it is counterproductive to set goals built around what Grand Master USPSA shooters do with match gear worn openly if you are wearing a compact pistol concealed under clothing in an IWB holster. If you are older or have physical limitations take those into account realistically in your training plan.

Timely– set a real-time goal for your desired improvement. This helps you stay on track and put in the work. If you want to improve one specific skill such as the slide lock reload mentioned above, you might set a goal of shaving the time from four seconds to three seconds in three months of combined range work and dry practice. If your goal is to reach a certain score on a broad course of fire that covers a lot of different skills, you might set a time limit of say, six months. As mentioned before, use a logbook to record your efforts and your achievements as you work toward your goal.

Using the S.M.A.R.T. approach you can make the most of your training resources and I assure you, you will progress faster and get a lot more out of your limited training time.

Tom

 

Stay Safe and Train not just Hard, train S.M.A.R.T.!!!

Firearms Instructors Who Give Bad Advice, What’s New?

Last week on April Fools day, a Lakeland area man took a firearms safety course from a firearms instructor who works as an independent contractor to a local gun shop. This particular shop has locations in Apopka, Cassleberry, Clearwater, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Lakeland, Tampa and West Palm Beach. They are also major vendors at every gun show you can think of in Florida, I’m sure you have a name that is coming to mind about now.

During the class, this student was told directly by the firearms instructor that it is legal for him to carry a concealed handgun on a motorcycle in his backpack strapped across his back WITHOUT having a Florida Concealed Weapons or Firearms License.

After face palming, I told this gentleman that this is either a bad April Fools joke or if he was serious, this kind of advice could land him with felony charges. Even though Florida Statutes Chapter 790.25(5) has no clear language on this matter, there is a test case from 2008 on record in the 4th District Court of Appeals. The case style is, Daniel J. Doughty, Appellant, v. State of Florida, Appellee. In the opinion Judge Stevenson wrote the following which I will summarize here, you can read the full opinion in the link below.

“In this case, we consider whether the private conveyance exception of section 790.25, Florida Statutes, permits the unlicensed carrying of a concealed firearm or other weapon in a zippered pack around the waist while riding a motorcycle. We conclude that it does not.”

http://www.ecases.us/c…/fladistctapp/1785041/doughty-v-state

Another resource I highly recommend to our Florida students is Attorney Jon Gutmacher’s book on Firearms Law, Use & Ownership. Jon is crystal clear about this very question on page 90 of the eighth edition of his book. I encourage you to read the book several times, and keep it close by where you can refer to it on a regular basis. It may just save you jail/prison time and a considerable amount of money you will need for defending yourself in a criminal case. www.floridafirearmslaw.com

Personal note: Do a little research on your firearms instructor, and ask for references/qualifications. Going to a gun store for your firearms safety class is not always the best option. This instructor has a multitude of licenses from the State of Florida and gives certificates bearing his Florida K-License number, but one thing is certain, he should never be considered an expert on legal issues.

Lastly, never ever take legal advice from someone unqualified to give it.

Stay Safe and Train Hard!!!

– Gordon